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TRAVEL
April 27, 1997 | CHARLIE WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Waters is an editor in Life & Style
Four years ago, on our way to visit our money and our children at two colleges in Utah, my wife and I stopped at a small casino here for breakfast. Later, on our way home, we exited again for a soda and a roll of quarters. We remembered the meal as dreadful, but our luck was good. We also recalled the spectacular drive through the Virgin River Gorge and something rare in the Nevada desert--fertile fields that dot the river as it winds to Lake Mead.
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TRAVEL
April 27, 1997 | CHARLIE WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Waters is an editor in Life & Style
Four years ago, on our way to visit our money and our children at two colleges in Utah, my wife and I stopped at a small casino here for breakfast. Later, on our way home, we exited again for a soda and a roll of quarters. We remembered the meal as dreadful, but our luck was good. We also recalled the spectacular drive through the Virgin River Gorge and something rare in the Nevada desert--fertile fields that dot the river as it winds to Lake Mead.
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NEWS
April 14, 1995 | CHARLES HILLINGER and ERIC MALNIC, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A massive landslide thundered into the narrow Virgin River gorge, damming the river to create a flood that closed the only road, wiping out all the utilities and leaving more than 450 guests and employees stranded for almost 24 hours at the Zion Lodge, officials said Thursday. No one was injured in the slide, which occurred shortly before 9 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | CHARLES HILLINGER and ERIC MALNIC, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A massive landslide thundered into the narrow Virgin River gorge, damming the river to create a flood that closed the only road, wiping out all the utilities and leaving more than 450 guests and employees stranded for almost 24 hours at the Zion Lodge, officials said Thursday. No one was injured in the slide, which occurred shortly before 9 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
January 25, 2005 | Christopher Reynolds
The Kolob Canyon Scenic Drive in Zion National Park remains blocked by fallen rock and mudslides as rangers dig out from one of the rainiest winters. Roads will remain closed indefinitely as rangers use road-clearing machines elsewhere. The north fork of the Virgin River flowing through Zion Canyon swelled dramatically in mid-January. More rain or warm weather could melt snow, causing more flooding, officials say.
NEWS
May 31, 2005 | Scott Doggett
Zion National Park officials are not issuing permits to hike the Narrows from end to end because melting snow is spilling too much runoff into the 16-mile gorge. Rangers issue permits when flows in Utah's Virgin River do not exceed 120 cubic feet per second. The rate now is 10 times that amount, says Chuck Passek, chief of ranger operations for the Park Service.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Town Council has given final approval to plans for a giant-screen theater next to Zion National Park. The council voted unanimously this week to approve a permit for California-based World Odyssey to build the controversial 300-seat indoor theater, which will be joined by a 12,000-square-foot retail complex and a parking lot, at the entrance to the most popular of Utah's five national parks. Company officers said they expect construction to begin immediately.
TRAVEL
May 21, 2000
One of the great national park routes, the six-mile-long Zion Scenic Canyon Drive in Utah's Zion National Park, will be closed to private cars starting this week. It will be accessible only by a park shuttle bus, by foot and by bicycle. The change coincides with the opening of a sprawling new visitor center. The drive past colorful sandstone and shale formations carved by the Virgin River became a victim of its own popularity, said park spokesman Denny Davies.
NEWS
July 20, 2004 | Chris Togneri, Special to The Times
The Virgin River is running cold and green through thick cottonwood stands. Meadows lush with native grasses lap up against shockingly red sandstone. At lower elevations, cactuses dot the rocky slopes; higher up, hanging gardens cling impossibly to sheer cliffs that soar 3,000 feet above the canyon floor. It's a magnificent scene here now.
TRAVEL
March 2, 1997 | JOHN McKINNEY, McKinney writes the Travel section's weekly Hiking column
From aptly named Canyon Overlook Trail, we beheld the majesty of Zion National Park, a wonderland of sculpted cliffs and deep canyons. Before us a kaleidoscope of desert colors shifted constantly with the angle of the sun. "It's just like a birthday cake," exclaimed my Sophia, who just celebrated her 5th birthday. I applauded my budding naturalist's observation: In winter, the park does resemble a red-rock layer cake topped by snowy white frosting.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2009 | Joanna Lin
Two decades ago, real estate mogul Randy Black turned this blip on the Arizona border into a boomtown when he opened the first of four casinos. Nearly 1 million visitors a year followed, and hotels, restaurants and stucco homes seemed to sprout from sand. "It seemed to be one of those things that 'Geez, it's just going great. It's never going to end,' " said Victor Kotalion, who left Las Vegas in 1990 for this arid patch off Interstate 15.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2005 | From Associated Press
Nevada Gov. Kenny Guinn declared a state of emergency in Clark County and toured this flooded southern Nevada town Thursday. Before landing in Overton, about 50 miles northeast of Las Vegas, Guinn flew over a town awash with brown water spread across farm fields, horse corrals and rural neighborhoods. Viewed from the air, he said, it was clear how far the Muddy River had surged over its banks. "It's pretty devastating," Guinn said. "Especially for those who end up with water in their No.
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