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Virgin Islands National Park

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TRAVEL
November 18, 1990 | JOHN McKINNEY
Virgin Islands National Park has everything that a Caribbean island should have: white-sand beaches, quiet turquoise lagoons, mangrove swamps and tropical jungle. For the hiker with an eye for the exotic and thick skin against "no-see-ums"--tiny flying pests common on the East Coast and in the tropics--it's paradise found. Virgin Islands National Park was established in 1956, preserving about three-quarters of the island of St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
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TRAVEL
May 16, 1999 | ARTHUR FROMMER
This past winter, I focused on some of the bargains available in the great parks of America's West. Now, as the weather gets warmer in the East, there is something for every taste and budget in our national and state parks, from a wilderness island in Michigan to the lush shores of the Virgin Islands. * Alabama: Lake Guntersville State Park. In stone and timber, the fanciest of Alabama's park lodges sits atop a high, forested bluff overlooking a large lake formed by the Tennessee River.
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TRAVEL
May 16, 1999 | ARTHUR FROMMER
This past winter, I focused on some of the bargains available in the great parks of America's West. Now, as the weather gets warmer in the East, there is something for every taste and budget in our national and state parks, from a wilderness island in Michigan to the lush shores of the Virgin Islands. * Alabama: Lake Guntersville State Park. In stone and timber, the fanciest of Alabama's park lodges sits atop a high, forested bluff overlooking a large lake formed by the Tennessee River.
TRAVEL
November 18, 1990 | JOHN McKINNEY
Virgin Islands National Park has everything that a Caribbean island should have: white-sand beaches, quiet turquoise lagoons, mangrove swamps and tropical jungle. For the hiker with an eye for the exotic and thick skin against "no-see-ums"--tiny flying pests common on the East Coast and in the tropics--it's paradise found. Virgin Islands National Park was established in 1956, preserving about three-quarters of the island of St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
TRAVEL
January 29, 1989 | FRANK RILEY, Riley is travel columnist for Los Angeles magazine and a regular contributor to this section
We've been snorkeling in warm Caribbean waters, following the underwater trail along the coral reefs of Trunk Bay off St. John Island. Through our face plates we can read about the reefs and fish on display markers beside the trail. With a flick of its golden tail, a butterfly fish lured me toward a patch of coral, where the blue shimmer of a queen parrotfish was leading my wife Elfriede astray.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Interior Department shut down a longstanding perk for members of Congress and other senior government officials, saying they no longer will get cut-rate VIP lodging at some of the most scenic national parks. The order affects retreats at the Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, the Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina and the Virgin Islands National Park in the Caribbean.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | From The Washington Post
1. Yosemite National Park, 1957-67. Stopped on way to Nevada, met a bear, fell in love with the view and stayed 10 years as park ranger. 2. Great Smoky Mountains, N.C., 1967-69. Crafts supervisor at Oconaluftee Job Corps Center (a "beautiful program that cost a heck of a lot less than putting these young men in prison"). 3. U.S. Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, 1970-72. Maintenance supervisor in the land of perpetual summer. 4. Ft. McHenry in Baltimore, 1972-74.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1994 | KURT PITZER
The first National Park Service employee in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area retired this month, 15 years after he helped establish a park that stretches from Griffith Park to Point Mugu. William Webb, 60, who served as assistant superintendent of the recreation area, said the toughest part of his job was the first park's initial few months in 1979, when he and former Supt. Robert Chandler faced opposition from many residents of the Santa Monica Mountains.
MAGAZINE
March 21, 2004 | Renee Vogel
One luxury hotel perk used to be the chocolates on your pillow at turndown, but these days candy is just so last century. A few more creative flourishes: * Handmade Native American dream catchers made of leather, beads, feathers and wire draw good dreams at the Inn of the Five Graces in Santa Fe's historic Barrio de Analco. Decor in the 22 suites fuses the Middle East and Old West. Inn of the Five Graces, 150 E. DeVargas St., Santa Fe, NM 87501; (505) 992-0957, fax (505) 955-0549, www.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | Brian Skoloff, Associated Press Writer
Standing upright, they reached 30 stories into the sky. For more than 1,000 years, the two giant sequoias thrived in the Mariposa Grove along Yosemite National Park's southern border. When they fell several weeks ago, a hole the size of a jetliner opened in the forest canopy. It may be months before park biologists determine what did in the trees. It appears that one sequoia growing near a creek collapsed and toppled the other.
TRAVEL
January 29, 1989 | FRANK RILEY, Riley is travel columnist for Los Angeles magazine and a regular contributor to this section
We've been snorkeling in warm Caribbean waters, following the underwater trail along the coral reefs of Trunk Bay off St. John Island. Through our face plates we can read about the reefs and fish on display markers beside the trail. With a flick of its golden tail, a butterfly fish lured me toward a patch of coral, where the blue shimmer of a queen parrotfish was leading my wife Elfriede astray.
TRAVEL
March 26, 1989 | STEVE BORNN, Bornn, a native of the U.S. Virgin Islands, is a free-lance writer living on St. Thomas
For the visitor who treasures retreats off the beaten path, there are plenty where the sky meets the sea in the U.S. Virgin Islands. But don't expect such retreats to be listed by telephone number. You must learn the secrets from someone who's been there. I have--and I have secrets to share. The Kite is my favorite hangout on St. John. It's a clean roadside shack with a tiny bar and a deck that hangs above a pair of turquoise bays and powder-white beaches. At the Kite a laid-back, personable St.
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