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BUSINESS
April 29, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Silicon Valley and many other high-tech centers across the country, northern Virginia--home to America Online Inc., MicroStrategy Inc., Nextel Communications Inc. and 3,000 other tech firms--is undergoing a shakeout. But while Silicon Valley is taking a beating, northern Virginia so far has escaped the worst. When the nationwide high-tech slump knocked Veronica Berry out of her job as an administrative assistant with local wireless telecommunications provider Teligent Inc.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
On the eve of the release of Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell touted the bipartisan benefits of Virginia's budding film industry. "The increase in jobs and revenue from Virginia's film industry is encouraging and demonstrates the effectiveness of our state's incentive programs for film production," McDonnell said in a news conference at the historic Byrd Theatre in Richmond, Va., prior to a special screening of "Lincoln" hosted by the Virginia Film Office and the Virginia Tourism Corporation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
On the eve of the release of Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell touted the bipartisan benefits of Virginia's budding film industry. "The increase in jobs and revenue from Virginia's film industry is encouraging and demonstrates the effectiveness of our state's incentive programs for film production," McDonnell said in a news conference at the historic Byrd Theatre in Richmond, Va., prior to a special screening of "Lincoln" hosted by the Virginia Film Office and the Virginia Tourism Corporation.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Silicon Valley and many other high-tech centers across the country, northern Virginia--home to America Online Inc., MicroStrategy Inc., Nextel Communications Inc. and 3,000 other tech firms--is undergoing a shakeout. But while Silicon Valley is taking a beating, northern Virginia so far has escaped the worst. When the nationwide high-tech slump knocked Veronica Berry out of her job as an administrative assistant with local wireless telecommunications provider Teligent Inc.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | Associated Press
Rep. Thomas J. Bliley, an ally of Virginia's tobacco industry and chairman of the powerful committee that handles tobacco legislation, won't seek reelection this year, sources said Monday. The 68-year-old Republican plans to announce Wednesday that he will not seek an 11th term, according to two sources within the GOP who spoke on condition of anonymity. Bliley becomes the 30th House member--23 Republicans and seven Democrats--to announce he will not seek reelection this fall.
NEWS
October 25, 1985 | SANDRA SUGAWARA, The Washington Post
A decade ago in July, Virginia health authorities closed a small chemical plant in the town of Hopewell, an action that led to the discovery of what officials were to call the worst environmental disaster in the state's history. The plant, actually a converted gasoline station, produced a grayish white, powdery pesticide called Kepone, and soon after the tiny Life Science Products Co.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2004 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
California's manufacturing sector ended 2003 on a strong note and appears poised for a rebound this year, according to a survey of purchasing managers released Thursday. Chapman University's quarterly index of factory activity increased to 63.9 in the three months ended in December, up from 63.2 in the third quarter. A value above 50 indicates that the manufacturing sector is growing, while a level below that suggests contraction.
NEWS
June 20, 1989 | From Associated Press
Wildcat strikes hit coal fields in four more states Monday, keeping a third of the nation's union miners out of work despite a back-to-work request by United Mine Workers leadership, a union official said Monday. "Telegrams have gone out," said UMW Vice President Cecil Roberts, breaking the union's long silence on the impromptu strikes that have shut down more than 300 mines. "I'm sure that that has taken place throughout the union." Despite the order, mines in Alabama, Illinois, Missouri and Ohio were hit Monday for the first time, bringing out 5,000 more United Mine Workers members in a sympathy walkout for striking Pittston Coal Group employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2010 | By Johanna Neuman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Robert Carlyle Byrd, the West Virginia Democrat who was often called the conscience of the Senate for his devotion to the system of constitutional checks and balances and the prerogatives of power, died early Monday. He was 92. Byrd, who served longer and cast more congressional votes than any other member of Congress in U.S. history since taking office in January 1959, died at Inova Hospital in Fairfax, Va., a family spokesman said. He was admitted to the hospital late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration as a result of the high temperatures in the capital.
NEWS
March 6, 2002 | WARREN VIETH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced plans Tuesday to impose tariffs of up to 30% on imported steel products, a protective move that will ripple through the U.S. economy and roil domestic and international politics. The rescue plan, which takes effect March 20 and phases out after three years, is designed to buy time for struggling U.S. steelmakers to retool themselves to compete more effectively against heavily protected foreign producers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Pocahontas Medicine Woman, Spy, Entrepreneur, Diplomat Paula Gunn Allen HarperSanFrancisco: 350 pp., $26.95 * IN her new book, "Pocahontas," Paula Gunn Allen tries to convey the spirit world of Native Americans by inviting the reader to inhabit it with her. A retired professor of English and American Indian Studies at UCLA and author of "The Sacred Hoop," Allen is no outsider, viewing Native Americans' imagination and world view as a detached observer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
Given that Steven Spielberg's historical drama "Lincoln" combines one of Hollywood's biggest directors and one of America's greatest heroes, it's not hard to imagine the result being an epic, reverential portrait of the 16th president. Instead, however, Spielberg, screenwriter Tony Kushner and star Daniel Day-Lewis have treated Lincoln as more man than myth and focused on the political wrangling he orchestrated to end the Civil War and pass the 13th Amendment outlawing slavery. The decision seems to have been a shrewd one, as critics are nearly unanimous in praising the film.
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