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NEWS
April 9, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the untrained eye, the view from the vacant storefronts lining what was once the thriving downtown of this Atlantic Coast seaport is a rural tableau of rust and rot. Across Mason Avenue lies a decrepit railroad yard and a couple of derelict fishing boats. The town dump, on the other side of the tracks, was abandoned three decades ago but was only fenced off last month.
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NEWS
April 9, 1996 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the untrained eye, the view from the vacant storefronts lining what was once the thriving downtown of this Atlantic Coast seaport is a rural tableau of rust and rot. Across Mason Avenue lies a decrepit railroad yard and a couple of derelict fishing boats. The town dump, on the other side of the tracks, was abandoned three decades ago but was only fenced off last month.
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BUSINESS
March 6, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Disney to Sell Property: The Burbank-based media giant has put about 600 acres near Haymarket, Va., up for sale after plans for a $650-million theme park there were terminated amid opposition, the Washington Post said. Quoting sources familiar with Walt Disney Co., the paper said the company is dismantling operations in the area.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Disney to Sell Property: The Burbank-based media giant has put about 600 acres near Haymarket, Va., up for sale after plans for a $650-million theme park there were terminated amid opposition, the Washington Post said. Quoting sources familiar with Walt Disney Co., the paper said the company is dismantling operations in the area.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Disney Chief Vows Tenacity on Virginia Park: Walt Disney Co. Chairman Michael D. Eisner said he has been surprised by the strong opposition to the company's proposed theme park in Virginia but said he has no intention of dropping the project. "If the people think we will back off, they are mistaken," Eisner told the Washington Post. Eisner said he wants to make the completion of Disney's America, a $650-million theme park focused on U.S. history, the highlight of his chairmanship.
SPORTS
July 9, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, Jack Kent Cooke and officials from the Virginia Retirement System will hold a news conference today to unveil plans to build a stadium for the Washington Redskins in Alexandria, Va., team officials said. The plan is being met coolly by local officials, who are concerned about a $125-million requirement from Virginia for costs associated with construction of the 78,000-seat stadium.
NEWS
July 17, 1988
More than 3,000 Civil War buffs and preservationists braved 100-degree temperatures to protest plans to build a shopping complex next to the Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia. "Some people believe the best way to preserve this battleground is to build a 1.2-million-square-foot shopping mall on it," said Rep. Robert J. Mrazek (D-N.Y.), who sponsored legislation that would block the development.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | Associated Press
The House voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to have the government take a developer's 542-acre tract of land adjacent to a historical Civil War battlefield in nearby Virginia. By a vote of 307 to 98, the House approved a bill to acquire the land of a developer who has proposed a shopping complex, add the tract to the 4,600-acre Manassas National Battlefield Park, close two roads running through the battlefield and build new roads around the park. The measure now goes to the Senate for action.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1994 | FAYE FIORE and KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In abandoning its proposed Virginia site for a bitterly opposed $650-million theme park, Walt Disney Co. scored points on Wall Street and among its critics in the academic and environmental communities, protecting an image as a responsible and savvy company. But some observers said Thursday that its sudden about-face may have damaged its credibility and demonstrated that it can be whipped, raising questions about its prospects for reviving the project at another location.
NEWS
March 28, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
They're calling it the third great battle of Manassas. It was here, in the rolling hills and open fields overlooking Bull Run creek, that 35,000 cocksure Union troops were routed in July, 1861, by a surprisingly strong Confederate force in the first battle of the Civil War. A year later, Confederate Gen. Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson reputedly earned his nickname in another major clash on the site.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1994 | FAYE FIORE and KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In abandoning its proposed Virginia site for a bitterly opposed $650-million theme park, Walt Disney Co. scored points on Wall Street and among its critics in the academic and environmental communities, protecting an image as a responsible and savvy company. But some observers said Thursday that its sudden about-face may have damaged its credibility and demonstrated that it can be whipped, raising questions about its prospects for reviving the project at another location.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Use your imagination," Roy Frampton was saying, his hand sweeping across the empty battlefield. "Out of the woods straight ahead come 12,000 Southerners, line upon line, rank upon rank, regiment upon regiment, marching, marching, marching, 110 steps a minute, keeping the rhythm of the drum, flags waving, an overwhelming tide of men. You hear their yell and now they're on the dead run, coming right at us. "The Northerners are here, right where we're standing. They're firing volley upon volley.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are no cannons exploding this time, no thundering hoofbeats or trumpeted calls-to-arms. But in the quiet country that lies between Washington and the Blue Ridge Mountains, a full-scale battle has been joined. And as was often said about an earlier conflict in these hills and valleys: there ain't nothing civil about it. Today's troops are fighting for economic truth and justice. They are battling about building. Hovering over the whole dispute is this question: Whose history is it, anyway?
BUSINESS
June 14, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Disney Chief Vows Tenacity on Virginia Park: Walt Disney Co. Chairman Michael D. Eisner said he has been surprised by the strong opposition to the company's proposed theme park in Virginia but said he has no intention of dropping the project. "If the people think we will back off, they are mistaken," Eisner told the Washington Post. Eisner said he wants to make the completion of Disney's America, a $650-million theme park focused on U.S. history, the highlight of his chairmanship.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1994 | WILLIAM F. POWERS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Walt Disney Co. is more determined than ever to build its theme park in Prince William County, Va., the company's chairman, Michael D. Eisner, said Monday, expressing outrage at critics who question whether Disney's America is a good idea for the region. Eisner said that if he had foreseen that opposition would be so fierce, he would have delayed the project by a year and taken more time to prepare a public-relations campaign.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the sanctuary of the sparsely settled northern Virginia countryside 40 miles west of Washington, Walt Disney Co. has come to build an entertainment field of dreams. In what could become an important test of Disney's legendary business acumen--not to mention its recently established Washington lobbying office--the entertainment giant is waging a high-stakes battle to transform part of rural Haymarket into a multimillion-dollar, 1,200-acre historical theme park called Disney's America.
SPORTS
July 9, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, Jack Kent Cooke and officials from the Virginia Retirement System will hold a news conference today to unveil plans to build a stadium for the Washington Redskins in Alexandria, Va., team officials said. The plan is being met coolly by local officials, who are concerned about a $125-million requirement from Virginia for costs associated with construction of the 78,000-seat stadium.
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