Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVirginia Laws
IN THE NEWS

Virginia Laws

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | From The Washington Post
Just before midnight Tuesday, a federal judge reversed a lower court ruling and preserved--at least for now--Virginia's new ban on late-term, "partial-birth" abortions. J. Michael Luttig, a 44-year-old federal appeals judge from McLean, Va., known for his conservative philosophy, rejected a federal district court judge's ruling that the Virginia ban was too vague and likely unconstitutional. Luttig's ruling, which abortion rights advocates said they will appeal, put Virginia's U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Americans do not have a right to obtain public records from states other than their own, the Supreme Court ruled Monday, dealing a setback to businesses and researchers who gather data across the nation. The unanimous decision upheld laws in Virginia and a handful of other states that release some public records only to their own citizens. "This is disappointing. We have a national information economy now, and all sorts of activities depend on data from all 50 states," said Washington attorney Deepak Gupta, who represented two men who had challenged the "citizens only" provision of Virginia's public records law. Despite the ruling, Gupta said the trend has been for states to open their public records on an equal basis.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The Virginia Senate voted Friday to let Fairfax County prohibit its residents from sleeping anywhere but their bedrooms, a measure that some activists and local officials say unfairly targets the living arrangements of the county's burgeoning immigrant communities. The bill passed by a vote of 20-9 after a spirited debate that pitted proponents from Northern Virginia against colleagues from across the state.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
A Virginia judge has rejected an attempt by Texas Gov. Rick Perry and other Republican presidential hopefuls to challenge the constitutionality of the state's rules governing ballot access, citing the timeliness of the case. In a suit filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia last month, Perry's camp had argued that state rules "unconstitutionally restrict the rights of candidates and voters by severely restricting access to the ballot. " At issue is state law that requires a candidate to get 10,000 petition signatures statewide, including a certain number in each of the state's congressional districts.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | Associated Press
The city has agreed to pay $100,000 each to two Muslim women who were arrested for wearing religious veils in public. Najla E. Doran and Sherma D. Humphrey were charged with violating a state law prohibiting the wearing of masks in public. But people who wear masks for religious reasons are exempt under the law, which was aimed at Ku Klux Klan marchers. "We wish it had never happened," City Atty. Timothy Oksman said Thursday.
NEWS
October 1, 1994 | From the Washington Post
The Virginia General Assembly approved the most sweeping overhaul of the state's criminal justice system in decades Friday as it abolished parole and increased sentences for violent criminals. The crime plan that emerged from a two-week special session was in most respects the same one introduced by Gov. George F. Allen, and its passage was a major triumph for the law-and-order Republican, who came into office in January promising to "stop the bleeding."
NATIONAL
August 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
An appeals court Wednesday upheld a Virginia law that requires public schools to lead a daily recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, rejecting a claim that its reference to God was an unconstitutional promotion of religion. A suit filed by Edward Myers of Sterling, Va., a father of three, raised the objection to the phrase "one nation under God." A three-judge panel of the U.S.
