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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1987
Bravo Bernheimer! His Sept. 7 review ("Clark & Company Don't Do Much at the Doolittle") captured the absolute essence of Michael Clark's dance performance (better titled: "Mediocre Choreographer and the Brown Shirt Band"). What's more amazing is that Bernheimer managed to retain his sense of humor and write a review 50 times more entertaining than its subject. One positive point in an astoundingly boring evening: The rude and utterly pretentious audience at the Doolittle Sunday night got just the sort of performance they deserved.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1987
Bravo Bernheimer! His Sept. 7 review ("Clark & Company Don't Do Much at the Doolittle") captured the absolute essence of Michael Clark's dance performance (better titled: "Mediocre Choreographer and the Brown Shirt Band"). What's more amazing is that Bernheimer managed to retain his sense of humor and write a review 50 times more entertaining than its subject. One positive point in an astoundingly boring evening: The rude and utterly pretentious audience at the Doolittle Sunday night got just the sort of performance they deserved.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1987 | ROBERT KOEHLER
If the Fringe festival has been a grab-bag affair, nothing better epitomizes it than the one-act trio at Fifth Estate Theatre, "Missing Persons." All three are incomplete in every way--as character studies, as dramas or as insights into our endless need for human contact. Bill Bremer's "Siege" (he also directed) is typical: He sets up a situation where Al (Robert Dean Kozak) is in self-imposed exile from women and then must decide to rejoin or not rejoin the human race.
SPORTS
November 18, 1989 | SANDRA McKEE, BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
There are at least three weeks to go in this college football season, but the postseason bowls seem sewn up. Depending on which bowl director is asked, the reason is because the Orange Bowl lined up its guests early and forced everyone else to scramble for position. Of course, if the question is directed to Orange Bowl executive director Steven Hatchell, he will tell you something else. "The bowl pick 'em day is the third Saturday after the third Tuesday in November," said Hatchell.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | BECKY EBENKAMP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're in your 20s or early 30s, chances are you spent your formative years tuned in to a world created by Aaron Spelling: a world where beautiful women with perfect 1970s hair and halter tops caught the bad guys without ever breaking a nail. This was the world of "Charlie's Angels." Well, "Charlie's Angels" are back, in the form of "Chuck's Cherubs--Undercover in Real Estate," playing through Sept. 26 at Long Beach's Found Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1994 | GERALD FARIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susan Malmstrom admits that she was nervous the first time she attended a play at the 40-seat storefront Found Theatre, which sits between a sandwich shop and a bridal store on a drab, busy downtown street here. "It's really a tiny alternative theater, and you don't know what you'll get into," she said. "If you leave, you almost have to cross the stage, and everyone will notice you." But her reticence quickly vanished.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2003 | David C. Nichols; Philip Brandes; Rob Kendt
The 20th century phenomenon of concept album-turned-pop opera (or "popera") arguably peaked at "Chess." Conceived by lyricist Tim Rice with ABBA tunesmiths Benny Andersson and Bjorn Ulvaeus, the 1984 recording was a worldwide sensation, producing chart-toppers in "One Night in Bangkok" and "I Know Him So Well." Yet, the 1986 London stage extravaganza, inherited by Trevor Nunn from an ailing Michael Bennett, ended its three-year run in the red.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994 | GERALD FARIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susan Malmstrom admits that she was nervous the first time she attended a play at the 40-seat storefront Found Theatre, which sits between a sandwich shop and a bridal store on a drab, busy street in downtown Long Beach. "It's really a tiny alternative theater and you don't know what you'll get into," she said. "If you leave, you almost have to cross the stage and everyone will notice you." But her reticence quickly vanished.
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