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Virtual Private Networks

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BUSINESS
November 9, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Security has always been paramount to Rockwell Semiconductor Systems, which swaps new designs and other sensitive information between its headquarters in Newport Beach and an engineer in Iceland, a marketing team in the south of France and manufacturing facilities in South Korea. The Internet couldn't be trusted to keep such information secure, so for years Rockwell executives have paid millions of dollars annually for access to data lines that only they could use.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
After first blocking Twitter, Turkey has now also blocked access to YouTube, according to numerous reports.  The action comes after a recording allegedly containing audio from a meeting among many top Turkish officials was leaked onto the Google-owned service. In the recording, the officials can allegedly be heard discussing possible military actions in Syria. The blocking of YouTube comes a week after Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan used a court order to ban Twitter in the country.   VIDEO: Unboxing the HTC One (M8)
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BUSINESS
November 7, 1998
PUBLIC PATH: Firms such as Rockwell Semiconductor--where Ashwin Rangan, above, works--are switching to the Internet for "virtual private networks." COMING TUESDAY WALL STREET, CALIFORNIA BREAKFAST BATTLES: Stock Exchange's James Peltz and Michael Hiltzik get up pretty early in the morning to look at Starbucks and Kellogg.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - For years, China's net censors turned a blind eye to a major loophole. Anyone who wanted access to blocked overseas websites like Twitter, Facebook, and more recently, the New York Times, only needed to download foreign software called a virtual private network (VPN) to circumvent the Great Firewall. But in recent weeks, even these tools have begun to falter, frustrating tech-savvy Chinese and foreign businesspeople who now struggle to access Internet sites as innocuous as gmail.com and imdb.com.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
After first blocking Twitter, Turkey has now also blocked access to YouTube, according to numerous reports.  The action comes after a recording allegedly containing audio from a meeting among many top Turkish officials was leaked onto the Google-owned service. In the recording, the officials can allegedly be heard discussing possible military actions in Syria. The blocking of YouTube comes a week after Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan used a court order to ban Twitter in the country.   VIDEO: Unboxing the HTC One (M8)
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - For years, China's net censors turned a blind eye to a major loophole. Anyone who wanted access to blocked overseas websites like Twitter, Facebook, and more recently, the New York Times, only needed to download foreign software called a virtual private network (VPN) to circumvent the Great Firewall. But in recent weeks, even these tools have begun to falter, frustrating tech-savvy Chinese and foreign businesspeople who now struggle to access Internet sites as innocuous as gmail.com and imdb.com.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2012 | By Laura Hautala, Los Angeles Times
Not happy with NBC's coverage of the Olympics? There's an online alternative that's commercial free, more international in scope and does not feature Ryan Seacrest. It's at the BBC website, where the British broadcaster streams the Games live and offers clips in high-quality video just a tantalizing click away. The catch? That click will not work outside Britain. Or at least it's not supposed to. Some viewers have found a way around the BBC restriction by using a common online business tool — a virtual private network that can cost as little as $10 a month.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1998
A Colorado Internet services company said Thursday that it has consolidated 30 local and regional affiliates nationwide, including two Orange County operations that it melded into one and now calls Verio Southern California. Verio Inc. said the consolidations are aimed at improving the company's presence in each of the 33 U.S. markets it serves.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN
Telecom in general continues to attract hoards of investment dollars. A hot new stock offering that will begin trading today: Net2000 Communications (ticker symbol: NTKK), a broadband services provider. It sold 10 million shares at $20 a share late Monday.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2002 | Ron Harris, Associated Press
Palm Inc. is expected to introduce two new hand-held computer models today, each aimed at getting into the hands of tech-savvy mobile professionals and early technology adopters. Palm's new Tungsten T, with a suggested retail price of $499, is the company's first hand-held with built-in Bluetooth technology. That allows it to communicate wirelessly with a host of Bluetooth-enabled devices such as printers and cell phones and other equivalent Palm devices.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2012 | By Laura Hautala, Los Angeles Times
Not happy with NBC's coverage of the Olympics? There's an online alternative that's commercial free, more international in scope and does not feature Ryan Seacrest. It's at the BBC website, where the British broadcaster streams the Games live and offers clips in high-quality video just a tantalizing click away. The catch? That click will not work outside Britain. Or at least it's not supposed to. Some viewers have found a way around the BBC restriction by using a common online business tool — a virtual private network that can cost as little as $10 a month.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Security has always been paramount to Rockwell Semiconductor Systems, which swaps new designs and other sensitive information between its headquarters in Newport Beach and an engineer in Iceland, a marketing team in the south of France and manufacturing facilities in South Korea. The Internet couldn't be trusted to keep such information secure, so for years Rockwell executives have paid millions of dollars annually for access to data lines that only they could use.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1998
PUBLIC PATH: Firms such as Rockwell Semiconductor--where Ashwin Rangan, above, works--are switching to the Internet for "virtual private networks." COMING TUESDAY WALL STREET, CALIFORNIA BREAKFAST BATTLES: Stock Exchange's James Peltz and Michael Hiltzik get up pretty early in the morning to look at Starbucks and Kellogg.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
In case there were any doubts about Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan's slide into authoritarianism, they disappeared in one fell tweet Thursday when the government blocked access to the Twitter social media site. Though in the end, the move may have backfired. The editorial page noted shortly after Erdogan's Justice and Development Party pushed through a change in Turkish law last month granting Erdogan's government the power to block Internet sites that the move threatened democratic free expression and corruption probes.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Sun Microsystems Inc. is set to release today its first software for managing the assignments of multiple computer servers, an important initial step in the sagging hardware firm's effort to change directions. The software is the first fruit of a year-old strategy to establish a family of programs and services that Sun calls N1. Santa Clara, Calif.
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