Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVirginia Education
IN THE NEWS

Virginia Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As California and other states press for better performance from public schools, they may soon discover a lesson that Virginia learned this year the hard way: If you raise academic expectations, prepare at first for failure. Virginia, like California, has adopted detailed new benchmarks for what students should know from grade to grade in English, mathematics, history and science. Here they call them "Standards of Learning."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As California and other states press for better performance from public schools, they may soon discover a lesson that Virginia learned this year the hard way: If you raise academic expectations, prepare at first for failure. Virginia, like California, has adopted detailed new benchmarks for what students should know from grade to grade in English, mathematics, history and science. Here they call them "Standards of Learning."
Advertisement
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Teachers throughout West Virginia returned to their classrooms today after voting overwhelmingly to end an 11-day strike. Unions in 43 of the state's 55 counties voted by large majorities Sunday or early today to accept a back-to-school agreement reached by union leaders and state legislative leaders Saturday. "We've made our point. We won a lot of respect, unity and strength through this," said Jackie Goodwin, a spokeswoman for the 16,000-member West Virginia Education Assn.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Gov. Gaston Caperton and West Virginia's largest teachers union are girding for a showdown today, with the union refusing to end its strike and Caperton warning that teachers who stay off the job can be dismissed. "The law's pretty clear," said Caperton, referring to a state attorney general's ruling that the strike is illegal. The West Virginia Education Assn. had accused the governor of backing off a promise to call a special legislative session to discuss pay if teachers returned to work.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Treasurer A. James Manchin today backed down on his threat to halt all state government checks because of a state Supreme Court decision invalidating the budget. "It's nothing more than a token action to appease the West Virginia Education Assn.," Manchin said of Tuesday's 3-2 ruling by the court, which said the Legislature had appropriated $26 million more than Gov. Arch A. Moore Jr. said would be available. The state constitution requires a balanced budget.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Teachers carried picket signs in nine West Virginia counties in a dispute with the governor and Legislature over a pay raise. Teachers in at least 13 more counties plan to join the state's first school strike today, a West Virginia Education Assn. spokeswoman said. The union, which represents 16,000 of the state's 22,000 public school teachers, says average teacher pay in the state was $21,904, 49th in the nation, before a 5% raise last month.
NEWS
February 24, 1988
The West Virginia Supreme Court declared the state's $1.49-billion budget unconstitutional because it contains a deficit, and the state treasurer said spending would cease immediately even though the court gave officials 60 days to find a solution. The 3-2 decision resulted from a lawsuit brought by the West Virginia Education Assn. last year that challenged cuts in funding for education.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | from Associated Press
The state's two largest teacher unions Saturday urged striking teachers to return to work Monday after reaching a tentative agreement with legislative leaders in the 11-day-old walkout. The agreement came after House Speaker Chuck Chambers and Senate President Keith Burdette said they would recommend that Gov. Gaston Caperton call a special legislative session to address teacher pay and long-term education needs. The teachers had faced increasing pressure from the courts to return to work.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2012 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - As Congress gears up for a fight over possible new gun restrictions, lawmakers in some states have pushed in the opposite direction - to ease gun rules - since the Dec. 14 massacre of 20 first-graders and six women at a school in Newtown, Conn. None exactly matched the proposal Friday by Wayne LaPierre, head of the National Rifle Assn., to train and deploy armed volunteers to help guard schools around the country. Legislation has been proposed, however, to allow teachers or other school workers to carry firearms in schools in at least seven states: Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | MARTHA BRYSON HODEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After 13-year-old Shawn Stacy missed more than 40% of the previous school year, Wayne County Circuit Judge Robert Chafin got tough: He ordered Shawn's unemployed parents to attend classes with their son to ensure that the boy showed up. Operating on the principle that students who skip school now are most likely to drop out later, states are getting tough on truants--and in West Virginia, their parents have to toe the mark as well.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|