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NEWS
September 4, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
After winning a bitter fight to lead the main opposition ticket in next year's elections, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro launched her presidential campaign Sunday, pledging to serve as "a bond of affection" among Nicaraguans deeply divided over a decade of Sandinista rule. "Unity makes us strong, and with love and determination, we will have victory in our hands," she told a rally of campaign workers a day after being nominated by the 14-party Nicaraguan Opposition Union.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her first act as president-elect, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro appointed her son-in-law, Antonio Lacayo, to negotiate a smooth takeover of power from the defeated Sandinista government. That decision produced the first spat within her victorious National Opposition Union, the coalition of 14 parties that is supposed to run Nicaragua starting April 25. Party chieftains met Wednesday to complain that they were not consulted.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
After months of being coy about it, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro declared her ambition to become Nicaragua's next president in dramatic fashion. The announcement filled three-fourths of the front page of La Prensa, her own newspaper.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her first act as president-elect, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro appointed her son-in-law, Antonio Lacayo, to negotiate a smooth takeover of power from the defeated Sandinista government. That decision produced the first spat within her victorious National Opposition Union, the coalition of 14 parties that is supposed to run Nicaragua starting April 25. Party chieftains met Wednesday to complain that they were not consulted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1989
The loyal opposition in Nicaragua has chosen two formidable personalities to represent it in next year's presidential election, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro and Virgilio Godoy Reyes. Mrs. Chamorro, publisher of the newspaper La Prensa and the widow of its former publisher, Pedro Joaquin Chamorro, was a safe choice to head the ticket. Her late husband is revered in Nicaragua as a hero of almost saintly stature.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
After winning a bitter fight to lead the main opposition ticket in next year's elections, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro launched her presidential campaign Sunday, pledging to serve as "a bond of affection" among Nicaraguans deeply divided over a decade of Sandinista rule. "Unity makes us strong, and with love and determination, we will have victory in our hands," she told a rally of campaign workers a day after being nominated by the 14-party Nicaraguan Opposition Union.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
After months of being coy about it, Violeta Barrios de Chamorro declared her ambition to become Nicaragua's next president in dramatic fashion. The announcement filled three-fourths of the front page of La Prensa, her own newspaper.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, publisher of the anti-Sandinista newspaper La Prensa, won the nomination of Nicaragua's main opposition alliance Saturday to run for president in next year's elections. On the same ballot, the Nicaraguan Opposition Union chose Independent Liberal Party leader Virgilio Godoy Reyes, one of two other candidates, as her vice presidential running mate.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
This country's political opposition, launching its six-month electoral campaign, unveiled Saturday a plan of government that would scale down Nicaragua's army and the revolutionary state built during a decade of Sandinista rule and give freer rein to private enterprise. Leaders of the Nicaraguan Opposition Union said the platform adopted by consensus after three days of meetings is the first to be shared here by such a range of ideological interests.
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