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Virginia Kelley

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NEWS
January 7, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virginia Kelley, a woman of unquenchable optimism and flamboyant spirit who buried three husbands, battled breast cancer and saw her elder son elected President of the United States, died in her sleep early Thursday in Hot Springs, Ark., at age 70. Active until the end, despite a recurrence of her cancer several months ago, Kelley had spent Christmas at the White House and New Year's Eve in Las Vegas, where she watched Barbra Streisand perform.
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NEWS
October 19, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton's mother, Virginia Kelley, was dying of breast cancer 4 1/2 years ago, she avoided telling friends, instead maintaining a sunny-side-up disposition that had served her well through a lifetime of adversity. "She never told anyone she was dying. Obviously she knew," recalled Thomas Caplan, a novelist who was close both to Kelley and her son Bill. "It was so classy in a way. She was never going to admit defeat and never going to give up."
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NEWS
January 9, 1994 | from Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several thousand mourners, including neighbors, government officials and Hollywood figures, joined President Clinton on Saturday at the funeral of his mother, Virginia Kelley, who was eulogized as "a celebration on the way to heaven." The flamboyant Kelley, who died Thursday from complications of breast cancer, was so popular that the service was conducted at the 3,000-seat civic auditorium in Clinton's boyhood home, rather than at a church.
NEWS
January 9, 1994 | from Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several thousand mourners, including neighbors, government officials and Hollywood figures, joined President Clinton on Saturday at the funeral of his mother, Virginia Kelley, who was eulogized as "a celebration on the way to heaven." The flamboyant Kelley, who died Thursday from complications of breast cancer, was so popular that the service was conducted at the 3,000-seat civic auditorium in Clinton's boyhood home, rather than at a church.
NEWS
October 19, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Clinton's mother, Virginia Kelley, was dying of breast cancer 4 1/2 years ago, she avoided telling friends, instead maintaining a sunny-side-up disposition that had served her well through a lifetime of adversity. "She never told anyone she was dying. Obviously she knew," recalled Thomas Caplan, a novelist who was close both to Kelley and her son Bill. "It was so classy in a way. She was never going to admit defeat and never going to give up."
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | Associated Press
President Clinton has carried through Europe a copy of his mother's autobiography that she gave him shortly before her death Jan. 6. "He's reading through it and reviewing it," a White House aide said Saturday, speaking on condition of anonymity. Clinton left for his European tour hours after attending the funeral of Virginia Kelley in Hot Springs, Ark.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | Washington Post
President Clinton returned to his birthplace Thursday to bury one of the only father figures he has ever known. He was "a man without wealth or power and without position or any pretense, but who . . . was smart and wise, profoundly good," said Clinton in eulogizing his great-uncle Henry Oren "Buddy" Grisham, who died Monday at 92.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | ROY RIVENBURG
Socks: White House cat. Most photographed feline since Morris. Terrified of the President, according to astrologer Sydney Omarr. Bill Clinton: Certified fan of both Fleetwood and Big Macs. Fifth southpaw to become President. Ex-brunet. Has never "inhaled." Hillary Rodham Clinton: Chocolate-chip cookie whiz. Another ex-brunette. Big on children's rights--unless it's Chelsea's right to have pierced ears. Chelsea Clinton: Named for song "Chelsea Morning." Ballet lover.
SPORTS
January 24, 1993 | Associated Press
Mrs. Virginia Kelley, mother of President Bill Clinton, closed her inaugural week in Washington with a visit to Laurel Race Course on Saturday. Kelley was given a tour of the facility by track executives, and got a tip from trainer Eddie Gaudet for the fourth race on the 12-race card. Gaudet's horse, Yen Of The Irish, won and paid $7. Track officials said Kelley bet on the horse, but they did not know how much. "I'm enjoying the afternoon," Kelley said. "I enjoy horse racing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1994
Tip O'Neill was the very image of the portly, cigar-smoking (Cuban, preferably) back-room politician. He cared more about cutting the deal than writing legislation, and was an Irish American from a state where ethnicity once defined politics. When he succeeded John F. Kennedy in the House in 1952, the conventional wisdom was that the Massachusetts legislator, though locally powerful, was merely keeping the "Kennedy seat" warm. What an underestimation.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virginia Kelley, a woman of unquenchable optimism and flamboyant spirit who buried three husbands, battled breast cancer and saw her elder son elected President of the United States, died in her sleep early Thursday in Hot Springs, Ark., at age 70. Active until the end, despite a recurrence of her cancer several months ago, Kelley had spent Christmas at the White House and New Year's Eve in Las Vegas, where she watched Barbra Streisand perform.
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Clinton spent Friday visiting with family and friends as hundreds of mourners from around the country gathered for the funeral today of his mother, Virginia Kelley. After a 15-minute morning visit to the funeral home, Clinton was seen comforting his tearful half brother, Roger, 37, as the pair left the home. Clinton, wearing a brown leather jacket, put his arm around his weeping younger brother. With them at the Gross Funeral Home for a private viewing was Mrs.
SPORTS
January 12, 1994 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeff Lukas, recovering from injuries suffered when he was knocked down by a runaway horse in the barn area at Santa Anita on Dec. 15, is no longer in a coma and has been shifted from intensive care to a private hospital room, a spokeswoman for the Wayne Lukas Racing Stable said Tuesday. "Jeff has been improving daily," Peggy Yost said. "He has been recognizing voices and there has been considerable movement of his hands. He is not talking.
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