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HOME & GARDEN
November 20, 2003 | Todd Henneman, Special to The Times
The scene is pure Italy, the setting pure Beverly Hills. Amid six acres once owned by a department store heir, a Renaissance garden has been reborn. The restoration of the Italian terrace, one of five areas of the Virginia Robinson Gardens, is about 80% complete. The grounds surround the mansion built after Virginia and Henry Winchester Robinson, heir to the J.W. Robinson stores, married in 1903.
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HOME & GARDEN
November 20, 2003 | Todd Henneman, Special to The Times
The scene is pure Italy, the setting pure Beverly Hills. Amid six acres once owned by a department store heir, a Renaissance garden has been reborn. The restoration of the Italian terrace, one of five areas of the Virginia Robinson Gardens, is about 80% complete. The grounds surround the mansion built after Virginia and Henry Winchester Robinson, heir to the J.W. Robinson stores, married in 1903.
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NEWS
November 3, 1991 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cowabunga floribunda? Could the gardens of a regal Beverly Hills estate be of interest to a pack of energetic children weaned on Ninja Turtles and Terminators? Judging from the Virginia Robinson Gardens' plan for a hands-on tour for third-graders, they will. What's a fancy garden anyway but an excuse for big people to dig in the dirt? The Robinson Gardens, a historic 6.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cowabunga floribunda? Could the gardens of a regal Beverly Hills estate be of interest to a pack of energetic children weaned on Ninja Turtles and Terminators? Judging from the Virginia Robinson Gardens' plan for a hands-on tour for third-graders, they will. What's a fancy garden anyway but an excuse for big people to dig in the dirt? The Robinson Gardens, a historic 6.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of the Virginia Robinson Gardens are mobilizing to defend their green little corner of Beverly Hills against a proposal to merge it with the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. The Robinson Gardens are already a county-owned facility, part of the Department of Arboreta and Botanic Gardens.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | Sam Hall Kaplan
There are scattered throughout Los Angeles what I would describe as semi-secret public places; mostly out-of-the-way settings, accessible to all, that evoke a simpler, more gracious time and an appreciation of the city's unusual landscape and benign climate. It was these settings decades ago that lent Los Angeles a pastoral, genteel image, generating such descriptions as the New Eden or the American Riviera and attracting waves of settlers seeking a more relaxed and healthful life style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1997
Perhaps the good citizens opposing Val Verde ("The Manor Scorned," May 6) should take a look at the Virginia Robinson Gardens in Beverly Hills. Open for tours only by appointment a few hours a week, it hardly creates a tourist rush. The day we were there, only nine people were on the tour. Insulting history and botany buffs with statements like "you don't put a toilet in the middle of the living room" takes NIMBY to a new low. LINDA SHAHINIAN Culver City
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995
1008 Elden Way, Beverly Hills One of the least-known Southern California delights is the Virginia Robinson Gardens, tucked in a cul-de-sac overlooking the Beverly Hills Hotel. The 6.2 acres was once a barren hillside and was transformed into a fantasy of palm-shaded fern groves, emerald lawns and flower beds by Harry and Virginia Robinson, scion of the Robinson's department store clan. Visitors must call for reservations: (310) 276-5367.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky has appointed an Agoura Hills man to the Board of Governors of the county's arboretums and botanic gardens. James E. Larson, who owns an Agoura Hills-based landscape architect firm, is the former chairman of that city's Design Review Board, and has also served on the Westwood Design Review Board.
NEWS
March 21, 1985
Shocking pink azaleas and red camellias in full bloom--a sure sign of springtime in Southern California--greeted amateur and professional gardeners from across the country visiting Los Angeles on Wednesday for the American Horticultural Society's annual spring symposium.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of the Virginia Robinson Gardens are mobilizing to defend their green little corner of Beverly Hills against a proposal to merge it with the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. The Robinson Gardens are already a county-owned facility, part of the Department of Arboreta and Botanic Gardens.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | Sam Hall Kaplan
There are scattered throughout Los Angeles what I would describe as semi-secret public places; mostly out-of-the-way settings, accessible to all, that evoke a simpler, more gracious time and an appreciation of the city's unusual landscape and benign climate. It was these settings decades ago that lent Los Angeles a pastoral, genteel image, generating such descriptions as the New Eden or the American Riviera and attracting waves of settlers seeking a more relaxed and healthful life style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1991
Kenneth C. Smith, former president of Cypress Gardens in Winter Haven, Fla., was named Tuesday by the county Board of Supervisors to head the Los Angeles County Department of Arboreta and Botanic Gardens. Smith, 58, will be paid $90,000 a year to run the county arboretum in Arcadia, Descanso Gardens in La Canada-Flintridge, South Coast Botanic Gardens in Palos Verdes and the Virginia Robinson Gardens in Beverly Hills. Smith worked 40 years at Cypress Gardens, a 223-acre park that has 1.
NEWS
August 15, 1993
In an attempt to make the Arboretum and other county botanical gardens more self-sufficient, entrance fees will increase beginning Sept. 1. As the County Board of Supervisors discussed slashing the county's budget last month, the closure of Arboretum was suggested as one way to save money. At the Arboretum, 301 N. Baldwin Ave., general admission for adults will increase from $3.50 to $5. Senior citizens and students with school identification will pay $3.50 instead of $1.50.
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