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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1999
While it makes no difference to Peter Lefcourt's thoroughly just complaint against ignoring the screenwriter's creative role (Saturday Letters, Jan. 2), hasn't he, like many others, confused the Immaculate Conception with the Virgin Birth--the former being the Roman Catholic dogma proclaimed by Pius IX in 1854 to the effect that the conception of the Virgin Mary was achieved without any taint of original sin? JOHN ESPEY Pacific Palisades
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Talk about a Christmas news peg; try this headline: “1 in 200 mothers reports a 'virgin' birth, study finds.” Now, full disclosure, the study was actually published on Dec. 17. But some folks, like me, are just getting around to writing about it because, well, it fits in with the holidays in a shameless and somewhat tasteless way. (A little insight into the secret world of the so-called journalism profession: This is sometimes called “saving string.”...
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SCIENCE
May 26, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Female sharks can fertilize their own eggs and give birth without sperm from males, according to a study published Wednesday in the British journal Biology Letters. The joint Northern Ireland-U.S. research analyzed the DNA of a shark born in 2001 at the Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha. Analysis of the baby shark's DNA found no trace of any chromosomal contribution from a male. Shark experts said this was the first confirmed case in a shark of parthenogenesis, or "virgin birth."
SCIENCE
December 24, 2013 | Emily Alpert Reyes
Roughly one out of every 200 American women claim to have become pregnant as virgins, according to a recently published study . But scholars think that far from Bethlehem, something other than a miracle is afoot. Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill tracked how women answered questions on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. They found that a small fraction of women - 0.5%  - reported getting pregnant before they started having sex. Women with “virgin pregnancy” were twice as likely as other pregnant women to have signed a chastity pledge, with more than 30% reporting they had done so. Their parents, in turn, were more likely to say they had trouble discussing sex or birth control with their children, the survey showed.
OPINION
March 22, 1987
As usual, Conrad's cartoon is right on target. Though I think he confused Immaculate Conception with Virgin Birth. In fact, I believe the caption would have been even more incisive as: "Does this mean the Virgin Birth is off?" JOSEPH L. POUIER Santa Ana
BOOKS
January 21, 1990
Regarding "Immaculate Conception" (a poem by Louise Erdrich, Book Review, Dec. 24): Evidently Erdrich doesn't know the difference between the Immaculate Conception and the Virgin Birth. Quite clearly her lines concern the latter, not the former. The Immmaculate Conception is the doctrine that the Virgin Mary, from the moment of her conception in St. Anne's womb, was kept free from original sin. SHELBY J. LIGHT, Assistant Minister, First Congregational Church, LONG BEACH
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1996
Re "Gospels Based on Jewish Stories, Not Literal Truth, Bishop Says," Religion section, Oct. 26: Why do theologians such as Bishop John Spong insist on continuing the tiresome myth of the supposed dichotomy between traditional Christianity and modern science? There is a vast number of deeply religious scientists who are fully modern in their worldview and who also fully affirm the historical reality of the virgin birth, the miracles and the bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ. Moreover, these scientists come from all Christian persuasions--Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant; they are not limited to the so-called fundamentalist fanatics Spong opposes.
OPINION
January 22, 2002
Re Tim Jones' Jan. 16 letter on astrology: I suspect that Jones is one of the many who never studied astrology and takes it to be solely the pop astrology as posed in daily columns. Even J.P. Morgan had his own personal astrologer, Evangeline Adams. Maybe that is why he was so wealthy. Why the scientific types are always batting astrology I cannot figure out--when organized religion has more ridiculous myths, such as the virgin birth, that billions are taught to believe. In addition, certain religious "righters" try to block the more liberal thinkers from access to abortion and research using fetal tissue simply because they have medieval ideas.
BOOKS
August 23, 1987
Dolly Patterson's review of Carol Christ's "Laughter of Aphrodite: Reflections on a Journey to the Goddess" (The Book Review, Aug. 2) is less a review than an attack on Christ's religion. Patterson admits as much when she says, "It's not so much Christ's observations and research that are objectionable . . . it's the conclusions she draws." The conclusions, of course, are that women would be better off without Christianity. Patterson is a reformist Christian feminist, which means that even while she is quite aware of the profound problems of the Church, she still chooses to believe those things eventually can be corrected.
