Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVision
IN THE NEWS

Vision

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010
'Vision' No MPAA rating: In German with English subtitles Running time: 1 hour, 46 minutes Playing: Laemmle's Royal Theatre, West Los Angeles; Laemmle's Playhouse 7, Pasadena; and Laemmle's Town Center 5, Encino
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Patrick McDonnell and Tom Kington
One helped revolutionize the church, becoming an enduring icon among progressive Roman Catholics who view religion as a vehicle for justice and peace. The other figured in a societal revolution outside the church, earning the adulation of conservatives by battling communism and contributing to the downfall of the Soviet Union. On Sunday, Pope Francis will canonize two pontiffs - John XXIII and John Paul II - in a ceremony here, marking the first time that two popes were made saints at the same time.
Advertisement
OPINION
October 23, 2012
Re "Nixon opponent was a liberal titan," Obituary, Oct. 22 The passing of George McGovern serves as a reminder that there once was decency in national politics and that being called a liberal was not an insult. Suffering a staggering 49-state loss in the 1972 presidential election, McGovern conceded defeat with grace and characteristic good humor. Within two years both members of the opposition Republican ticket that defeated McGovern had resigned in disgrace. McGovern was one of the first senators to call for U.S. withdrawal fromVietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey
Whether or not you embrace director Darren Aronofsky's fierce biblical vision in "Noah," it's worth seeing the film for the remarkably moving performance by Russell Crowe in the title role. The actor seems to do his best work in period pieces, the more centuries away from the present the better. Crowe's very good Roman soldier in "Gladiator" won him an Oscar in 2001, and his swashbuckling ship captain in "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World" greatly buoyed that film. It's not that Crowe can't thrive in more contemporary eras - his other Oscar nominations were for portraying Nobel-winning mathematician John Nash in "A Beautiful Mind" and a big-tobacco whistle blower in Michael Mann's "The Insider.
OPINION
April 8, 2014
Re "Partying in Grand Park," Editorial, April 4 Downtown L.A.'s Grand Park has been a big success. The mayor is inaugurated there, and the public enjoys free July 4th and New Year's Eve celebrations, ballet, yoga, dancing and book fairs. The community potential is endless. Unfortunately, not satisfied with creating a community treasure, our city leaders decided to kitsch it up with a Budweiser-sponsored Labor Day weekend concert festival that will charge admission, forgetting about Mr. and Mrs. Average Angeleno.
OPINION
September 1, 2012
Re "The critics shrugged," Opinion, Aug. 26 Ayn Rand's epic tome, "Atlas Shrugged," is a relentless 1,100-some pages of excruciating reading, a fitting punishment for any libertarian. I've never come across one of them who has actually read the darn thing. They all say they've read it and even sport the bumper stickers with the opening line, "Who is John Galt?," but none of them has been so masochistic as to have actually read it. This actualizes the famous review by Dorothy Parker, who said: "This is not a novel to be tossed aside lightly.
OPINION
July 1, 2012 | By Drew Westen
In 1933, four years after a calamitous market crash, Americans were losing hope. But then, on a cold day in March,Franklin D. Rooseveltdelivered his first inaugural address. The new president pulled no punches, laying blame for the country's financial woes squarely on Wall Street speculators - and, by implication, on their benefactors in Washington. "They have no vision," he said, citing a passage from the Bible, "and when there is no vision, the people perish. " Roosevelt, by contrast, clearly articulated a vision that reawakened the hope of a beleaguered nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012
'Bonsai People: The Vision of Muhammad Yunus' No MPAA rating Running time: 1 hour, 19 minutes Playing: At Laemmle's NoHo7, North Hollywood
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Jon Healey
Four years ago, GOP vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin -- then a relatively obscure governor of a remote state -- made a barn-burning speech at the Republican National Convention that vastly exceeded the punditry's (admittedly low) expectations. Although things went downhill from there for Palin, it was a clutch performance that helped establish the then-governor of Alaska as a national figure. The expectations will be quite a bit higher for Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), the GOP's current nominee for vice president, when he steps up to the microphone Wednesday night.
SCIENCE
June 22, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Does depth perception develop in humans as a result of nature or nurture? It's a question scientists have wondered about. And a new study comes to a surprising conclusion: Babies acquire binocular vision as a result of viewing the world around them, not merely thanks to genetic programming. "My guess was that it was going to be something in between nature and nurture," said study leader Ilona Kovacs, a psychologist at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics in Hungary.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
AUSTIN, Texas -- President Obama said Thursday that the country was still caught up in the kind of debates that marked the civil rights movement as he called on Americans to set aside cynicism and push for the ideals reflected in the Civil Rights Act. As he offered a tribute to President Johnson at a 50th anniversary celebration of the law, Obama recalled the political gridlock and ideological division he faced -- and overcame. “If some of this sounds familiar, it's because today we've become locked in the same great debate, about equality and opportunity, and the role of government in ensuring each,” Obama said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
It's rather refreshing that the next California Assembly Speaker spent her early years in a house with no indoor plumbing. Her family carried in water from a spring for drinking, cooking and washing. For a bathroom, they trekked to an outhouse. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins' father was a coal and lead miner; her mother a seamstress. The parents and their four kids crammed themselves into a little four-room house in rural southern Virginia. So when the Democrat, a San Diego transplant, talks about poor people and their housing needs, she isn't just whistling Dixie.
