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BUSINESS
March 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Farm Group Opposes New Disney Park: Walt Disney Co.'s proposed history theme park would have an adverse impact on rural Virginia from the District of Columbia west to the Shenandoah Valley--jeopardizing 50% of the state's orchards and 15% of its farmland, a conservation group said this week.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Farm Group Opposes New Disney Park: Walt Disney Co.'s proposed history theme park would have an adverse impact on rural Virginia from the District of Columbia west to the Shenandoah Valley--jeopardizing 50% of the state's orchards and 15% of its farmland, a conservation group said this week.
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NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
With a yearlong drought showing no signs of letting up, federal officials on Monday declared West Virginia and parts of five neighboring states disaster areas. The damage was apparent here as Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman stood at the edge of a stunted cornfield producing sickly 3-inch ears. "Drought is like an insidious cancer," he said. "It's slow, it infects and it's harder to deal with as a disaster."
NEWS
November 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Blazes in the mountains of Kentucky on Friday could be smelled 300 miles away in South Carolina as thousands of fires continued burning in 13 Southern states with no rain in sight before Monday. Foresters blamed a combination of dry weather, brisk winds, falling leaves and arsonists. South Carolina posted its first-ever "red flag alert" for 16 counties, meaning the area is ripe for wildfires. Officials there counted more than 125 wildfires in the first week of November.
NEWS
April 10, 1985 | From Associated Press
Thermometers sank to record lows today across the eastern third of the nation, with frost all the way south into Alabama, and apple and peach crops in New Jersey and West Virginia were nipped in the bud. Record or record-tying lows for the date were reported from more than three dozen cities, from Boston, at 26, south to Jacksonville, Fla., 37, and Meridian, Miss., 33, the National Weather Service said. For some cities it was the coldest for any April day on record. Elkins, W.Va.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | AVIVA L. BRANDT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Catnaping is big. So is dognaping. Dentist Bob Bloom was stunned when he came home recently to find his cocker spaniel, Millie, missing from his fenced back yard. Her blaze-orange collar was found under a nearby bush. "It was like I'd been violated. I wish someone had just broken into the house and stolen some inanimate goods like a TV that I could go into a store and replace," he says. "Who'd steal a dog almost 8 years old?" Plenty of people. More than 2.
TRAVEL
August 30, 1987 | ELLEN HOFFMAN, Hoffman is a Washington free-lance writer.
The casual or business traveler to the nation's capital could easily believe that the city is entirely composed of imposing monuments and formal gardens, museums that hold countless treasures and expense-account restaurants. It's all a facade. A facade created by Washingtonians who live here and by the tourism industry. The monuments, museums and the White House should be on the itinerary of any first-time visitor to Washington, and some are worth visiting many times.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1996 | DAVID REED, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Walt Wickham Smith milks his last remaining black-and-white cow, pulls a pocketknife from his faded denim overalls and gently prods her past rows of empty stalls into an oddly silent barnyard. So quiet. You can hear cats lapping fresh milk from a big metal bowl and a dog barking clear across the cornfield. Loose metal on an empty grain silo squeals whenever the breeze picks up. The glass facing of the employee punch clock is cracked, the time frozen at 7:40, and the 20 card slots are empty.
NEWS
November 10, 1996 | DAVID REED, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Walt Wickham Smith milks his last remaining black and white cow, pulls a pocketknife from his faded denim overalls and gently prods her past rows of empty stalls into an oddly silent barnyard. So quiet. You can hear cats lapping fresh milk from a big metal bowl and a dog barking clear across the cornfield. Loose metal on an empty grain silo squeals whenever the breeze picks up. The glass facing of the employee punch clock is cracked, the time frozen at 7:40, and the 20 card slots are empty.
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