Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVirgilio Barco Vargas
IN THE NEWS

Virgilio Barco Vargas

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | Reuters
Colombian President Virgilio Barco Vargas will visit Japan on Dec. 5-8, the Foreign Ministry said Friday. Barco will meet Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu and Emperor Akihito during his visit, officials said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Associates of Colombian drug baron Pablo Escobar have been trying to buy Stinger anti-aircraft missiles and machine guns in a plot to assassinate President Virgilio Barco Vargas, ABC News reported. One man has been arrested in Miami and charged with plotting to buy weapons illegally, according to unidentified sources quoted by the television network. An FBI spokesman in Miami said officials would hold a news conference on the subject today but he would not confirm or deny the arrest.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 28, 1986 | Associated Press
Colombia's president-elect, Virgilio Barco Vargas, has arrived to spend several days vacationing at the Pacific coastal resort of Acapulco, the government newspaper El Nacional reported Tuesday.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Colombian President Virgilio Barco Vargas told an international drug conference in London that drug barons are not invincible, and he appealed to cocaine users to give up the habit that has created havoc in his country. At the meeting, called by British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar said that the world traffic in illicit drugs amounts to about $500 billion a year, ranking just behind the arms trade.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Colombian President Virgilio Barco Vargas told an international drug conference in London that drug barons are not invincible, and he appealed to cocaine users to give up the habit that has created havoc in his country. At the meeting, called by British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar said that the world traffic in illicit drugs amounts to about $500 billion a year, ranking just behind the arms trade.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Associates of Colombian drug baron Pablo Escobar have been trying to buy Stinger anti-aircraft missiles and machine guns in a plot to assassinate President Virgilio Barco Vargas, ABC News reported. One man has been arrested in Miami and charged with plotting to buy weapons illegally, according to unidentified sources quoted by the television network. An FBI spokesman in Miami said officials would hold a news conference on the subject today but he would not confirm or deny the arrest.
NEWS
September 27, 1989
Citing a lack of evidence, a Colombian judge dropped charges against two reputed leaders of the Medellin drug cartel accused in the assassination of Colombia's attorney general and a kidnaping, a leading Bogota newspaper reported. The two--Pablo Escobar and Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha--are being sought by U.S. authorities. The judge's action in Colombia apparently would not prevent their extradition.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Virgilio Barco Vargas promised that if the head of the Medellin drug cartel surrenders, he will not be extradited to the United States and will receive a fair trial in Colombia. Hours later, the cartel threatened to kill a senator and explode a bomb in the capital if three men arrested last week are not freed. The three are believed to be cartel security men.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | Associated Press
A man on a motorcycle shot to death an adviser to President Virgilio Barco Vargas as he sat in his car at a stoplight in Medellin, police said Saturday. The adviser, Roberto Lozano Suarez, was shot three times Friday night, national police headquarters said. Two other men in Lozano's car were not hurt, the police said. Lozano, 42, was a land reform adviser to Barco for the banana growing region of Uraba, in northwest Colombia.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
The government and the country's main guerrilla group signed an accord Friday to begin talks April 1 toward permanently ending a 16-year-old insurgency. President Virgilio Barco Vargas, in a nationwide television address Friday night, called on the country's other leftist guerrilla groups to follow suit.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Virgilio Barco Vargas promised that if the head of the Medellin drug cartel surrenders, he will not be extradited to the United States and will receive a fair trial in Colombia. Hours later, the cartel threatened to kill a senator and explode a bomb in the capital if three men arrested last week are not freed. The three are believed to be cartel security men.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush flew here for his much-heralded summit with three Latin American presidents Thursday and proclaimed after about three hours of meetings that the four nations have formed "the first anti-drug cartel." An 11-page "Declaration of Cartagena" signed by Bush and the presidents of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru said that fighting drug traffic requires effective efforts to reduce demand for drugs in consuming countries and to stimulate economic development in producing countries.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing what a security source called "one of the hardest assignments" in its history, the Secret Service has prepared three secret routes for safely delivering President Bush to the Andean nations' drug summit in the violence-plagued Colombian resort of Cartagena, a White House official said Tuesday.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Virgilio Barco Vargas said Friday that Colombian security forces will maintain pressure on narcotics traffickers who have announced a suspension of their anti-government terrorist campaign. The traffickers, in a statement Wednesday, acknowledged the supremacy of the government and said they were suspending all executions, bombings and kidnapings. They also promised to end cocaine shipments and to turn over their weapons if given "constitutional and legal guarantees."
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed deployment of Navy warships off Colombia has further strained inter-American relations and complicated the drug war, the Bush Administration acknowledged Tuesday. At the same time, U.S. relations with Peru suffered a strain after U.S. troops surrounded a Peruvian diplomat's residence in Panama City. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said U.S. officials are providing assurances to Latin American leaders that the two incidents do not signal an increased U.S.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As furor mounted in Colombia on Monday over the prospect of increased U.S. naval activity in the Caribbean, the Bush Administration backed away from a plan to send two warships to intercept drug traffic off the Colombian coast. U.S. officials denied that the Bush Administration was planning a naval and air blockade of Colombia, as some Colombians charged. "We are not considering a blockade, only the interdiction of drug traffickers," State Department spokesman Margaret Tutwiler said.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | Associated Press
A man on a motorcycle shot to death an adviser to President Virgilio Barco Vargas as he sat in his car at a stoplight in Medellin, police said Saturday. The adviser, Roberto Lozano Suarez, was shot three times Friday night, national police headquarters said. Two other men in Lozano's car were not hurt, the police said. Lozano, 42, was a land reform adviser to Barco for the banana growing region of Uraba, in northwest Colombia.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the afterglow of the most successful battle yet in their war on narcotics traffickers, Colombia's top police officers called the bloody death of drug lord Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha "a splendid Christmas present," and editorial writers crowed Saturday that it broke "the myth of invulnerability of the barons."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|