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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1989 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
Frank Cox, known to generations of San Diegans as "Frank the Trainman" because of a four-decade affiliation with his own model train shop, died Thursday of a heart attack. He was 82. "He was the dean of train collectors," said Tom Sefton, president of San Diego Trust & Savings Bank, who said he and Cox had been friends since 1946. "He was responsible more than anyone else by far for the introduction of trains at Christmas time . . . for the young finding trains under the tree.
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NEWS
February 3, 1985 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and ROBERT WELKOS, Times Staff Writers
Whenever Samuel Benitez, who now lives in Portland, Ore., even thinks about his old job as a Los Angeles policeman, he says he starts coughing. And the closer he gets to Los Angeles, the worse the hacking gets. Benitez, 35, claims that the cough is caused by stress from working for the Los Angeles Police Department. Complaining that the cough disabled him, he recently won a lifetime tax-free disability pension of $1,480 a month, plus $51,390 in back benefits.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's most famous "country club prison," once the domain of such celebrity felons as inside trader Ivan Boesky and Watergate figure H.R. Haldeman, is shutting down. The Lompoc Federal Prison Camp is being converted into a higher security federal prison. A prison with fences and razor wire instead of small "off-limits" signs around the property. A prison where inmates have to wear khaki uniforms instead of shorts and T-shirts. A prison where inmates can't play tennis in the afternoon.
OPINION
May 25, 2003 | Macarena Hernandez, Macarena Hernandez is a reporter for the San Antonio Express-News.
One of the last stories Jayson Blair wrote before being unmasked as a liar and plagiarist contained these words: "Juanita Anguiano points proudly to the pinstriped couches, the tennis bracelet in its red case and the Martha Stewart furniture out on the patio. She proudly points up to the ceiling fan."
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Newman Hood sits in a quaint, ornate courtroom, rocking slowly in his wooden chair, as lawyers and witnesses chart his descent from the golden existence and happy family life he once knew to the prospect of financial ruin and a life behind bars.
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | CAITLIN LIU and EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A shootout Sunday between armored car guards and gunmen, one armed with an AK-47 assault rifle, left one bystander dead and at least three people wounded after a botched robbery outside a Van Nuys Costco store teeming with shoppers, authorities said. Panic-stricken customers, many with children, dived for cover in the pandemonium. Bullets shattered car windows 100 yards away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1990
Inglewood officials have asked that their city be included on Nelson Mandela's itinerary during the South African anti-apartheid leader's tour of the United States next month. Inglewood Mayor Edward Vincent and Councilman Daniel Tabor, both members of the Los Angeles organizing committee for Mandela's visit, are attempting to arrange an address by the 71-year-old Mandela, who was freed by the government in February after spending 27 years as a political prisoner.
SPORTS
April 29, 2000 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles Chatman was an exceptional running back and safety at Costa Mesa High, but his days as a football player ended while he was on scholarship at Kent State. Now, with some guidance from his uncle, Cleveland Indian batting coach Clarence Jones, Chatman is playing baseball at Concordia and hoping he didn't wait too long to change his focus. "This is what I should have been doing all along, playing baseball," said Chatman, who rushed for 2,500 yards and 29 touchdowns at Costa Mesa in 1994.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flashing wide smiles, young baseball players from Isehara, Japan, revealed what they have discovered since arriving in their town's sister city of La Mirada last Sunday. Their American counterparts--boys 10, 11 and 12 years old--have their own bedrooms in large houses, chew sunflower seeds during games and speak openly to their parents without being spoken to first.
SPORTS
July 25, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ian Thorpe of Australia powered to his second world record in three days Tuesday in the World Championships at Fukuoka, Japan. Michael Phelps of the U.S. also smashed a world record, breaking his mark in the 200-meter butterfly with a time of 1:54.58. Thorpe's two records are his 10th and 11th in individual long-course events. He won three Olympic gold medals at Sydney, Australia, last year and already has three world titles at Fukuoka.
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