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NEWS
July 26, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through the valleys and hollows and along the creeks and wandering country roads, the little mining towns of Appalachia huddle in weary isolation, as if waiting for a thankful nation once again to embrace the power of coal. For more than 100 years, the thick coal-laden seams that reach back into the wooded hills have sustained the men of these coal camps who, like their fathers and grandfathers before them, disappeared each day into the bowels of the earth.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Silicon Valley and many other high-tech centers across the country, northern Virginia--home to America Online Inc., MicroStrategy Inc., Nextel Communications Inc. and 3,000 other tech firms--is undergoing a shakeout. But while Silicon Valley is taking a beating, northern Virginia so far has escaped the worst. When the nationwide high-tech slump knocked Veronica Berry out of her job as an administrative assistant with local wireless telecommunications provider Teligent Inc.
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BUSINESS
April 29, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Silicon Valley and many other high-tech centers across the country, northern Virginia--home to America Online Inc., MicroStrategy Inc., Nextel Communications Inc. and 3,000 other tech firms--is undergoing a shakeout. But while Silicon Valley is taking a beating, northern Virginia so far has escaped the worst. When the nationwide high-tech slump knocked Veronica Berry out of her job as an administrative assistant with local wireless telecommunications provider Teligent Inc.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1994 | MARK BOUSIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle between Walt Disney Co. and community groups in northern Virginia opposed to the company's plan to develop a 1,200-acre historical theme park is heating up as the two sides argue over the number of jobs and the amount of revenue the park would generate.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1994 | MARK BOUSIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battle between Walt Disney Co. and community groups in northern Virginia opposed to the company's plan to develop a 1,200-acre historical theme park is heating up as the two sides argue over the number of jobs and the amount of revenue the park would generate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991
Your article on the tour of the Bill of Rights to Los Angeles by Bob Pool ("Bill of Rights Display Opens to Protests," May 9) provides further grounds for suspicion of "pool reporting." While ostensibly a report about a visit of a historic document to Los Angeles, the article in fact was not much more than a vehicle for the propagation of the anti-smoking movement's now predictable campaign against the Bill of Rights tour. Much play is made in the article suggesting that the tour, sponsored by Philip Morris, was in essence an attempt to advertise cigarettes.
NEWS
January 19, 1992
Your story on Sen. Robert Byrd's pork-barrel politics ("Master of the Game," Jan. 9) overlooks some crucial political and economic realities. West Virginia's moribund economy is partially a result of clean air legislation, which imperiled two of the state's leading industries, coal mining and steel refining. While this legislation was certainly needed, the fact remains that it was federal legislation that put so many West Virginians (including my father) out of work. In the last round of Clean Air Act negotiations, Byrd made a valiant effort to include provisions to provide job retraining and benefits for workers who would lose their jobs as a result of the bill.
SPORTS
December 30, 1988
When Mike Schmidt jumped into Tug McGraw's arms after the final out of the 1980 World Series, it seemed like a spontaneous celebration of the Philadelphia Phillies' victory. It wasn't. It was a calculated move designed to make the cover of Sports Illustrated, Schmidt now says.
NEWS
January 23, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrying a message of job protection to a state where the economy is often perilous, President Bush on Tuesday touted both the White House energy program pending in Congress and the tax cut he pushed into law as vital to fighting the nation's recession.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Tribune Washington Bureau
Republican John Raese hasn't thought much about what role he would play in the U.S. Senate, and acknowledges he doesn't know many of his potential colleagues. "I would have to establish myself before I approached somebody, and they go, 'Well, who's this guy?'" the usually self-confident West Virginia millionaire said in an interview at a supporter's mountain home this week. In fact, though, if Raese makes it to the Senate, his Republican colleagues will know very well who he is. The pro-business stalwart has become a key figure underpinning the GOP's lingering hopes for seizing control of the Senate.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through the valleys and hollows and along the creeks and wandering country roads, the little mining towns of Appalachia huddle in weary isolation, as if waiting for a thankful nation once again to embrace the power of coal. For more than 100 years, the thick coal-laden seams that reach back into the wooded hills have sustained the men of these coal camps who, like their fathers and grandfathers before them, disappeared each day into the bowels of the earth.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | NANCY SHULINS, Associated Press
The secretary of state will see you now. Take a left at the stuffed bear and stop at the smallest, messiest desk in the office. No appointment? No problem. Bringing 31 5-year-olds with you? Come right in. In West Virginia, the secretary of state will see you any time. Bring the kids and he will spend 20 minutes on his 71-year-old knees, passing out stickers of the state flag, explaining his duties, giving an impromptu history lesson. The secretary of state is Ken Hechler.
BOOKS
September 12, 2004 | Eric Foner, Eric Foner, the DeWitt Clinton professor of American History at Columbia University, is the author of "Give Me Liberty!: An American History," "The Story of American Freedom" and "Who Owns History? Rethinking the Past in a Changing World."
Nearly a century and a half after the abolition of slavery, the Old South remains a source of fascination and controversy. Heated debates over issues like reparations, the public display of the Confederate flag, even the nature of Thomas Jefferson's relationship with his slave Sally Hemings, suggest that Americans have yet to arrive at a commonly agreed-upon memory of slavery. But the work of historians of the last 40 years has made clear the centrality of slavery to American history.
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