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NEWS
January 17, 1994 | RUDY ABRAMSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It used to require a special occasion for folks in Leesburg to travel to Washington. And only on weekends and summer sojourns did residents of the nation's capital come out to this picturesque old town in the foothills of the Blue Ridge. It was not intended to be a suburb. It was not created with the automobile in mind.
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NEWS
January 17, 1994 | RUDY ABRAMSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It used to require a special occasion for folks in Leesburg to travel to Washington. And only on weekends and summer sojourns did residents of the nation's capital come out to this picturesque old town in the foothills of the Blue Ridge. It was not intended to be a suburb. It was not created with the automobile in mind.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 1998 | Dow Jones
A Fluor Daniel venture with Morrison Knudsen Co. received a $308-million contract from Virginia's Transportation Department for the design and construction of a high-level river crossing in Richmond, Va. The venture is 60% owned by Fluor Daniel, a unit of Irvine-based Fluor Corp. and 40% by Morrison Knudsen. Fluor Daniel said the venture will design and build an 8.8-mile, four-lane highway and bridge over the James River to link Virginia 150 and Interstate 295.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1999 | John O'Dell
Odetics Inc. said its Odetics ITS intelligent transportation system subsidiary has been named the prime contractor to provide technical support to the Virginia Department of Transportation for setting up a statewide system to manage traffic and provide information to travelers. The three-year contract is worth $6 million but has two one-year options that could boost the total value to $10 million, Anaheim-based Odetics said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
Beaver populations have grown so strong and pervasive that they are causing what the U.S. Department of Agriculture calls "epidemic" destruction of private property, crops and roads. The USDA is recommending a "beaver damage management plan" for Virginia, in which localities, state agencies and landowners work together and share costs to contain the tree-gnawing mammals.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2010 | By Richard Simon
In the wake of "Snowmageddon," the blizzard that paralyzed the mid-Atlantic region, officials Thursday turned to the mammoth task of digging out, challenged by the logistical problem of where to dump mountains of snow. "There is so much snow that there is nowhere to push it," said Esther Bowring, a spokeswoman for the Montgomery County government in Maryland, which is hauling snow to parks. Although airports reopened Thursday, the federal government remained shut for a fourth straight day, and many schools are closed.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
A wet, slushy snowstorm swept up the East Coast on Thursday, closing schools and highways and causing scores of accidents, including a deadly 116-car pileup outside the nation's capital. At least one person was killed in the huge crash on Interstate 95 near Quantico, about 40 miles south of Washington, Virginia state police said. More than 100 people were injured as the wind-driven snow dropped visibility to near zero. One official said the wreckage stretched over three miles.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2006 | Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun
If you are reading this article while cruising down the road, please don't. According to a research project that trained 100 "candid cameras" on motorists for more than a year, reading while driving increases the risk of a crash or near-crash more than threefold.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Thousands of people die in car crashes each year because drivers were too distracted by their cellphones to pay attention to the road. A pair of researchers from West Virginia University have a radical proposal for reducing that death toll - equip cars with devices that make it impossible to send a text message, check your favorite traffic app or dial home while the car is in motion. “Simply stated, handheld portable devices must be rendered unoperable whenever the automobile is in motion or when the transmission shaft lever is in forward or reverse gear,” they wrote in a Viewpoint essay in Wednesday's edition of the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Right on schedule, two hulking green-and-white commuter trains, each of them two stories tall and two blocks long, pulled in along each side of Platform 5 in Toronto's aging but elegant Union Station. In two minutes, the trains deposited about 2,000 passengers in the terminal, a short stroll to many downtown buildings and just steps from the subway, streetcars and buses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2004 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Like many of the 170 million cellphone owners across the nation, Karen Cooper enjoys using hers while driving. During her grinding, sometimes hourlong evening commute from West Los Angeles to her home in Torrance, she can often be found with an ear bud wire dangling from her curly hair. "When you're sitting in traffic, it just gives you time to catch up with people," said Cooper, 38, who uses a hands-free device because she believes it's safer.
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