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Vista Project

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NEWS
October 4, 2005 | Hugo Martin
CONSTRUCTION has begun on a $1.5-million face-lift for Olmsted Point, the 8,400-foot-high vista along Tioga Road in Yosemite National Park. The overlook offers park visitors a bird's-eye view of Half Dome, Tenaya Lake and Mt. Conness. The project, funded by the nonprofit Yosemite Fund, will replace erosion damage to the parking lot and surrounding trails. It will add a retaining wall, educational exhibits and access for the disabled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2009 | Jean Merl
The Los Angeles Planning Commission rejected on Thursday a 1,950-unit housing project for a 61.5-acre site in San Pedro but directed its staff to continue to work with the community and developers of the proposed complex, dubbed Ponte Vista, to come up with a smaller project. Planners will have six months to try to forge a compromise between the staff recommendation of 775 to 885 units and the developer's latest proposal, for 1,395 units.
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NEWS
November 11, 1993
Councilwomen Ruth Galanter's criticism of the group Save the Ballona Wetlands for not asking her opinion and advice (Times, Oct. 24) is curious. Whatever was the epiphany that led to her miraculous conversion on the Playa Vista project? As recently as May, in her comments on the Final Environmental Impact Report, she stated: "No matter how enlightened and self-sufficient certain aspects of Playa Vista's First Phase may be, it cannot be built as proposed without inflicting major negative impacts on the community surrounding it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2006 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council decided Wednesday against requiring the builders of the massive Playa Vista housing project to write a supplemental environmental impact report. The vote came one day after a Superior Court judge threw out two lawsuits against the second phase of Playa Vista brought by the city of Santa Monica and environmental groups. It was victories on both counts for the project, which has been slowly rising for several years.
NEWS
August 19, 1993
I feel the Times has been unfair in its coverage of the Playa Vista project. Your articles have implied that there is broad community support for this development, and only two opponents. In truth, at the last public hearing, on June 23, the speakers alternated pro and con. If my math is right, that means 50% of the speakers were against or had serious concerns about this massive development. My observation was that the people opposed were mostly the residents who live in the area and who have no economic gains from development profits, temporary construction jobs, etc. These were just citizens, many of whom took time off from jobs, to tell the hearing spokesman their fears and concerns.
NEWS
December 17, 1992
The proposed Playa Vista project has created two of the more interesting bedfellows in the discourse between developers and environmentalists: Nelson Rising of Maguire Thomas Partners and Ruth Lansford of Friends of Ballona Wetlands. Lansford, in her wish (and mine) to save the wetlands will not strenuously object to Playa Vista as long as some wetlands acreage is set aside. If the massive project is built, I wonder if the birds will want to return to the wetlands within sight of a mass of buildings, roads and noise from Playa Vista, and with thousands of cars loudly passing by. One of the current beauties of the wetlands is their relative isolation, which will be obliterated by Playa Vista.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A land swap approved by the county Board of Supervisors on Tuesday paves the way for new courtrooms to be built in Vista. The question is whether the money will be there to finish the project or staff it with judges. The trade between the county and the Breeze Hill Partnership culminates 2 1/2 years of negotiations that gives the developer a 7.54-acre parcel in exchange for a smaller lot and $957,114 to expand the existing court complex in Vista.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think traffic congestion along the coast couldn't get much worse? Think again. It can and will, a new study concludes, if an anticipated building boom proceeds without new streets and programs to get drivers off the road. The study paints an alarming picture of traffic swelling more than 80% over the next 12 years in the already-crowded coastal corridor running from Santa Monica to El Segundo. But both the development firm that commissioned the study and city officials say that, for a number of reasons, that worst-case scenario is unlikely to happen.
