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BUSINESS
December 9, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Branson figures that the passengers who fly his airline and the customers who shop his music and video stores essentially want the same thing: entertainment. That may explain why musicians and other live acts routinely perform for passengers on his flights. "If you are going to be strapped to an airline seat for 11 hours, you should want to be entertained," said Branson, whose $2-billion empire includes Virgin Atlantic Airways and Virgin Megastores.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2011 | By Mike Reicher and Kurt Streeter, Los Angeles Times
One of them owns a twin-engine airplane and a helicopter. The other? A fleet of spaceships. Richard Branson, the billionaire adventurer, and Newport Beach real estate investor Chris Welsh unveiled a one-person submarine Tuesday that they said will be used to explore the deepest reaches of the world's oceans. The pair said they will begin later this year with the Mariana Trench, a 36,000-foot-deep valley that has not been visited by mankind since 1960, when a bulky, two-man submarine operated by the U.S. Navy made the voyage.
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BUSINESS
August 6, 2004 | From Reuters
Virgin Atlantic Airways ordered $5.5 billion worth of Airbus jetliners Thursday to double its fleet as it takes on arch-rival British Airways. The deal is a coup for Airbus, which beat out Boeing Co. for the order. It follows a string of orders for Airbus planes in the last month, reflecting a gradual industry rebound after three years of cutbacks amid an economic downturn, and despite concerns that record oil prices and security fears could hit airline earnings.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1994 | Associated Press
British Airways is following in the flight path of rival Virgin Atlantic Airways, with aerial gambling. The equipment will give travelers a chance to "try and win back the cost of their air fare--or even more," playing video blackjack, roulette and horse races, British Airways said. But the stakes might not really get that high, because the carrier doesn't want angry passengers storming off the plane broke.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Delta Gets OK on Virgin Atlantic Deal: The airline announced a favorable ruling by the Justice Department on its proposal to enter new markets by purchasing space aboard Virgin Atlantic Airways flights between the United States and Britain. The arrangement would introduce service by a third U.S. carrier to London's Heathrow Airport, a key international gateway, and enable Delta to fill a major void in its transatlantic operations. The British government has approved the deal.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1988 | From Reuters
London-based Virgin Atlantic Airways said Wednesday it plans to offer a one-way fare to London from Newark, N.J., and Miami for $88. The fare is subject to government approval on its flights from London to Newark and Miami, and will be available on all flights between Jan. 11 and Feb. 21, the company said. Seats can be reserved one day prior to date of travel and tickets are non-refundable, Virgin Atlantic said.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1998 | Reuters
Virgin Atlantic Airways said it will lower fares for U.S.-London travel to as little as $169 each way for tickets bought by Wednesday for travel through mid-March from Los Angeles or San Francisco. The London-based carrier said the three-day offer includes one-way fares as low as $99 from New York or Boston to London, based on round-trip purchase. The lowest fares are for travel on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The tickets are on sale only today, Tuesday and Wednesday.
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | Associated Press
If getting stuck in airport traffic is a drag, one British carrier will tuck you into weatherproof gear and haul you in by motorcycle. For free. Virgin Atlantic Airways estimates that by weaving in and out of traffic, the motorcycles can shave 30 minutes or more off the time of a trip between central London and Heathrow Airport.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2004 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Virgin Atlantic Airways said Monday that it was delaying by 18 months its plans to start flying the new Airbus A380 super jumbo jet, mainly because it was running behind designing a customized interior. The airline also said Los Angeles International Airport might not be ready to handle the 555-passenger airplane. Production of the world's largest aircraft began in Toulouse, France, last month, and Virgin Atlantic is the first to postpone delivery of the jet.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2003
Regarding "Airbus Super-Sizes," Dec. 7: "If we build it, they will subsidize." That seems to be what Airbus and Virgin Atlantic Airways are hoping for. If the Airbus A380 is to succeed, they will need U.S. airport operators to commit to billions of dollars to upgrade runways and gates. Every dollar spent to upgrade runways is an American job lost to overseas workers. Let the airlines buying the planes or Airbus pay for it. David Coffin Inglewood The plan to freshen up the Bradley International Terminal at Los Angeles International Airport with a coat of paint and other "eye-pleasing features" but not construct adequate gate areas for the A380 until three years after its introduction is a shortsighted strategy that might help Boeing Co. but will seriously hurt Los Angeles, California, the Southwest, travelers and commerce.
TRAVEL
June 25, 2000
Kamehameha Highway, a popular around-the-island drive on Hawaii's Oahu, has reopened to all traffic, three months after a rockslide blocked it near Waimea on the north shore. Tour buses had been banned from a temporary bypass installed after the slide. . . . In the air: Delta Air Lines on Saturday will begin nonstop service between Los Angeles and Boston. Introductory round-trip fares, good through Sept. 9, begin at $358. United and American are among airlines that also fly the route. . . .
BUSINESS
January 5, 1998 | Reuters
Virgin Atlantic Airways said it will lower fares for U.S.-London travel to as little as $169 each way for tickets bought by Wednesday for travel through mid-March from Los Angeles or San Francisco. The London-based carrier said the three-day offer includes one-way fares as low as $99 from New York or Boston to London, based on round-trip purchase. The lowest fares are for travel on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The tickets are on sale only today, Tuesday and Wednesday.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1994 | Associated Press
British Airways is following in the flight path of rival Virgin Atlantic Airways, with aerial gambling. The equipment will give travelers a chance to "try and win back the cost of their air fare--or even more," playing video blackjack, roulette and horse races, British Airways said. But the stakes might not really get that high, because the carrier doesn't want angry passengers storming off the plane broke.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Delta Gets OK on Virgin Atlantic Deal: The airline announced a favorable ruling by the Justice Department on its proposal to enter new markets by purchasing space aboard Virgin Atlantic Airways flights between the United States and Britain. The arrangement would introduce service by a third U.S. carrier to London's Heathrow Airport, a key international gateway, and enable Delta to fill a major void in its transatlantic operations. The British government has approved the deal.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1994 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest global airline alliance to take shape, Delta Air Lines and Britain's Virgin Atlantic Airways agreed Tuesday to forge a partnership that would give Delta access to London's highly coveted Heathrow Airport. Delta would become the fourth major U.S. carrier--after American, United and USAir--to serve Heathrow, by marketing and selling seats on Virgin's transatlantic flights from Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York.
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