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NEWS
September 18, 1989 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
A colossal hurricane packing 140-m.p.h. winds pounded the U.S. Virgin Islands late Sunday night, taking dead aim at Puerto Rico after devastating the tiny Caribbean island of Guadeloupe earlier. Hugo, the eighth-named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, spun with storm-force winds that extended up to 100 miles from its eye. Its path was relentlessly west by northwest and it was expected to hit Puerto Rico early today. Hurricane forecasters spoke bluntly and with alarm.
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TRAVEL
January 25, 2004 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
FAR from the chilly waters of the Pacific Coast lies an American paradise in the heart of the Caribbean: the U.S. Virgin Islands, a United States territory since 1917 that has much to offer. Composed of three main islands with three unique personalities, the USVI have long been a favorite of boaters, divers and beachgoers. St. Croix has distinct Danish influences and laid-back appeal. Two-thirds of St. John is a national park. St. Thomas is one of the busiest ports in the Caribbean.
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NEWS
September 22, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A powerful Hurricane Georges ripped through the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico on Monday, with winds as great as 130 mph twisting trees from the ground, lifting roofs off houses and churning up 20-foot seas. By nightfall, the entire island was enveloped by the swirling storm, and downed electric lines had cut power to tens of thousands of Puerto Rico's 3.8-million residents. At least two deaths were reported.
NEWS
September 22, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A powerful Hurricane Georges ripped through the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico on Monday, with winds as great as 130 mph twisting trees from the ground, lifting roofs off houses and churning up 20-foot seas. By nightfall, the entire island was enveloped by the swirling storm, and downed electric lines had cut power to tens of thousands of Puerto Rico's 3.8-million residents. At least two deaths were reported.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | From Reuters
The U.S. military presence on St. Croix ended Saturday, three months after President Bush sent troops to restore order on the island beset by looting after being devastated by Hurricane Hugo. The last of a contingent of 280 Washington-based National Guard troops flew out of the island territory aboard C-130 and C-141 military cargo planes, taking with them dozens of military vehicles and heavy equipment.
TRAVEL
January 25, 2004 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
FAR from the chilly waters of the Pacific Coast lies an American paradise in the heart of the Caribbean: the U.S. Virgin Islands, a United States territory since 1917 that has much to offer. Composed of three main islands with three unique personalities, the USVI have long been a favorite of boaters, divers and beachgoers. St. Croix has distinct Danish influences and laid-back appeal. Two-thirds of St. John is a national park. St. Thomas is one of the busiest ports in the Caribbean.
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two months after Hurricane Hugo ripped through St. Croix with winds in excess of 150 miles an hour, 80% of the island remains without electricity and telephones, thousands are living in severely damaged homes under roofs fashioned from plastic sheets, and the winter tourist season has been written off completely. But, say many residents, even tougher than rebuilding homes and lives in this devastated U.S. territory is rebuilding the island's image as an "American paradise."
NEWS
September 18, 1995 | from Times Wire Services
The yachts that used to be in the marina are on the highway. The red roofs of houses are strewn on the ground. The duty-free shops where tourists used to look for bargains are filled with looters. Hurricane Marilyn has moved on from St. Thomas, but the Caribbean island that it left behind was a changed place Sunday. Electricity, water and phones were out. A quarter of the houses on the island were destroyed, and nearly all the others damaged.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
For years, St. Croix has worked hard to perfect its image as the perfect resort, a Caribbean paradise with a touch of Danish heritage, bathed by hibiscus-flavored trade winds and encircled by white, sandy beaches and warm, sparkling seas. The effort has been largely successful, with more than 1 million tourists visiting St. Croix and its two neighboring islands, which together--along with dozens of smaller islands--make up the Virgin Islands of the United States.
NEWS
September 18, 1995 | from Times Wire Services
The yachts that used to be in the marina are on the highway. The red roofs of houses are strewn on the ground. The duty-free shops where tourists used to look for bargains are filled with looters. Hurricane Marilyn has moved on from St. Thomas, but the Caribbean island that it left behind was a changed place Sunday. Electricity, water and phones were out. A quarter of the houses on the island were destroyed, and nearly all the others damaged.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | From Reuters
The U.S. military presence on St. Croix ended Saturday, three months after President Bush sent troops to restore order on the island beset by looting after being devastated by Hurricane Hugo. The last of a contingent of 280 Washington-based National Guard troops flew out of the island territory aboard C-130 and C-141 military cargo planes, taking with them dozens of military vehicles and heavy equipment.
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two months after Hurricane Hugo ripped through St. Croix with winds in excess of 150 miles an hour, 80% of the island remains without electricity and telephones, thousands are living in severely damaged homes under roofs fashioned from plastic sheets, and the winter tourist season has been written off completely. But, say many residents, even tougher than rebuilding homes and lives in this devastated U.S. territory is rebuilding the island's image as an "American paradise."
NEWS
September 18, 1989 | BARRY BEARAK, Times Staff Writer
A colossal hurricane packing 140-m.p.h. winds pounded the U.S. Virgin Islands late Sunday night, taking dead aim at Puerto Rico after devastating the tiny Caribbean island of Guadeloupe earlier. Hugo, the eighth-named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season, spun with storm-force winds that extended up to 100 miles from its eye. Its path was relentlessly west by northwest and it was expected to hit Puerto Rico early today. Hurricane forecasters spoke bluntly and with alarm.
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