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Virtual World

BUSINESS
February 25, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
DreamWorks Animation had good news and a bigger dose of bad news in its fourth quarter, as strong DVD sales for "How to Train Your Dragon" were reported alongside a disappointing DVD release for "Shrek Forever After" and a weak box-office run for "Megamind. " The Glendale animation studio also took write-downs on its unsuccessful "Kung Fu Panda" virtual world and the national tour of its live stage show "Shrek the Musical. " DreamWorks released three movies in 2010, the most it has put out in a single year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2006
It was nice of Christopher Knight to include me (and the rest of the public) along with himself as a "stakeholder" in the Getty ["Yes, You Can Be Too Rich," June 5], but he failed to make a case for having an "art expert" run a $6-billion enterprise. From my own observation, art experts belong to one of the most fractious groups in our society. Which one, then, would Mr. Knight approve? Possibly one that would carry out his own, oft-expressed goal for the Getty -- spend those billions buying masterpieces to turn the Getty into another Met-like mausoleum.
BOOKS
August 4, 1991 | Robert Wright, Wright is a senior editor at the New Republic and the author of "Three Scientists and Their Gods: Looking for Meaning in an Age of Information" (HarperCollins)
Toward the end of "Virtual Reality," author Howard Rheingold peers into the world of tomorrow and offers the following report: "(T)here is no reason to believe you won't be able to map your genital effectors to your manual sensors and have direct genital contact by shaking hands." Then he asks: "What will happen to social touching when nobody knows where anybody else's erogenous zones are located?" I must admit that this question had never occurred to me.
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
I won't lie -- I usually find it cute when my sons and my husband geek out over Superman or Batman. But there are times when the antics wear thin. Like when my 3-year-old refuses to wear his glasses because "Wolverine doesn't wear glasses. " Or when he chases our cat around the house, fists flying, screaming, "BATMAN!" Now the journal PLoS One has published a study to inspire hope in mothers like me: Scientists said Wednesday that experiencing a Superman-like power of flight, in a virtual reality simulation, made people more helpful.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
In the past, Bill Moyers has talked with ideological gurus, idiosyncratic artists and iconoclastic scientists. To toast his new season of "A World of Ideas" (at 7:35 tonight on Channel 28), Moyers has found a new type to mix it up with. Meet Robert Lucky, techie with a human face. Lucky, in case you don't know, is executive director of the innovative Bell Labs' communications sciences research division.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By David Pagel
The 12 digitally printed photographs in Stephanie Washburn's solo debut at Mark Moore Gallery are mysterious messes that make you look closely. They also invite you to ponder big questions about the nature of reality and art's place in it. Such heavy-duty philosophizing is rarely handled with Washburn's light touch, which leaves plenty of room for viewers who like DIY discoveries. In each of her pictures, the visible world seems to have dissolved into a faded version of itself, like an all-but-lost memory or a digital transmission on the fritz.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2012 | By Chris O'Brien
If you're like me and have a child who lives and breathes Minecraft, then you'll want to take note of the following important scheduling note:  A documentary called "Minecraft: The Story of Mojang," which tells the story of the game and its creator, Markus "Notch" Persson, will stream Saturday at 5 p.m. Pacific time on Xbox Live .  For those not familiar with Minecraft, in short, it's a virtual world created and distributed by Persson's...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By Janice P. Nimura, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Reality Is Broken Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World Jane McGonigal Penguin Press: 388 pp., $26.95 As a nongamer, avowed Luddite and mother of a 7-year-old who is mesmerically attracted to anything with a screen, I was skeptical about the message in "Reality Is Broken. " But Jane McGonigal is worth hearing out ? her point in this provocative manifesto is that the energy and devotion that gamers pour into video games is a powerful force and that we are fools if we fail to harness it. Instead of dismissing games as frivolous entertainment or trying to unplug our children, we should take a close look at what games provide and figure out how to make reality as exciting and rewarding ?
OPINION
May 18, 2005
At least one thing is clear to me after reading "Geek Fun Isn't Frivolous" (Opinion, May 15), and that is that the editors of The Times have given up on dealing with reality in the Opinion section and are rabidly pushing the gobbledy-geek mentality onto a once thought-provoking and exciting menu concerning problems and philosophical differences in our extremely complex world involved with genocide, suicide bombers, starvation, gang warfare, ethnic wars...
NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | James Hohmann, Times Staff Writer
A man with an oversized top hat sat in the front row of a House subcommittee hearing Tuesday, munching on popcorn. Next to him was a woman wearing wings that let her fly out of her seat. And she was sitting by a large bumblebee. It wasn't an April Fool's Day stunt but the first time a congressional hearing was simulcast into the popular online virtual world called Second Life.
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