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HEALTH
April 2, 2001
People with fading vision can learn to maintain their independence, at a six-week course offered by the Braille Institute. The nonprofit organization's classes teach new ways of doing household tasks, plus how to use visual aids and how to receive talking books. For times and locations, call Sharon Ziegler at (323) 663-1111, Ext. 1252, or go to http://www.brailleinstitute.org.
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NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Eryn Brown
An increase in vision problems that cannot be corrected with lenses may be related to an uptick in diabetes rates over the same period, researchers said Tuesday. The team, led by Dr. David S. Friedman of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, gathered survey and physical examination data collected from 9,471 U.S. adults over the age of 20 in 1999 to 2002 and from another set of 10,480 Americans in 2005 to 2008.  The researchers calculated that rates of prevalence of “non-refractive visual impairment” increased 21% in the overall study population, from 1.4% in 1999-2002 to 1.7% in 2005-2008.
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HEALTH
July 30, 2007 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Special to The Times
I have been diagnosed with the onset of macular degeneration. The eye doctor said there is no cure. Are there any vitamins or other nutritional supplements that might slow the process down? I'd like to keep my vision for as long as possible. Research has shown that several nutritional factors can slow the development of macular degeneration.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Jack Osbourne has revealed that he has multiple sclerosis, an incurable and unpredictable disease that attacks the central nervous system. The offspring of rocker Ozzy Osbourne and "America's Got Talent" judge Sharon Osbourne said the diagnosis came just as life was soaring with new joys. Osbourne, 26, and his fiancee recently welcomed a baby girl, Pearl. "While I was waiting for the final results, I got really, really angry," he told Hello! magazine. "Then I got really sad for about two days, and after that I realized: Being angry and upset is not going to do anything at this point, if anything it's only going to make it worse ...  'adapt and overcome' is my new motto.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | LEE SIEGEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scores of Cambodians complain they are blind or suffer blurry vision although their eyes are normal--a malady some experts blame on the horrors they witnessed in the killing fields of their native land. "These women saw things that their minds just could not accept," said psychology professor Patricia Rozee-Koker of Cal State Long Beach, who studies vision complaints of the Khmer Rouge regime's refugees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1986 | ANDREW C. REVKIN, Times Staff Writer
A Van Nuys hospital Saturday inaugurated one of the nation's first centers providing medical and psychological support for people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa, an incurable form of blindness that afflicts as many as 400,000 Americans. Staffed by blind and sighted volunteers and hospital staff, the Retinitis Pigmentosa Vision Loss Adjustment Center at Valley Hospital Medical Center will be unusual.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Lutein, a yellow pigment found in dark green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale and collard greens, can reverse some of the symptoms of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of visual disability in the United States, according to a new study. As many as 6 million Americans have at least some vision loss because of the disease, and the number is expected to double by 2025 as the baby boom generation ages.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writers
An investigation into whether Viagra and other popular impotence drugs may cause permanent eye damage is unlikely to lead to a recall, federal officials and medical experts said Friday, but could prompt new warnings. The Food and Drug Administration is looking into 38 reports of eye damage in men who took Viagra, four reports involving Cialis, and one linked to Levitra. About 30 million men worldwide have taken the drugs.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Pfizer Inc. is defending itself in court against Viagra users who claim the drug caused them to lose their vision. At least 17 cases allege that Pfizer failed to properly warn users that Viagra may cause vision loss, said U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson, who will hear the cases in St. Paul, Minn. The first case will probably be heard in about a year, said Magnuson, who met with attorneys involved in the lawsuits.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Pfizer Inc., the world's biggest drug maker, will change the label for its Viagra impotence pill to warn doctors about sudden vision loss that has occurred in some men who took the drug. The Food and Drug Administration is asking all makers of impotence drugs to include similar warnings, New York-based Pfizer said in a statement Monday. No causal relationship has been made between Viagra and the condition, a type of eye stroke called non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Pfizer said.
