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Viroxan Drug

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five AIDS victims have sued a North Hollywood hospital for allegedly taking part in an "unethical experiment" conducted on them by a former Orange County radiologist seeking human test data to help him market a phony AIDS cure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing the first AIDS medical fraud case to come to trial in the United States, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury ordered North Hollywood Medical Center on Friday to pay $1.8 million in punitive damages for allowing an "unethical medical experiment" on five patients. The decision brought total damages to $2.
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NEWS
December 11, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A North Hollywood physician who injected AIDS patients with a homemade chemical of no proven value has had his medical license revoked, the first such action against a California doctor accused of AIDS quackery. Administrative Law Judge M.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing the first AIDS medical fraud case to come to trial in the United States, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury ordered North Hollywood Medical Center on Friday to pay $1.8 million in punitive damages for allowing an "unethical medical experiment" on five patients. The decision brought total damages to $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1994 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen MacEachron lay on her bed, blinking back tears as she made another entry in her videotaped diary. With her camcorder whirring, she talked quietly about trying a new drug, Viroxan, that she hoped would stop the lymph cancer that was slowly killing her. "This experimental treatment is a godsend," said MacEachron, a former legal secretary and aspiring writer in Santa Monica. "If this doesn't get any better--this is just a nightmare, you know?" But things quickly went wrong with Viroxan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first such case in California, state authorities have moved to revoke the medical licenses of two Southern California doctors who they say treated hundreds of AIDS sufferers with an ineffective remedy produced in a crude laboratory in one physician's kitchen. Four patients died after receiving the treatment, including a Los Angeles floral designer who lay immobile in his bathtub for several days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Medical Center of North Hollywood knew a doctor was treating patients in its AIDS ward with useless Vitamin C injections but did nothing to stop him, according to new papers filed in a lawsuit by nine AIDS sufferers. The patients sued the hospital, the doctor and several others last year, saying they participated in an "unethical experiment" on the patients using an illegal AIDS potion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County radiologist who developed an AIDS drug in his kitchen sink in partnership with a North Hollywood doctor was sentenced Wednesday to three years informal probation and fined $12,000 for his part in advertising and selling the drug. Stephen Herman, 55, of Villa Park pleaded guilty in Central Municipal Court in Santa Ana to 10 misdemeanor counts in connection with the sale of the drug, called Viroxan.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first such case in California, state authorities have moved to revoke the medical licenses of two Southern California doctors who they say treated hundreds of AIDS sufferers with an ineffective medicine produced in a crude laboratory in one physician's kitchen. Four patients died after receiving the treatment, including a Los Angeles floral designer who lay immobile in his bathtub for days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing the first AIDS medical fraud case to come to trial in the United States, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury ordered North Hollywood Medical Center on Friday to pay $1.8 million in punitive damages for allowing an "unethical medical experiment" on five patients. The decision brought total damages to $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1994 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen MacEachron lay on her bed, blinking back tears as she made another entry in her videotaped diary. With her camcorder whirring, she talked quietly about trying a new drug, Viroxan, that she hoped would stop the lymph cancer that was slowly killing her. "This experimental treatment is a godsend," said MacEachron, a former legal secretary and aspiring writer in Santa Monica. "If this doesn't get any better--this is just a nightmare, you know?" But things quickly went wrong with Viroxan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS
The Medical Center of North Hollywood knew a doctor was treating patients on its AIDS ward with "useless" Vitamin C injections but did nothing to stop him, according to new papers filed in a lawsuit by nine AIDS sufferers. The patients sued the hospital, the doctor and several others last year, saying they participated in an "unethical experiment" on the patients, using an illegal AIDS potion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Medical Center of North Hollywood knew a doctor was treating patients in its AIDS ward with useless Vitamin C injections but did nothing to stop him, according to new papers filed in a lawsuit by nine AIDS sufferers. The patients sued the hospital, the doctor and several others last year, saying they participated in an "unethical experiment" on the patients using an illegal AIDS potion.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time a friend finally found him, Mark Snider had lain helpless in his bathtub for three days. Naked and in shock, he was in the fetal position, his body racked by blood poisoning, pneumonia and severe staph infection. Snider, a Beverly Hills floral designer with AIDS, recently had begun taking an underground AIDS drug called Viroxan. Four days after he was discovered in the tub, he was dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former North Hollywood doctor--the first in California to have his medical license revoked for AIDS quackery--has filed for bankruptcy, a move that halts a series of lawsuits against him by ex-patients. State medical authorities canceled Valentine G. Birds' license last year for helping AIDS patients inject themselves with an illegal AIDS drug called Viroxan, developed by a former Orange County doctor in his pool house kitchen. Raymond L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Villa Park radiologist who developed a homemade AIDS drug was sentenced Wednesday to three years of informal probation and fined $12,000 for his part in advertising and selling the drug. Stephen Herman, 55, pleaded guilty in Central Municipal Court to 10 misdemeanor counts in connection with the sale of the drug called Viroxan.
NEWS
July 30, 1994 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing the first AIDS medical fraud case to come to trial in the United States, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury ordered North Hollywood Medical Center on Friday to pay $1.8 million in punitive damages for allowing an "unethical medical experiment" on five patients. The decision brought total damages to $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Villa Park radiologist who developed a homemade AIDS drug was sentenced Wednesday to three years of informal probation and fined $12,000 for his part in advertising and selling the drug. Stephen Herman, 55, pleaded guilty in Central Municipal Court to 10 misdemeanor counts in connection with the sale of the drug called Viroxan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Villa Park radiologist who developed a homemade AIDS drug was sentenced Wednesday to three years' informal probation and fined $12,000 for his part in advertising and selling the product. Stephen Herman, 55, pleaded guilty in Central Municipal Court to 10 misdemeanor counts in connection with the sale of the drug called Viroxan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County radiologist who developed an AIDS drug in his kitchen sink in partnership with a North Hollywood doctor was sentenced Wednesday to three years informal probation and fined $12,000 for his part in advertising and selling the drug. Stephen Herman, 55, of Villa Park pleaded guilty in Central Municipal Court in Santa Ana to 10 misdemeanor counts in connection with the sale of the drug, called Viroxan.
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