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February 23, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making history is a roll of the dice and Virginia's new governor, Lawrence Douglas Wilder, knows it. This elemental lesson rises like vapor from the swampy, treacherous waters of the Old Dominion's politics, where the bones of losers are picked clean and dumped in the murky depths of oblivion. Of course, obscurity is the least of Democrat Wilder's worries at the moment.
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NATIONAL
October 13, 2013 | By Evan Halper
RICHMOND, Va. - Ken Cuccinelli is running for governor, not Congress, but the Virginia Republican is struggling to dodge the political fallout from Capitol Hill. His campaign in this crucial battleground state is in danger of becoming the first political casualty of the federal government shutdown, which Americans largely blame on Republicans. With the election just weeks away, Cuccinelli's poll numbers have tumbled since federal agencies were closed Oct. 1. The conservative state attorney general was already lagging, but he went from within striking distance of a vulnerable Democrat to trailing by 8 to 10 percentage points in three independent polls.
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NATIONAL
October 13, 2013 | By Evan Halper
RICHMOND, Va. - Ken Cuccinelli is running for governor, not Congress, but the Virginia Republican is struggling to dodge the political fallout from Capitol Hill. His campaign in this crucial battleground state is in danger of becoming the first political casualty of the federal government shutdown, which Americans largely blame on Republicans. With the election just weeks away, Cuccinelli's poll numbers have tumbled since federal agencies were closed Oct. 1. The conservative state attorney general was already lagging, but he went from within striking distance of a vulnerable Democrat to trailing by 8 to 10 percentage points in three independent polls.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Making history is a roll of the dice and Virginia's new governor, Lawrence Douglas Wilder, knows it. This elemental lesson rises like vapor from the swampy, treacherous waters of the Old Dominion's politics, where the bones of losers are picked clean and dumped in the murky depths of oblivion. Of course, obscurity is the least of Democrat Wilder's worries at the moment.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Republican Gov. George F. Allen delivered a sharply partisan attack on the state government over which he just took control, promising to transform a bloated bureaucracy with his own brand of "creative conservatism." Declaring his landslide victory "the most dramatic call for change we have seen in modern times in Virginia," Allen pledged in his inaugural speech in Richmond to wrest Virginia's government from the "stolid, status quo, monarchical elitists."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Rep. Norman Sisisky, a conservative Virginia Democrat who was a strong advocate for defense spending during nine terms in Congress, died Thursday. He was 73. Sisisky, a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee, died at his home in Petersburg two days after he was released from a hospital following lung cancer surgery, his office announced.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven men with connections to an anti-government West Virginia militia--including its leader and a local firefighter--were arrested Friday on charges of conspiring to blow up the FBI's new national fingerprint records facility. The arrests were made early Friday after members of the West Virginia Mountaineer Militia allegedly began assembling large amounts of plastic explosives, TNT and blasting caps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1995 | From Associated Press
As students return to campus this fall, American colleges are struggling to interpret a Supreme Court ruling that cleared the way for the public funding of religious activity. In a decision that some legal experts believe will lead to the end of mandatory student fees, the court ruled this summer that the University of Virginia wrongly denied funding to Wide Awake, a student-run Christian magazine.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of the last three years, the Israelis and Palestinians were so estranged that about the only time their negotiators talked to each other was when U.S. envoy Dennis B. Ross convened the meeting. Now, with a new Israeli leader in office and the two sides meeting more regularly, Ross is playing a more subtle behind-the-scenes role.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON and PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) predicted Monday that Congress will pass a constitutional amendment this year that would require the federal government to produce a balanced budget. Although Foley is personally cool to the idea and warned of potentially dire consequences in terms of tax increases and program cuts, aides said that his prediction on a visit to constituents here was based on strong and increasing support among many liberal Democrats as well as conservatives. Sen.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of scandal-induced paralysis, the second-term administration exodus clearly has resumed. Last week, President Clinton's budget director called it quits. On Friday, senior aide and longtime pal Thomas "Mack" McLarty announced that he, too, was leaving. And more are expected to follow.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright heads to the Middle East this week for meetings that could set the tone for U.S. involvement in the troubled region for the rest of the Clinton administration, and possibly years longer. Israel and the Palestinians--negotiating without direct U.S. involvement for the first time in almost four years--are closing in on an interim peace agreement that probably will be signed shortly after Albright arrives.
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