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BUSINESS
August 1, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eavesdrop on a conversation between David Siller and Rita Zimmerer, top executives at video game publisher SunSoft Inc., and it's easy to see that Orange County's game entrepreneurs are a zany lot. "Our hero, Aero the Acro-Bat, is something different; I call him Aero-dynamic," says Siller, product development manager. "He's a hero for the '90s, someone who rides flumes and goes bungee jumping." "I like to call him an acro- brat ," interjects Executive Vice President Zimmerer.
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BUSINESS
August 1, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eavesdrop on a conversation between David Siller and Rita Zimmerer, top executives at video game publisher SunSoft Inc., and it's easy to see that Orange County's game entrepreneurs are a zany lot. "Our hero, Aero the Acro-Bat, is something different; I call him Aero-dynamic," says Siller, product development manager. "He's a hero for the '90s, someone who rides flumes and goes bungee jumping." "I like to call him an acro- brat ," interjects Executive Vice President Zimmerer.
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BUSINESS
August 1, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video game publishing companies seem more like movie studios these days. They employ camera operators, producers, sound experts, artists and production crews. Creativity, glamour and adventure brew in every corporate cubicle. They tap the talents of computer cowboys--programmers, three-dimensional animators and well-paid joystick jockeys who "analyze" games in front of a screen all day.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video game publishing companies seem more like movie studios these days. They employ camera operators, producers, sound experts, artists and production crews. Creativity, glamour and adventure brew in every corporate cubicle. They tap the talents of computer cowboys--programmers, three-dimensional animators and well-paid joystick jockeys who "analyze" games in front of a screen all day.
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