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Virgil Thomson

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October 1, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Virgil Thomson, the critic and composer who mixed the historical ingredients of music into a blend of luxuriant harmonies that stood in stark contrast to the wild experimentation of his time, died in his sleep early Saturday at his apartment in New York's Chelsea Hotel. Thomson, who as a newspaper commentator once described Jascha Heifetz's oeuvre as "silk underwear music," was 92.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010
The Pacific Symphony's annual American Composers Festival explores a different facet of music in America. This year's festival -- the 10th -- focuses on "The Greatest Generation," examining themes from the Depression of the 1930s through World War II. Programs at the Orange County Performing Arts Center will feature composers Aaron Copland and Kurt Weill as well as a world premiere of Michael Daugherty's "Mount Rushmore." In addition, the festival includes performances by two student arts groups to explore the festival's themes.
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BOOKS
June 29, 1997 | RICHARD HOWARD, Richard Howard is a poet, translator and critic who teaches in the writing program at Columbia University
American critical writing concerned with the performing and plastic arts--discursive texts frequently produced as journalism in this country between, say, 1925 and 1965--is among the best literature of its kind to be found the world over.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"The Mother of Us All" is, but for one problem, the ideal candidate for America's national opera. Written in 1945 and 1946 in the glow of World War II victory, it is about suffragette Susan B. Anthony, about battles won and hope for a just American future. It waves flags but not unrealistically. It has, in fact, a subtly wistful tone; its words are Gertrude Stein's last--she died of cancer just as she completed the libretto. Her language is pure American dialect but artfully assembled.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A title is a title is a title. And as titles go, "Prepare for Saints" fills the bill like a rose to a vase. Steven Watson has written an admirable behind-the-scenes Baedeker to the seven years of preparation leading to the smash 1934 Broadway opening of the opera "Four Saints in Three Acts." With libretto by Gertrude Stein, score by Virgil Thomson, stage direction by John Houseman, choreography by Frederick Ashton and featuring an all-black cast playing St. Theresa of Avila, St.
BOOKS
December 3, 1989 | Bryan R. Simms, Simms teaches music at the University of Southern California. His book, "Music of the 20th Century: Style and Structure" (Schirmer Books), appeared recently
Virgil Thomson always considered his importance as a composer to reside in his vocal music. "I shall probably be remembered, if at all, for my operas," he wrote in "American Music Since 1910," adding elsewhere, "I can make the words-and-music thing function probably better than anybody else." For Thomson, words were central to music. If a vocal piece was to be coherent, the text had to be clearly understood and its structure and accentuation meticulously preserved in the musical treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2010
The Pacific Symphony's annual American Composers Festival explores a different facet of music in America. This year's festival -- the 10th -- focuses on "The Greatest Generation," examining themes from the Depression of the 1930s through World War II. Programs at the Orange County Performing Arts Center will feature composers Aaron Copland and Kurt Weill as well as a world premiere of Michael Daugherty's "Mount Rushmore." In addition, the festival includes performances by two student arts groups to explore the festival's themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Sotheby's in New York City has announced the sale of items from the estate of Virgil Thomson. When the late American composer and critic died at age 92 in October of last year, he left his famous apartment at the Chelsea Hotel in Manhattan filled with furniture, paintings and sculpture. With the exception of several works by Florine Stettheimer, Marcel Duchamp and Jean Arp (to be sold by the auction house at sales Wednesday and Nov.
BOOKS
September 8, 1985 | Martin Bernheimer, Martin Bernheimer never studied with Nadia Boulanger. and
Nadia Boulanger thought of herself simply as a teacher. That's a little bit like thinking of Michelangelo as an illustrator, Beethoven as a tunesmith or Shakespeare as a storyteller. Boulanger was a force, a landmark, a gauge. Her one-woman school in Paris, affectionately known as the "Boulangerie," shaped destinies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"The Mother of Us All" is, but for one problem, the ideal candidate for America's national opera. Written in 1945 and 1946 in the glow of World War II victory, it is about suffragette Susan B. Anthony, about battles won and hope for a just American future. It waves flags but not unrealistically. It has, in fact, a subtly wistful tone; its words are Gertrude Stein's last--she died of cancer just as she completed the libretto. Her language is pure American dialect but artfully assembled.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A title is a title is a title. And as titles go, "Prepare for Saints" fills the bill like a rose to a vase. Steven Watson has written an admirable behind-the-scenes Baedeker to the seven years of preparation leading to the smash 1934 Broadway opening of the opera "Four Saints in Three Acts." With libretto by Gertrude Stein, score by Virgil Thomson, stage direction by John Houseman, choreography by Frederick Ashton and featuring an all-black cast playing St. Theresa of Avila, St.
BOOKS
June 29, 1997 | RICHARD HOWARD, Richard Howard is a poet, translator and critic who teaches in the writing program at Columbia University
American critical writing concerned with the performing and plastic arts--discursive texts frequently produced as journalism in this country between, say, 1925 and 1965--is among the best literature of its kind to be found the world over.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Sotheby's in New York City has announced the sale of items from the estate of Virgil Thomson. When the late American composer and critic died at age 92 in October of last year, he left his famous apartment at the Chelsea Hotel in Manhattan filled with furniture, paintings and sculpture. With the exception of several works by Florine Stettheimer, Marcel Duchamp and Jean Arp (to be sold by the auction house at sales Wednesday and Nov.
BOOKS
December 3, 1989 | Bryan R. Simms, Simms teaches music at the University of Southern California. His book, "Music of the 20th Century: Style and Structure" (Schirmer Books), appeared recently
Virgil Thomson always considered his importance as a composer to reside in his vocal music. "I shall probably be remembered, if at all, for my operas," he wrote in "American Music Since 1910," adding elsewhere, "I can make the words-and-music thing function probably better than anybody else." For Thomson, words were central to music. If a vocal piece was to be coherent, the text had to be clearly understood and its structure and accentuation meticulously preserved in the musical treatment.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Virgil Thomson, the critic and composer who mixed the historical ingredients of music into a blend of luxuriant harmonies that stood in stark contrast to the wild experimentation of his time, died in his sleep early Saturday at his apartment in New York's Chelsea Hotel. Thomson, who as a newspaper commentator once described Jascha Heifetz's oeuvre as "silk underwear music," was 92.
BOOKS
September 8, 1985 | Martin Bernheimer, Martin Bernheimer never studied with Nadia Boulanger. and
Nadia Boulanger thought of herself simply as a teacher. That's a little bit like thinking of Michelangelo as an illustrator, Beethoven as a tunesmith or Shakespeare as a storyteller. Boulanger was a force, a landmark, a gauge. Her one-woman school in Paris, affectionately known as the "Boulangerie," shaped destinies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1991 | MARK SWED, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The latest edition of Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians lists Marian Anderson, Leroy Anderson and Laurie Anderson. But if June Anderson is not yet included among such company, it is only because the dictionary is a couple of years out of date. Since its writing, the soprano from Massachusetts has become one of the most celebrated and sought after divas of her generation. She has been hailed the next Joan Sutherland so often that, well, perhaps she is.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Pianist Murray Perahia and conductor Sir Georg Solti were among the honorees for this year's Mumm Champagne Classical Music Awards, the second annual edition of same. Perahia jetted in from London for the New York ceremonies and received his award for his recording of Beethoven's Fifth Piano Concerto. Solti, music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, was awarded record of the year for a recording of Wagner's "Lohengrin."
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