Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVirginia Woolf
IN THE NEWS

Virginia Woolf

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Today is the 131st anniversary of Virginia Woolf's birth. Happy birthday, Virginia Woolf! Woolf was a groundbreaking writer, an incisive critic and a catalyst for the modernist movement in British letters. Among her most significant works are the novels "Mrs. Dalloway" (1925), "To the Lighthouse" (1927), "Orlando" (1928), "The Waves" (1931) and the nonfiction treatise on women's writing, "A Room of One's Own" (1929). Adeline Virginia Stephen was born to a literary family in London in 1882.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," Steppenwolf Theatre Company's 50 th anniversary restaging of Edward Albee's drama, was named best revival of a play at the 67th Tony Awards, presented Sunday night at Radio City Music Hall. Directed by Tony nominee Pam MacKinnon (“Clybourne Park”), the production starred Tracy Letts, Amy Morton, Carrie Coon and Madison Dirks caught in a night of barbs and booze. The show began previews at the Booth Theatre Sept. 27, 2012, and played 159 performances before wrapping its run March 3. PHOTOS: Tony top nominees and winners The other nominees this year in the category were "Golden Boy," "The Trip to Bountiful" and "Orphans.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By David Ng
Every award season seems to bring at least one campaign scandal, and Broadway is no different from Hollywood in this respect. Producers behind the recent critically acclaimed revival of Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" have received a warning from Tony organizers for sending out campaign material that didn't receive proper approval. But Tony organizers said last week that they won't take further action to penalize the show. News of the infraction was first reported earlier this month by New York Post theater columnist Michael Riedel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By David Ng
The Tonys live... 8:22 p.m.: "Kinky Boots" was named best new musical, bringing its awards haul to six, the most of any production at the 67 th annual Tony Awards. The musical, based on the 2005 British movie about a drag queen who saves a shoe factory, beat out the London import "Matilda," which won four prizes. Winning for musical revival was "Pippin," which originated at the American Repertory Theatre in Massachusetts. "Pippin" took four Tonys. The Steppenwolf's revival of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"
BOOKS
March 16, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
Everybody's happy. Paramount and Miramax are happy to have an intelligent movie up for nine academy awards. David Hare, who wrote the screenplay, is happy to have worked on a project in which so little had to be changed in the sometimes rocky journey from page to screen. Stephen Daldry, the director, is, well, happy. And Michael Cunningham, the author of the book of the same name upon which "The Hours" is based, is happy because he fell in love with Virginia Woolf's language in her novel "Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," Steppenwolf Theatre Company's 50 th anniversary restaging of Edward Albee's drama, was named best revival of a play at the 67th Tony Awards, presented Sunday night at Radio City Music Hall. Directed by Tony nominee Pam MacKinnon (“Clybourne Park”), the production starred Tracy Letts, Amy Morton, Carrie Coon and Madison Dirks caught in a night of barbs and booze. The show began previews at the Booth Theatre Sept. 27, 2012, and played 159 performances before wrapping its run March 3. PHOTOS: Tony top nominees and winners The other nominees this year in the category were "Golden Boy," "The Trip to Bountiful" and "Orphans.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A party can be very theatrical. Stars and supporting players come and go. Intense impressions of each other are based on a few sketchy fragments of information. People think one thing and say another. The overall effect can be exhilarating or excruciating. Finally, all of the effort creates nothing more permanent than memories. It's like many a play. Virginia Woolf took her readers behind the scenes, so to speak, into the brains of several partygoers at Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1991 | RAY LOYND
For only the second time in its history, "Masterpiece Theatre" is airing a one-woman production, British actress Eileen Atkins playing Virginia Woolf in an adaptation of Woolf's burnished call for women's creative freedom, "A Room of One's Own" (Sunday on KCET Channel 28 at 9 p.m.). Woolf raised eyebrows in 1928 when she told young female students at Cambridge University's Girton College that "a woman must have money and a room of one's own if she is to write fiction."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2002 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A towering and tormented figure, Virginia Woolf experienced life through the distorted prism of her own troubled mind. As her writings reveal, Woolf was subject to manic mood swings, periods of despair countered by intense raptures--her most fertile artistic periods--that led her to pour forth her swirling emotions into precise, pointed prose. Her life ended in suicide, but Woolf's enduring legacy of proto-feminist essays and stream-of-consciousness fiction paved the way to the modern novel.
TRAVEL
October 8, 1989 | WILLIAM G. MILLER, Miller is a free-lance writer living on England's Isle of Wight.
