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Virginia Watson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2007 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
Virginia Watson first traveled to Chatsworth as a teenager, making the drive with friends and family nearly 70 years ago from her home in Highland Park to a cabin in what was then a far-flung community of ranches and orange groves. Sixty-eight years later, Watson is so closely identified with the community she adopted as her own that locals view her as its matriarch -- and head historian. "She is Ms. Chatsworth," said Andre van der Valk, a co-president of the Chatsworth Historical Society.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2007 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
Virginia Watson first traveled to Chatsworth as a teenager, making the drive with friends and family nearly 70 years ago from her home in Highland Park to a cabin in what was then a far-flung community of ranches and orange groves. Sixty-eight years later, Watson is so closely identified with the community she adopted as her own that locals view her as its matriarch -- and head historian. "She is Ms. Chatsworth," said Andre van der Valk, a co-president of the Chatsworth Historical Society.
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NEWS
October 9, 2007
Chatsworth museum: An article in Monday's California section on the renaming of the Chatsworth Museum as the Virginia Watson Chatsworth Museum said Virginia Watson "read a column in the local newspaper mentioning her family as the first English-speaking settlers in Chatsworth in 1874." In fact, Watson read a column written by Katherine Johnson, who wrote about her own family -- the Johnson family -- as the first English-speaking settlers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1994
The curator of the Chatsworth Museum, Virginia Watson, has lived here for more than 40 years. She has one overriding wish for her community. "I want people to know that we're here," Watson says. She also wants people to know that Chatsworth has been "here" for a long time, "that we're historic." Since the 1960s, Watson has collected photographs and crafts of the pioneers who settled Chatsworth in the 1880's.
MAGAZINE
September 8, 1991 | Celeste Fremon, Celeste Fremon was a member of USC's first song girl squad in 1967.
TO MOST AMERICANS, JANUARY 17, 1991, MARKED THE FIRST terrible but riveting 24 hours that the United States was at war with the Republic of Iraq. However, for the 3,500 or so fans who streamed into the Los Angeles Sports Arena that night, the date had another significance. It was the USC vs. Cal Berkeley basketball game and the debut of the 1991 University of Southern California song girls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997 | ED BOND
When the Chatsworth Rail Station was dedicated a year ago, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans rode the train into the station to their signature tune, "Happy Trails to You." The song was written by Evans, and the books she wrote occupy at least half a shelf at the Homestead Museum at Chatsworth Park South. They are one of many signs that the king and queen of film westerns have had a long and friendly association with the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1998
A memorial service honoring the late Roy Rogers, who lived in Chatsworth with his wife, Dale Evans, from 1954 to 1965, will be held Saturday at the Pioneer Church. Three Chatsworth-area groups--the Chatsworth Historical Society, Oakwood Memorial Park and St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Catholic Church--organized the service in response to calls from Valley residents, said Virginia Watson, curator of the Chatsworth Museum and member of the historical society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1995 | DAVID E. BRADY
She's not retiring, Virginia Watson says. After 32 years with the Chatsworth Historical Society, an organization she helped found, Watson is stepping down as curator but insists that she'll still be involved in their activities. "I'm getting older," the 74-year-old Chatsworth resident said Wednesday. "It's harder for me to do a lot of the physical things."
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The legend of the King of Cowboys lives on in the rocky crags of the hills here. Even though Roy Rogers moved from the San Fernando Valley more than three decades ago, his mark is still visible, particularly at the sprawling pink ranch house at the top of Trigger Street. Once a 300-acre ranch, most of the property is now developed with luxury custom homes, many with commanding views of the Valley below.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The condition of convicted "pillowcase rapist" Reginald Muldrew continued to improve Saturday at a hospital in Gary, Ind. So did the condition of the case against him that is being mounted by Gary police. Investigators said they will ask prosecutors Monday to charge the 48-year-old Muldrew with robbery stemming from the Aug. 5 incident during which he was beaten and critically injured by neighbors of the woman he allegedly robbed.
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