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NEWS
January 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Republican Gov. George F. Allen delivered a sharply partisan attack on the state government over which he just took control, promising to transform a bloated bureaucracy with his own brand of "creative conservatism." Declaring his landslide victory "the most dramatic call for change we have seen in modern times in Virginia," Allen pledged in his inaugural speech in Richmond to wrest Virginia's government from the "stolid, status quo, monarchical elitists."
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NEWS
January 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Republican Gov. George F. Allen delivered a sharply partisan attack on the state government over which he just took control, promising to transform a bloated bureaucracy with his own brand of "creative conservatism." Declaring his landslide victory "the most dramatic call for change we have seen in modern times in Virginia," Allen pledged in his inaugural speech in Richmond to wrest Virginia's government from the "stolid, status quo, monarchical elitists."
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NEWS
February 25, 1988
A crisis over an unconstitutional West Virginia budget was eased when state officials agreed to continue government as usual until they hear more from the state Supreme Court. The high court had issued a 3-2 opinion calling the budget unconstitutional because it contains a $26-million deficit. But the court granted a 60-day grace period during which the ruling would be suspended while a rehearing is requested. Initially, Treasurer A. James Manchin said he would not process any more state bills.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder announced his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination Friday, vowing to beat the odds in his quest for the White House, just as he did to become the nation's first elected black governor nearly two years ago. Although conceding that he is "the longest of long shots," the 60-year-old grandson of slaves said he "would not deserve to be who I am if I failed to step forward at this critical juncture in our nation's history."
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | Ellen Gamerman, The Baltimore Sun
There are no shops here. No hotels, no restaurants, no malls. Around one of the Civil War's most historically significant battlefields, there is no road to a frappuccino or Victoria's Secret. But suburbia is banging on this battlefield's door. A national fight over just how much development can bump up against Civil War battlegrounds is erupting here, on the land where Confederate Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson died, where one of history's most famous surprise attacks occurred, where Robert E.
MAGAZINE
August 11, 1991 | MICHAEL BARONE, Michael Barone is a senior writer for U.S. News & World Report and co-author of "The Almanac of American Politics."
Return for a moment to a time when the Democrats seemed about to inherit the world. It's October 1976, and at San Francisco International Airport, a group of Bay Area Democratic politicians are waiting to greet the man who has been running far ahead in the polls for weeks: Jimmy Carter. The tawny-brown San Bruno hills loom in the distance, and the air has almost a rosy hue in the late-afternoon light.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Testing the presidential waters here last week, Democratic Gov. L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia coined a campaign slogan designed to spotlight President Bush's alleged failure to meet this country's domestic needs--"Put America First."
NATIONAL
April 28, 2004 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
Last week, the word swept through Washington: During a fire drill, Sen. Evan Bayh was seen leaving his office building alongside Jim Johnson, the man charged with helping Sen. John F. Kerry pick his running mate. Their appearance -- the two smoked out, as it were -- was immediately taken as a sign that Bayh, an Indiana Democrat, had landed on Kerry's short list of vice presidential prospects. Never mind that neither Bayh nor Johnson would talk to reporters about their discussion.
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