SCIENCE
December 16, 2006 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
In a scientific development suited to the season, Harvard University researchers have found a way to use "virgin birth" in mice to produce stem cells that are not rejected as foreign tissue. The process is called parthenogenesis, in which unfertilized eggs are biochemically coaxed into embryonic development. Though the eggs don't develop all the way to a live birth, they divide long enough for scientists to extract stem cells.
SCIENCE
May 26, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Female sharks can fertilize their own eggs and give birth without sperm from males, according to a study published Wednesday in the British journal Biology Letters. The joint Northern Ireland-U.S. research analyzed the DNA of a shark born in 2001 at the Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha. Analysis of the baby shark's DNA found no trace of any chromosomal contribution from a male. Shark experts said this was the first confirmed case in a shark of parthenogenesis, or "virgin birth."
SCIENCE
December 16, 2006 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
In a scientific development suited to the season, Harvard University researchers have found a way to use "virgin birth" in mice to produce stem cells that are not rejected as foreign tissue. The process is called parthenogenesis, in which unfertilized eggs are biochemically coaxed into embryonic development. Though the eggs don't develop all the way to a live birth, they divide long enough for scientists to extract stem cells.
OPINION
January 22, 2002
Re Tim Jones' Jan. 16 letter on astrology: I suspect that Jones is one of the many who never studied astrology and takes it to be solely the pop astrology as posed in daily columns. Even J.P. Morgan had his own personal astrologer, Evangeline Adams. Maybe that is why he was so wealthy. Why the scientific types are always batting astrology I cannot figure out--when organized religion has more ridiculous myths, such as the virgin birth, that billions are taught to believe. In addition, certain religious "righters" try to block the more liberal thinkers from access to abortion and research using fetal tissue simply because they have medieval ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1999
While it makes no difference to Peter Lefcourt's thoroughly just complaint against ignoring the screenwriter's creative role (Saturday Letters, Jan. 2), hasn't he, like many others, confused the Immaculate Conception with the Virgin Birth--the former being the Roman Catholic dogma proclaimed by Pius IX in 1854 to the effect that the conception of the Virgin Mary was achieved without any taint of original sin? JOHN ESPEY Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1996
Re "Gospels Based on Jewish Stories, Not Literal Truth, Bishop Says," Religion section, Oct. 26: Why do theologians such as Bishop John Spong insist on continuing the tiresome myth of the supposed dichotomy between traditional Christianity and modern science? There is a vast number of deeply religious scientists who are fully modern in their worldview and who also fully affirm the historical reality of the virgin birth, the miracles and the bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ. Moreover, these scientists come from all Christian persuasions--Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant; they are not limited to the so-called fundamentalist fanatics Spong opposes.
BOOKS
January 21, 1990
Regarding "Immaculate Conception" (a poem by Louise Erdrich, Book Review, Dec. 24): Evidently Erdrich doesn't know the difference between the Immaculate Conception and the Virgin Birth. Quite clearly her lines concern the latter, not the former. The Immmaculate Conception is the doctrine that the Virgin Mary, from the moment of her conception in St. Anne's womb, was kept free from original sin. SHELBY J. LIGHT, Assistant Minister, First Congregational Church, LONG BEACH
SCIENCE
December 24, 2013 | Emily Alpert Reyes
Roughly one out of every 200 American women claim to have become pregnant as virgins, according to a recently published study . But scholars think that far from Bethlehem, something other than a miracle is afoot. Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill tracked how women answered questions on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. They found that a small fraction of women - 0.5%  - reported getting pregnant before they started having sex. Women with “virgin pregnancy” were twice as likely as other pregnant women to have signed a chastity pledge, with more than 30% reporting they had done so. Their parents, in turn, were more likely to say they had trouble discussing sex or birth control with their children, the survey showed.
BOOKS
August 23, 1987
Dolly Patterson's review of Carol Christ's "Laughter of Aphrodite: Reflections on a Journey to the Goddess" (The Book Review, Aug. 2) is less a review than an attack on Christ's religion. Patterson admits as much when she says, "It's not so much Christ's observations and research that are objectionable . . . it's the conclusions she draws." The conclusions, of course, are that women would be better off without Christianity. Patterson is a reformist Christian feminist, which means that even while she is quite aware of the profound problems of the Church, she still chooses to believe those things eventually can be corrected.
OPINION
March 22, 1987
As usual, Conrad's cartoon is right on target. Though I think he confused Immaculate Conception with Virgin Birth. In fact, I believe the caption would have been even more incisive as: "Does this mean the Virgin Birth is off?" JOSEPH L. POUIER Santa Ana
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