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BUSINESS
January 22, 1997 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aaron Lenz fondly remembers the "Macarena Bug." After logging hundreds of hours on a computer baseball game called "Grand Slam," Lenz discovered a major league problem. Whenever there was a runner on first base and a batter hit the ball to the shortstop, the baserunner would just stand and sort of jiggle instead of moving to second base. "It looked like he was doing the Macarena," Lenz said with a smile. "It was kind of kooky." In pointing out the glitch, Lenz wasn't being a smart-aleck.
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2000 | Dow Jones
Tickets.com Inc., an online event ticketing company based in Costa Mesa, said Tuesday that it has signed an agreement to be the exclusive live event ticket provider for VirginConnect's Web player. Financial details were not disclosed. VirginConnect is a joint venture between Internet Appliance Network and Virgin Entertainment Group.
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BUSINESS
January 18, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under a deal announced Monday, Orange County's largest video game publisher could become a major national player in the development of the next generation of interactive video games. Blockbuster Entertainment Corp., the nation's largest chain of video stores, said it has bought a 19.9% stake in Virgin Interactive Entertainment in Irvine, a transaction valued at $30 million.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Donning the cloak of moral judge, publisher Electronic Arts Inc. has decided that a video game it picked up from Irvine-based Virgin Interactive Entertainment Ltd. is so violent that no one should ever play it. Thrill Kill, a fighting game for the Playstation console, was one of 33 titles that Electronic Arts acquired in the summer when it bought Virgin's software development groups in Orange County and Las Vegas for $122.5 million in cash.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interactive 'Lion King': Disney Software and Virgin Interactive entertainment showed off the second video game the two firms have collaborated on at the Consumer Electronics Show in Chicago on Friday. Due to be released later this year, "The Lion King" video game is closely based on Disney's new animated film and represents a growing commitment by the entertainment firm to the quickly evolving multimedia industry.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1994 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
'Lion King' Game: Virgin Interactive Entertainment Inc. will hold a news conference at the Summer Consumer Electronics Show this week in Chicago to unveil its video game based on Disney's new animated feature, "The Lion King." The game, jointly developed with artists at the Walt Disney Studios and its Disney Software unit, is the company's first major collaboration on an animated film since last year's alliance with Disney and Sega of America on the "Aladdin" project.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1998 | P.J. Huffstutter
Electronic Arts Inc., the world's largest computer game maker, said it will acquire Virgin Interactive Entertainment Ltd.'s software development groups in Irvine and Las Vegas for $122.5 million in cash. The deal with Los Angeles-based Spelling Entertainment Group Inc., which owns about 91% of Virgin Interactive, casts a shadow over the fate of Virgin's remaining operations. Spelling has been in talks with Electronic Arts for nearly a year, sources said.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1998 | Times Wire Services
Electronic Arts Inc., the world's largest computer-game maker, said it has completed its acquisition of Virgin Interactive Entertainment Ltd.'s software development groups in Irvine for $122.5 million in cash. Electronic Arts, based in San Mateo, acquired the operations from Los Angeles-based Spelling Entertainment Group Inc., which owns about 91% of Virgin Interactive. The assets sold represent the substantial majority of the value of Virgin Interactive.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1998 | Times Wire Services
Electronic Arts Inc., the world's largest computer-game maker, said it has completed its acquisition of Virgin Interactive Entertainment Ltd.'s software development groups in Irvine for $122.5 million in cash. Electronic Arts, based in San Mateo, acquired the operations from Los Angeles-based Spelling Entertainment Group Inc., which owns about 91% of Virgin Interactive. The assets sold represent the substantial majority of the value of Virgin Interactive.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1998 | P.J. Huffstutter
Electronic Arts Inc., the world's largest computer game maker, said it will acquire Virgin Interactive Entertainment Ltd.'s software development groups in Irvine and Las Vegas for $122.5 million in cash. The deal with Los Angeles-based Spelling Entertainment Group Inc., which owns about 91% of Virgin Interactive, casts a shadow over the fate of Virgin's remaining operations. Spelling has been in talks with Electronic Arts for nearly a year, sources said.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Electronic Arts Inc., the world's largest computer-game maker, said Monday that it will acquire Virgin Interactive Entertainment Ltd.'s software development groups in Irvine and Las Vegas for $122.5 million in cash. The deal with Los Angeles-based Spelling Entertainment Group Inc., which owns about 91% of Virgin Interactive, casts a shadow over the fate of Virgin's remaining operations.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Internet, the mantra chanted by consumers around the world is access should be free, free, free. This is a problem that plagues most online ventures, especially in the computer gaming industry, where the trend has been to charge people to play against each other. America Online users pay for the service's new line of interactive entertainment.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1997 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The push for holiday game titles has already started, and Virgin Interactive hopes to grab customers by tweaking its marketing approach. First, the Irvine-based company announced its plans to target younger audiences for its Sony PlayStation titles. (The home-console platform primarily targets males ages 18 to 34.) With the release of "Disney's Hercules Action Game," Virgin and Sony Computer Entertainment America hope to grab the prepubescent and young teen crowd.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1997 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aaron Lenz fondly remembers the "Macarena Bug." After logging hundreds of hours on a computer baseball game called "Grand Slam," Lenz discovered a major league problem. Whenever there was a runner on first base and a batter hit the ball to the shortstop, the baserunner would just stand and sort of jiggle instead of moving to second base. "It looked like he was doing the Macarena," Lenz said with a smile. "It was kind of kooky." In pointing out the glitch, Lenz wasn't being a smart-aleck.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Computer games have changed a lot over the last 20 years--from the tedium of Pong to the sensory overload of today's titles--but 1997 may be a turning point for the industry. Until now, games have mostly been solitary affairs. One player, holding one joystick, matching his or her skills against a microprocessor. But industry leaders say that the Internet is ushering in an era when players around the globe can compete against each other--not just machines--in online tournaments.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The interactive entertainment software industry will generate about $7.7 billion in sales this year, and outpace Fortune 500 industrial companies in job creation, research and development spending, and investment in long-term capital equipment, according to a recent study by Coopers & Lybrand. Those are promising numbers for Orange County, home to a number of rapidly growing entertainment software firms. Virgin Interactive Entertainment Inc.
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