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Virginia Madsen

ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1991 | IRV LETOFSKY
"Victim of Love" (at 9 p.m. Sunday on Channels 2 and 8) is misnomered. It ought to be "Victim of Sex," which not only would work better for the ratings sweeps but also is more to the point. Pierce Brosnan portrays the hypotenuse of a triangle as Professor Paul, an Edgar Allan Poe scholar who drops Poe-etic passages at the drop of an eyelid. Playing the angles are JoBeth Williams as therapist Tess and Virginia Madsen as moony Carla.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2009 | Patrick Kevin Day
It took a heck of a lot more than a CD of haunted house sounds to give "The Haunting in Connecticut" its bumps in the night. Though nowhere did the postproduction work stand out more than in the climactic basement scene in which the undead spirit emerges from its sealed room to loom over Virginia Madsen. "That's a scene that was created absolutely from scratch," says editor Tom Elkins, who also created sound effects tracks with sound designer James Wallace.
NEWS
November 6, 1993
A private memorial service for Duncan Gibbins, the British director and screenwriter who died Wednesday of burns suffered while he was trying to save a cat during the Calabasas/Malibu fire, will be held today at the Writers Guild Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Highlander 2: The Quickening" (citywide) improves upon the original. This doesn't mean that it's anywhere near a classic of time-travel fantasy adventure. Rather, as both prequel and sequel, it makes clearer much that was so vague in the original; it even jokes about how confusing its premise is. In short, audiences who made the first film successful enough to warrant a second will be getting a bit more for their money.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Movies about famous writers' lives are rarely satisfying. It may make dramatic sense that a writer's work and a writer's life should be depicted as all-of-a-piece but things rarely work out so neatly in the real world. What we too often get at the movies is a diminishing of both the life and the art. In the case of Colette, the temptation to connect her life and her art is especially understandable since so much of what she wrote made the connection for us anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1995 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's the ultimate statement for our era of diminished expectations: "Heaven isn't heaven anymore," laments the angel Simon (Eric Stolz) early on in the frankly bizarre religious thriller "The Prophecy." Seems even God has trouble finding good help these days. The angel Gabriel (Christopher Walken), upset that God doesn't hold him in such high favor anymore (apparently, heaven isn't above office politics), is planning a palace coup.
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