Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVision Interfaith Satellite Network
IN THE NEWS

Vision Interfaith Satellite Network

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
The National Baptist Convention U.S.A. Inc. plans to launch a cable TV news magazine on black life and achievements, the denomination's president, the Rev. T. J. Jemison, announced. It will deal with "education, politics, civics--not just religion--all the problems of the world," said Jemison, who was in Nashville for the denomination's annual meeting and dedication of its new $10-million Baptist World Center. The denomination is the country's third largest Protestant body--7.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
The National Baptist Convention U.S.A. Inc. plans to launch a cable TV news magazine on black life and achievements, the denomination's president, the Rev. T. J. Jemison, announced. It will deal with "education, politics, civics--not just religion--all the problems of the world," said Jemison, who was in Nashville for the denomination's annual meeting and dedication of its new $10-million Baptist World Center. The denomination is the country's third largest Protestant body--7.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1988 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, Associated Press
America's mainline faiths, mostly missing from television's sweeping purview in recent years, are launching a new, unprecedented ecumenical network on the nation's cable TV systems. Plans for the network were confirmed in interviews this week. A partial start-up is expected in midsummer, expanding to 18 to 20 hours daily in the fall. "A fresh, new wind is coming across the country's television screens," said the Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
An interfaith television network, which started offering cable companies an alternative to evangelical-fundamentalist programming last September, expanded to a fuller schedule this week amid other signs of growth. VISN, an acronym for Vision Interfaith Satellite Network, became available for the first time this week in the Greater Los Angeles area--through cable franchises in the eastern San Fernando Valley and southern Orange County. It also is seen in Oxnard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
An interfaith television network, which started offering cable companies an alternative to evangelical-fundamentalist programming last September, expanded to a fuller schedule this week amid other signs of growth. VISN, an acronym for Vision Interfaith Satellite Network, became available for the first time this week in the Greater Los Angeles area--through cable franchises in the eastern San Fernando Valley and southern Orange County. It also is seen in Oxnard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
In a move that affects 100,000 cable television subscribers and comes at a critical juncture for two influential religious broadcast services, a south Orange County cable operator will add mainline religious programming at the expense of time allotted to the conservative, evangelical Trinity Broadcasting Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1992 | N.F. MENDOZA
Assessing this week's Democratic National Convention and Ross Perot's withdrawal from the presidential race will occupy many of the network public-affairs shows this weekend. Democratic candidate Bill Clinton will field questions from viewers on the Vision Interfaith Satellite Network at noon Sunday. Perot will guest on "To the Contrary" at 8:30 a.m. Sunday (58).
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | Associated Press
The first Roman Catholic Mass from the Soviet Union to be telecast in the United States will be carried Christmas Eve by the Vision Interfaith Satellite Network. Jeff Weber, program vice president for the cable system, said the service from Vilnius Cathedral in Lithuania would be presented at 9 p.m. EST on Sunday, and repeated Christmas Day at 5 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1992 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, ASSOCIATED PREES
A survey finds most Americans feel a presidential candidate's approach to the economy is more important than his religious views, but the distinction may not be what it seems. Religious leaders regularly insist that religious teachings are directly relevant to economics, a point that was emphasized in the survey's findings. "Economics are profoundly a religious issue," said the Rev. Tex Sample, a United Methodist of St. Paul's School of Theology in Kansas City, Mo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Two interfaith cable TV networks are joining forces to offer something that they say is lacking in the world of television--realistic depictions of American life. Both use everything from dramas to documentaries to stress rudiments of everyday living, its problems, perils, opportunities, failures, strengths and potentialities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
In a move that affects 100,000 cable television subscribers and comes at a critical juncture for two influential religious broadcast services, a south Orange County cable operator will add mainline religious programming at the expense of time allotted to the conservative, evangelical Trinity Broadcasting Network.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1988 | GEORGE W. CORNELL, Associated Press
America's mainline faiths, mostly missing from television's sweeping purview in recent years, are launching a new, unprecedented ecumenical network on the nation's cable TV systems. Plans for the network were confirmed in interviews this week. A partial start-up is expected in midsummer, expanding to 18 to 20 hours daily in the fall. "A fresh, new wind is coming across the country's television screens," said the Rev.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1991 | LAUREN LIPTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A TV producer who won a Los Angeles area Emmy award last weekend notified the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Thursday that she is returning it because she discovered that the winning program hadn't aired during the eligibility period. Barbara Valentine had received the Emmy as executive producer of the best information segment for a story in "A New Beginning," a series produced by Burbank-based Santa Fe Communications and formerly broadcast on KDOC Channel 56 in Anaheim.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1992 | RICK DU BROW
I was thinking of Bishop Fulton J. Sheen the other day. He was something. In the 1950s, he was probably the best-known clergyman in the country. TV did it. He had a series called "Life Is Worth Living" that ran in prime time --competing with Milton Berle and Red Skelton--on the old Dumont network, then switched to ABC. The little lessons delivered by the Catholic bishop and his sign-off--"God love you"--were mesmerizing. This was a star.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|