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Virginia E Johnson

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NEWS
March 7, 1988
Experts have denounced a new study by well-known sex researchers Dr. William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson warning of twice as many heterosexual AIDS carriers as previously estimated and proclaiming the deadly virus can be transmitted by kissing and less intimate contact. The report, to be released today in New York by Masters and Johnson, also called for mandatory testing for the virus causing acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
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BOOKS
March 20, 1988 | Lee Dembart
How much of a threat is AIDS to heterosexuals? Until a year ago, public health officials argued that while the number of cases of heterosexual AIDS was very small, heterosexuals represented the fastest-growing segment of the epidemic and that the number of cases among them would soon begin to rise steeply, following the pattern that homosexuals had experienced a few years before.
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NEWS
March 8, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
A storm of criticism greeted sexuality researchers Dr. William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson on Monday as they formally announced results of a study they say indicates the AIDS virus is "running rampant" among the heterosexual population. Addressing a crowded and highly contentious press conference to introduce their book, "Crisis: Heterosexual Behavior in the Age of AIDS" with co-author Dr. Robert C.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | Associated Press
A three-day international conference to assess the social and economic impact of AIDS opened Tuesday in London with more than 1,000 delegates. On the first day, Dr. Jonathan Mann, director of the World Health Organization's AIDS program, condemned as irresponsible the suggestion by sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson that the disease could be passed by toilet seats and insect bites.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | Associated Press
A three-day international conference to assess the social and economic impact of AIDS opened Tuesday in London with more than 1,000 delegates. On the first day, Dr. Jonathan Mann, director of the World Health Organization's AIDS program, condemned as irresponsible the suggestion by sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson that the disease could be passed by toilet seats and insect bites.
BOOKS
March 20, 1988 | Lee Dembart
How much of a threat is AIDS to heterosexuals? Until a year ago, public health officials argued that while the number of cases of heterosexual AIDS was very small, heterosexuals represented the fastest-growing segment of the epidemic and that the number of cases among them would soon begin to rise steeply, following the pattern that homosexuals had experienced a few years before.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1988
The difficulty of striking an appropriate balance between prudence and panic in containing the AIDS pandemic was well illustrated this week with the release of a book by two noted researchers in the field of sexuality. They have sounded an alarm concerning the spread of the disease through the heterosexual population that suggests dangers that are far greater than any identified by most public-health officials or those already engaged in research. Dr. William H. Masters and Virginia E.
HEALTH
December 20, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, which normally offers images of patients' brains, spinal columns and joints, has now been used by Dutch researchers to view human genitalia during sexual intercourse. Such efforts to learn more about the physiology of the act have a long history. Researchers William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson wired subjects with electrodes decades ago to study the effects of arousal.
OPINION
May 27, 2011
A New York message Re "Medicare plan may have cost GOP a seat," May 25 Democrat Kathy Hochul took a House seat away from the Republicans in a very conservative district in New York, and most folks think it was because Republicans want to turn Medicare into a private voucher program. There were, in fact, many other issues. Polling in the district showed that voters were equally concerned with the lack of jobs created by the newly elected House majority. In addition, voters throughout the country are upset that Republicans refuse to discard the huge tax cut for the very wealthy and their refusal to end big tax breaks for oil companies.
OPINION
March 13, 1988 | David Schulman, David Schulman, a Los Angeles deputy city attorney, heads the city attorney's AIDS Discrimination Unit
In August, 1985, long before Masters and Johnson fanned fears of new AIDS outbreaks, the Los Angeles City Council fashioned the nation's first AIDS anti-discrimination ordinance. Since then numerous cities and counties have passed similar laws and state and federal agencies have included AIDS within existing handicap protections. Laws, not panic, would protect all the people.
NEWS
March 8, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
A storm of criticism greeted sexuality researchers Dr. William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson on Monday as they formally announced results of a study they say indicates the AIDS virus is "running rampant" among the heterosexual population. Addressing a crowded and highly contentious press conference to introduce their book, "Crisis: Heterosexual Behavior in the Age of AIDS" with co-author Dr. Robert C.
NEWS
March 7, 1988
Experts have denounced a new study by well-known sex researchers Dr. William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson warning of twice as many heterosexual AIDS carriers as previously estimated and proclaiming the deadly virus can be transmitted by kissing and less intimate contact. The report, to be released today in New York by Masters and Johnson, also called for mandatory testing for the virus causing acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2004 | Julia Keller, Chicago Tribune
Tupperware may prove instructive here. When you think of how sex and the Midwest are juxtaposed in the public imagination, think of a Tupperware container. To seal the lid, you must run a couple of fingers along the edge, allowing the air inside to exit incrementally. If you just jam the heel of your hand down on one side, the other side will pop up. When you attempt to subdue the second half, the first will break free.
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