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SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Half of all patients who have tested positive for hepatitis C have not had follow-up testing to see if they are still infected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That means many people are living with the disease and not receiving the necessary treatment to prevent health problems, officials said this week. Hepatitis C is the leading cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer and is the most common reason for liver transplants in the United States. The findings prompted the CDC to issue new guidelines urging healthcare providers to do a follow-up test on anyone who tests positive to an hepatitis C antibody test, which determines whether someone has ever been infected.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh, Los Angeles Times
Wade Gong's sister was 28 when she first felt a deep pain near the side of her stomach. Then she noticed the lump. The Chinese immigrant was uninsured, so she didn't go to the hospital right away. When she finally did, it was too late. She was in the late stages of liver cancer caused by hepatitis B, a silent virus that had been assaulting her liver since she was born. An Amherst graduate and math whiz who lived with her brother and parents in Rosemead, she died six months after being diagnosed.
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NATIONAL
June 20, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve, This post has been corrected, as noted below
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday for the first time approved a type of diagnostic test that will allow doctors to determine what kind of hepatitis C virus a chronically infected patient has, and tailor treatments based on that genetic type. No vaccine exists for the hepatitis C virus, or HCV, the most common blood-borne infection in the country. HCV infects about 3.2 million people in the U.S and leads to the death of 15,000 people annually. "Hepatitis C is known as the silent killer, as many of the symptoms go unnoticed," HIV and viral hepatitis expert Carol Brosgart, professor of medicine at UC San Francisco, said in a statement.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve, This post has been corrected, as noted below
WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday for the first time approved a type of diagnostic test that will allow doctors to determine what kind of hepatitis C virus a chronically infected patient has, and tailor treatments based on that genetic type. No vaccine exists for the hepatitis C virus, or HCV, the most common blood-borne infection in the country. HCV infects about 3.2 million people in the U.S and leads to the death of 15,000 people annually. "Hepatitis C is known as the silent killer, as many of the symptoms go unnoticed," HIV and viral hepatitis expert Carol Brosgart, professor of medicine at UC San Francisco, said in a statement.
NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Hepatitis C mortality rates surpassed HIV mortality rates in the United States in 2007, researchers said Monday. In a study in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine ( abstract here ), U.S. Centers for Disease Control researchers analyzed causes of death on more than 21.8 million U.S. death certificates filed between 1999 and 2007. Rates of death related to hepatitis C, a viral infection that causes chronic liver disease, rose at an average rate of .18 deaths per 100,000 persons per year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
Cases of hepatitis A have dropped dramatically in Southern California and much of the West over the last few years, and experts credit the decrease in large part to the widespread vaccination of children against the most common liver disease. Most of the drop has been among Latino children, who had a rate of hepatitis so high that a UCLA medical school study of the pre-vaccine years of the early 1990s called it an epidemic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh, Los Angeles Times
Wade Gong's sister was 28 when she first felt a deep pain near the side of her stomach. Then she noticed the lump. The Chinese immigrant was uninsured, so she didn't go to the hospital right away. When she finally did, it was too late. She was in the late stages of liver cancer caused by hepatitis B, a silent virus that had been assaulting her liver since she was born. An Amherst graduate and math whiz who lived with her brother and parents in Rosemead, she died six months after being diagnosed.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1997 | (Dow Jones)
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s antiviral Virazole capsules have been approved for government reimbursement by the Mexican federal health authorities, the drug maker said Wednesday. Virazole is approved for marketing in Mexico for a number of viral infections, including viral hepatitis and AIDS. The company said that patients prescribed Virazole by their physicians were previously not eligible for government reimbursement.
NEWS
April 20, 1988
The Red Cross blood services director at a Nashville, Tenn., center that mistakenly shipped 15 units of suspected AIDS-contaminated blood was fired and blood processing will be halted, officials said. Dr. Gerald Sandler, associate vice president for blood services of the national Red Cross, said he personally would make sure the Nashville center's to-be-selected blood director and its 20 lab technicians are fully qualified before the center is allowed to process blood again.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1985
Newport Pharmaceuticals International Inc. of Newport Beach said Monday it has signed Grupo Roussel, S.A., to market its only drug, isoprinosine, in Mexico. Grupo Roussel, S.A., a multinational pharmaceutical company with headquarters in France, will sell the anti-viral drug for treatment of such diseases as viral hepatitis, herpes and viral respiratory illness. The drug is not approved for sale in the United States.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Anna Gorman
Half of all patients who have tested positive for hepatitis C have not had follow-up testing to see if they are still infected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That means many people are living with the disease and not receiving the necessary treatment to prevent health problems, officials said this week. Hepatitis C is the leading cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer and is the most common reason for liver transplants in the United States. The findings prompted the CDC to issue new guidelines urging healthcare providers to do a follow-up test on anyone who tests positive to an hepatitis C antibody test, which determines whether someone has ever been infected.
NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Hepatitis C mortality rates surpassed HIV mortality rates in the United States in 2007, researchers said Monday. In a study in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine ( abstract here ), U.S. Centers for Disease Control researchers analyzed causes of death on more than 21.8 million U.S. death certificates filed between 1999 and 2007. Rates of death related to hepatitis C, a viral infection that causes chronic liver disease, rose at an average rate of .18 deaths per 100,000 persons per year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2003 | Jeff Gottlieb, Times Staff Writer
Cases of hepatitis A have dropped dramatically in Southern California and much of the West over the last few years, and experts credit the decrease in large part to the widespread vaccination of children against the most common liver disease. Most of the drop has been among Latino children, who had a rate of hepatitis so high that a UCLA medical school study of the pre-vaccine years of the early 1990s called it an epidemic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Steinbrook, a physician, is a Times medical writer
In recent months, encouraging reports about the use of interferon to treat patients with chronic viral hepatitis have been widely publicized. But many specialists in liver disease remain uncertain of the significance of the findings and caution that claims of a "cure" are exaggerated. The case of interferon is only the latest illustration of a recurrent problem for physicians and the press--how to present news of medical advances with accuracy, not hype.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1989 | Claudia Puig and Aleene MacMinn, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Blake Cause of Death Revealed Actress Amanda Blake, who starred for many years as television's Miss Kitty in the Western series "Gunsmoke," died of AIDS, her doctor has confirmed. Her Aug. 16 death of throat cancer at age 60 was complicated by a type of viral hepatitis brought on by acquired immune deficiency syndrome, her physician Lou Nishimura said Saturday. She died at Mercy General Hospital in Sacramento.
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