SPORTS
April 8, 1990 | ANGUS PHILLIPS, WASHINGTON POST
The folks at Virginia's Wildlife Violation Hotline have answered some unusual calls in their time, but they'd never before handled a complaint quite like Joe Ficarro's. "I'd like to report a hunting violation," said the 40-year-old Virginia Beach taxidermist when he rang up in February. "Sir, when and where did the violation occur?" "Tomorrow," said Ficarro, "in Pungo." Ficarro explained that he'd be the violator and wanted to make sure a game warden was around to catch him hunting on Sunday.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
A Virginia judge has rejected an attempt by Texas Gov. Rick Perry and other Republican presidential hopefuls to challenge the constitutionality of the state's rules governing ballot access, citing the timeliness of the case. In a suit filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia last month, Perry's camp had argued that state rules "unconstitutionally restrict the rights of candidates and voters by severely restricting access to the ballot. " At issue is state law that requires a candidate to get 10,000 petition signatures statewide, including a certain number in each of the state's congressional districts.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1995 | JOSEF FEDERMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Most auto parts shops in West Virginia never saw it coming: Suddenly, the Legislature blacklisted many of the bumpers, fenders, hoods and doors in their garages. A new state law similar to one in Rhode Island requires auto repair shops to use factory parts to fix the body of newer vehicles, effectively limiting the market for less expensive imitation parts carried by many shops.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2010 | Tom Hamburger, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Justice Department has launched a criminal investigation into the explosion at Massey Energy Co.'s Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia, law enforcement sources said Friday. The case originated in the U.S. attorney's office in the Southern District of West Virginia, which has prosecuted the coal company for criminal violations of safety standards in the past. A spokesman for that office referred questions to the Justice Department's press office in Washington, which declined to comment.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
An appeals court Wednesday upheld a Virginia law that requires public schools to lead a daily recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, rejecting a claim that its reference to God was an unconstitutional promotion of religion. A suit filed by Edward Myers of Sterling, Va., a father of three, raised the objection to the phrase "one nation under God." A three-judge panel of the U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | From the Washington Post
Virginia lawmakers approved a bill Thursday that would revive a ban on the procedure opponents call "partial-birth" abortion and make the state the first to outlaw such abortions since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down bans adopted by 31 states. The bill would make it illegal for doctors to perform "medically induced infanticide." A doctor who violates the ban could face up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $100,000.
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small cluster of men had been hanging out in the parking lot next to the Arlington, Va., Department of Motor Vehicles office for at least four months, helping anyone who needed it--usually illegal immigrants--get a driver's license or a state identification card for a small fee, usually $100 or less. So it wasn't unusual when, on Aug. 2, they were approached by "three Arab males" in a van seeking their services.
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The Virginia Senate voted Friday to let Fairfax County prohibit its residents from sleeping anywhere but their bedrooms, a measure that some activists and local officials say unfairly targets the living arrangements of the county's burgeoning immigrant communities. The bill passed by a vote of 20-9 after a spirited debate that pitted proponents from Northern Virginia against colleagues from across the state.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | Associated Press
The city has agreed to pay $100,000 each to two Muslim women who were arrested for wearing religious veils in public. Najla E. Doran and Sherma D. Humphrey were charged with violating a state law prohibiting the wearing of masks in public. But people who wear masks for religious reasons are exempt under the law, which was aimed at Ku Klux Klan marchers. "We wish it had never happened," City Atty. Timothy Oksman said Thursday.
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small cluster of men had been hanging out in the parking lot next to the Arlington, Va., Department of Motor Vehicles office for at least four months, helping anyone who needed it--usually illegal immigrants--get a driver's license or a state identification card for a small fee, usually $100 or less. So it wasn't unusual when, on Aug. 2, they were approached by "three Arab males" in a van seeking their services.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Americans do not have a right to obtain public records from states other than their own, the Supreme Court ruled Monday, dealing a setback to businesses and researchers who gather data across the nation. The unanimous decision upheld laws in Virginia and a handful of other states that release some public records only to their own citizens. "This is disappointing. We have a national information economy now, and all sorts of activities depend on data from all 50 states," said Washington attorney Deepak Gupta, who represented two men who had challenged the "citizens only" provision of Virginia's public records law. Despite the ruling, Gupta said the trend has been for states to open their public records on an equal basis.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | From The Washington Post
Just before midnight Tuesday, a federal judge reversed a lower court ruling and preserved--at least for now--Virginia's new ban on late-term, "partial-birth" abortions. J. Michael Luttig, a 44-year-old federal appeals judge from McLean, Va., known for his conservative philosophy, rejected a federal district court judge's ruling that the Virginia ban was too vague and likely unconstitutional. Luttig's ruling, which abortion rights advocates said they will appeal, put Virginia's U.S.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1995 | JOSEF FEDERMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Most auto parts shops in West Virginia never saw it coming: Suddenly, the Legislature blacklisted many of the bumpers, fenders, hoods and doors in their garages. A new state law similar to one in Rhode Island requires auto repair shops to use factory parts to fix the body of newer vehicles, effectively limiting the market for less expensive imitation parts carried by many shops.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|