HEALTH
February 21, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
The premise: Annie (Jennie Garth) is a waitress, a widow and a mother with a big problem. Her 6-year-old daughter, Taylor (Dannika Northcott), is steadily losing her eyesight. By the time we meet the young girl, she can see only bright colors and vague shapes. Doctors say she will probably go blind within a year without surgery. Annie's new boyfriend, an actor named Eddie (Ethan Erickson), finds a philanthropic organization — the aptly named It's a Miracle Foundation — that will fund an operation if an eye surgeon recommends it. Taylor is examined by an eye surgeon who confirms she has "optic nerve hypoplasia.
NEWS
October 1, 2010
Avastin, the anti-cancer drug already widely used off-label by physicians to treat the wet form of age-related macular degeneration, is as effective as Lucentis, the gold standard for treatment of the disorder, researchers said Friday. The first head-to-head study of the two drugs could be a step toward Food and Drug Administration approval to market Avastin for macular degeneration, which would lead more insurance companies to reimburse patients for its use. Potentially more important, Avastin is much cheaper than Lucentis -- costing about $50 per injection compared with $2,000 per injecton for Lucentis.
HEALTH
May 24, 2010 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Flashy lasers get much of the attention in vision-correcting surgery, but they can't fix severe shortsightedness. For those wearing the thickest glasses, a newer procedure provides better eyesight with less risk of vision loss, according to a recent study. In this alternative procedure, surgeons insert a new lens inside the eye, behind the colored iris. It's like a contact lens that sits inside the eye. In a May 12 review by the nonprofit Cochrane Collaboration, which analyzes healthcare data, the authors reported that internal contacts make people in the middle-to-high range of shortsightedness happier with their vision than does Lasik.
HEALTH
July 30, 2007 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Special to The Times
I have been diagnosed with the onset of macular degeneration. The eye doctor said there is no cure. Are there any vitamins or other nutritional supplements that might slow the process down? I'd like to keep my vision for as long as possible. Research has shown that several nutritional factors can slow the development of macular degeneration.
HEALTH
May 14, 2007 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The product: Eye supplements are a hot topic of conversation in Kerry Beebe's optometry office in Brainerd, Minn., right up there with the weather and Frances McDormand trivia. "We field questions about vitamins multiple times a day," says Beebe, chairman of the Clinical Care Group for the American Optometric Assn. Patients mainly want to know if vitamins can help save them from macular degeneration, the leading cause of severe vision loss in America.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Pfizer Inc. is defending itself in court against Viagra users who claim the drug caused them to lose their vision. At least 17 cases allege that Pfizer failed to properly warn users that Viagra may cause vision loss, said U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson, who will hear the cases in St. Paul, Minn. The first case will probably be heard in about a year, said Magnuson, who met with attorneys involved in the lawsuits.
HEALTH
June 21, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
African Americans have a substantially higher risk of developing glaucoma than do whites, but researchers have now found they respond just as well to preventive therapy. A major study released two years ago showed that the regular use of prescription eyedrops by whites at risk of developing the eye disorder can reduce its incidence by nearly 50%, but results in blacks were not as clear.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Pfizer Inc., the world's biggest drug maker, will change the label for its Viagra impotence pill to warn doctors about sudden vision loss that has occurred in some men who took the drug. The Food and Drug Administration is asking all makers of impotence drugs to include similar warnings, New York-based Pfizer said in a statement Monday. No causal relationship has been made between Viagra and the condition, a type of eye stroke called non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Pfizer said.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writers
An investigation into whether Viagra and other popular impotence drugs may cause permanent eye damage is unlikely to lead to a recall, federal officials and medical experts said Friday, but could prompt new warnings. The Food and Drug Administration is looking into 38 reports of eye damage in men who took Viagra, four reports involving Cialis, and one linked to Levitra. About 30 million men worldwide have taken the drugs.
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