OPINION
April 8, 2014
Re "Partying in Grand Park," Editorial, April 4 Downtown L.A.'s Grand Park has been a big success. The mayor is inaugurated there, and the public enjoys free July 4th and New Year's Eve celebrations, ballet, yoga, dancing and book fairs. The community potential is endless. Unfortunately, not satisfied with creating a community treasure, our city leaders decided to kitsch it up with a Budweiser-sponsored Labor Day weekend concert festival that will charge admission, forgetting about Mr. and Mrs. Average Angeleno.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2014 | By Chris Barton
The Bad Plus has taken on many different guises over its career, tapping the songs of Aphex Twin, Ornette Coleman and Black Sabbath along with its own to craft a sound rooted in jazz but most consistent with a genre called the Bad Plus. Now, for the ninth studio recording, the trio of pianist Ethan Iverson, bassist Reid Anderson and drummer Dave King is taking on an orchestra. A piano trio tackling Stravinsky's knotty masterpiece "The Rite of Spring" may sound audacious. But the trio has been here before, delivering a stout take on the composer's "Variation d'Apollon" on the 2009 album "For All I Care.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
The film crew walked out on the old railroad trestle high above Georgia's Altamaha River, then placed a metal-frame bed on the tracks for actor William Hurt. The plan called for Hurt to lie on the bed in a dream sequence for the film "Midnight Rider," in which he plays rock singer Gregg Allman. Two trains had already crossed the bridge that day, and the crew was told no more were scheduled, hairstylist Joyce Gilliard recalled. Then a train came barreling toward them. "We all ran for our lives," Gilliard said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | Michael Finnegan and Seema Mehta
The two leading candidates to challenge Gov. Jerry Brown's reelection bid put their clashing brands of conservatism on display Saturday at a state Republican convention where party loyalists conceded their election prospects were bleak this year in California. At a painfully low point for the state party, Republican gubernatorial rivals Neel Kashkari and Tim Donnelly each tried to convince hundreds of wary activists that he could oust the popular Democratic incumbent. Kashkari, a former Goldman Sachs investment banker preferred by the party establishment, stressed jobs, education and his heritage as the son of Indian immigrants.
SPORTS
February 21, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
The Lakers (26-29) inched closer to .500 with a 113-99 win over the Boston Celtics on Wednesday night.  That's quite a turnaround after the Lakers were beaten soundly, 116-95, in Boston on Feb. 7. "It was definitely on my mind," Kobe Bryant said of the recent defeat. "They beat us pretty good up there. We certainly wanted to return the favor. " Bryant is expected to speak at the memorial service for Jerry Buss on Thursday. The Lakers owner died on Monday after a battle with an undisclosed form of cancer.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Getting enough vitamin D may help prevent women from losing their vision in old age. That's the quick and easy conclusion from a new study, just perhaps not one that will require you to change your diet. In a study of 1,313 women ages 50 to 79, researchers from the University of Buffalo in New York found that women with adequate levels of vitamin D were at 48% decreased odds for developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD) compared with women with insufficient levels of the vitamin.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - With his standing among the conservative base still hobbled by his support for immigration reform, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has settled on a new course, staking his claim as a leader of the Republican Party's wonk wing. The latest example came in a speech Monday on how to boost America's economic growth, in which Rubio argued that Washington needs new thinking to meet the challenges of a new economic age. "As much as we innovate now, we could be doing even more," Rubio said at a forum hosted by the Jack Kemp Foundation at Google's Washington headquarters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Joe McGinniss, the adventurous and news-making author and reporter who skewered the marketing of Richard Nixon in "The Selling of the President 1968" and tracked his personal journey from sympathizer to scourge of convicted killer Jeffrey MacDonald in the blockbuster "Fatal Vision," died Monday at a hospital in Worcester, Mass. He was 71. McGinniss died from complications of prostate cancer, according to his attorney and longtime friend Dennis Holahan. Few journalists of his time so intrepidly pursued a story, burned so many bridges or more memorably placed themselves in the narrative, whether insisting on the guilt of MacDonald after seemingly befriending him or moving next door to Sarah Palin's house for a most unauthorized biography of the former Alaska governor and Republican vice presidential candidate.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|