The ghost of Virginia Woolf hangs lightly over Bloomsbury. A blue plaque on the wall of a building in which she once lived is all that remains to tell of her life here. There are no homes to visit, no museums and no shrines either to her or to other members of the literary "group" that once stirred and shocked English sensibilities. What remains are the squares of Bloomsbury, each a green retreat from the pressures of the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By David Ng
Every award season seems to bring at least one campaign scandal, and Broadway is no different from Hollywood in this respect. Producers behind the recent critically acclaimed revival of Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" have received a warning from Tony organizers for sending out campaign material that didn't receive proper approval. But Tony organizers said last week that they won't take further action to penalize the show. News of the infraction was first reported earlier this month by New York Post theater columnist Michael Riedel.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Unfortunately your browser does not support IFrames. Today, we are reminded of these universal truths: “Life is very long” (T.S. Eliot). “Family holds us up….Family knocks us down.” And Meryl Streep is poised for a 2013 Oscar. The trailer for “August: Osage County,” based on Tracy Letts' 2008 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, is out Friday. The film, directed by John Wells, centers on a dysfunctional Oklahoma family whose drug-addicted matriarch, Streep, is dying of mouth cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Even Pulitzer Prize-winning playwrights are prone to self-doubt. Edward Albee, the Tony Award-winning writer of 1962's “Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,” was supposed to see his newest work, “Laying an Egg,” debut off-Broadway as the centerpiece of the Signature Theater's 2013-2014 season. However, the play has been postponed -- for the second time -- presumably because Albee doesn't feel the work is ready for production, the New York Times reported. The play is about a middle-aged woman on a quest to become pregnant, a journey that's further complicated by her domineering mother and the parameters of her late father's will.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Ten noteworthy plot turns in the 2013 Tony nominations 1. “Kinky Boots” (with 13 nominations) edging “Matilda” (with 12 nominations) for most nominated show. A reminder that Harvey Fierstein, the “Kinky” book writer, is the Harvey Weinstein of the Tonys. 2. “Bring It On: The Musical” getting a nomination for best musical over “Hands on a Hardbody.” The lesson: Gymnastic cheerleading more crowd-pleasing than a paralytic auto-dealership marathon. FULL COVERAGE: Tonys 2013 3. Bette Midler getting frozen out of the best actress category.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- Can Tom Hanks add a Tony Award to his crowded mantle? That's one of many questions that emerged after the Tony committee announced its acting nominations Tuesday morning, with Hanks' name on the shortlist for best actor in a play for his portrayal of late columnist Mike McAlary in Nora Ephron's “Lucky Guy.” Hanks already has two Oscars and five Emmys over his 30-year career as an actor and producer, but he has never won a...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Today is the 131st anniversary of Virginia Woolf's birth. Happy birthday, Virginia Woolf! Woolf was a groundbreaking writer, an incisive critic and a catalyst for the modernist movement in British letters. Among her most significant works are the novels "Mrs. Dalloway" (1925), "To the Lighthouse" (1927), "Orlando" (1928), "The Waves" (1931) and the nonfiction treatise on women's writing, "A Room of One's Own" (1929). Adeline Virginia Stephen was born to a literary family in London in 1882.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1992 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any production of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" usually clocks in at three hours even when the pace is brisk and the mordant humor is allowed to zip along. But if the pulsating wisecracks of Edward Albee's corrosive marital epic are turned into mere recriminations and buried beneath a portentous tone, as they are in the current revival by the Vanguard Theatre Ensemble, those three hours can seem like an eternity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
The announcement last week was unexpected but specific: "Jerome Robbins' Broadway" will not--repeat, not --come to the Century City Shubert next April. Look for it now in May. May, 1991. After it goes to Japan. Whaaaaaaat? . . . Never mind that the show (still going strong on Broadway) was scheduled and advertised for April. Never mind that it was offered to (and paid for by) Ahmanson subscribers as part of their 1989-90 season. Never mind that $2.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Will Self joined us from the office of his London publisher, Bloomsbury, to talk about his challenging new novel "Umbrella. " It was shortlisted for the 2012 Man Booker Prize. Just released in the U.S. by Grove/Atlantic, "Umbrella" is told in stream-of-consciousness form, following in the footsteps of high modernists such as Virginia Woolf and James Joyce. While some have called it a masterpiece , its style has put off some readers, who find it too difficult. Does that mean that writing in styles made famous by Joyce and Woolf is somehow still avant-garde, nearly a century later?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Tracy Letts has his hands full these days writing plays and preparing for the release of the movie version of his Pulitzer-Prize-winning drama, "August: Osage County. " But he's added another formidable task to his agenda: elucidating Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" for a 21st century audience. Playwrights often shed indirect light on their predecessors. Harold Pinter's taut language, for example, helped us to better appreciate Samuel Beckett's minimalist aesthetics.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|