NEWS
December 17, 1992
At a time when Los Angeles desperately needs restoring, do we have to have the Playa Vista project? Who, besides the vested interests, wants it? Many thanks to state Sen. Tom Hayden for being the first elected official to criticize this boondoggle (Times, Dec. 13). May he not be the last. HARRY GARLAND Venice
NEWS
October 20, 1991
After reading about the "2,000 pound gorilla" Playa Vista project (Times, Oct. 6), I had enough questions that I attended the Small Craft Harbor Commission hearing to see if the commissioners shared my concerns. Happily, they did not automatically agree with the pronouncement by Nelson Rising, senior partner at developer Maguire Thomas, that this is a "very, very attractive package for the county." My family and friends, to the contrary, cherish these wild expanses which provide relief amid the urban scapes of Westchester and Marina del Rey. I applaud the commissioners for their cautious deliberations on the financial and environmental benefits to the community of this proposal.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | Hugo Martin
CONSTRUCTION has begun on a $1.5-million face-lift for Olmsted Point, the 8,400-foot-high vista along Tioga Road in Yosemite National Park. The overlook offers park visitors a bird's-eye view of Half Dome, Tenaya Lake and Mt. Conness. The project, funded by the nonprofit Yosemite Fund, will replace erosion damage to the parking lot and surrounding trails. It will add a retaining wall, educational exhibits and access for the disabled.
OPINION
July 14, 2004
Re "Panel OKs Phase 2 of Playa Vista," July 9: It is puzzling how Mayor James K. Hahn and his Planning Commission appointees state that Playa Vista's Phase 2 will somehow aid with the jobs and housing imbalance. A primary reason the Eastside-to-Westside traffic grows is that there are so many Westside-dwelling wealthy folks with workers arriving each day for their jobs from the east side of the L.A. region. Will Playa Vista provide enough low-income housing to provide for these people?
OPINION
June 10, 2004
"City Is Losing a Part of Its Soul in Playa Vista" (Commentary, June 7) stated that environmentalists "are understandably grateful for a little more wetland, and grow silent when it comes to fighting on behalf of the Indians' cultural claims." In fact, the Ballona Wetlands Land Trust has sought to protect and restore the entire Ballona ecosystem to its natural, functioning form and to protect Native American burial sites since 1994. For the record, this organization does not support the developer's man-made creek across a Native American burial site.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2002 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though many are familiar with the struggle over the giant Playa Vista project, relatively few are aware that the bluffs above the development are the focus of an equally contentious real estate saga that has involved many of the same players. San Francisco-based Catellus Development Corp.
OPINION
June 7, 2002
Re "Playa Vista School Plan Is Up in the Air," May 30: The problems at the Playa Vista site are not just methane or toxics from the former Howard Hughes plant site. There are also problems with hydrogen sulfide, a toxic oilfield gas that can cause permanent brain damage. High amounts of H2S at the Playa Vista site were documented in the Playa Vista archeology reports, as well as in L.A. city records that showed workers getting sick from H2S on the site. Because building on this wetland requires thousands of pilings--which act as conduits to bring the underground gases up to the surface--it increases the risk of students and residents being exposed to these toxins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001
Re "Sewage Spill Closes Beaches," Nov. 6: As a resident of Playa del Rey who works in El Segundo, I am perhaps more sensitive to the wild shenanigans that continue around the development of Playa Vista. Even if one dismisses the issue of the loss of this rare and valuable wetland, how can public officials and the public stand by as every type of illegal and dangerous action is undertaken in the relentless push to force this unfortunate project into existence? Over the past few years the residents here have witnessed the methodical removal of trees, the draining of portions of the wetland, the disappearance of birds and animals, the destruction to the land due to constant construction, the resultant unbearable traffic congestion and now the very real poisoning of the ocean water.
NEWS
March 12, 1992
It is incredible that Councilwoman Ruth Galanter could believe that she should have hegemony over growth at LAX simply because it is in her district. The constituents and their council members in other districts, as well as regional communities, have as much interest in the LAX developments as those in the Sixth District. Ruth Galanter haranguing about the Westside traffic congestion attributable to LAX (25%), is just an attempt to find a scapegoat for the devastating traffic congestions caused by massive Westside developments, which she approved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2001 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Soboroff, a politically connected real estate broker, civic volunteer and defeated mayoral candidate, was named Wednesday to head the Playa Vista project, the largest housing and commercial development venture in Los Angeles and one mired in conflicts for two decades. Developers of Playa Vista, which could house as many as 30,000 people and create office space for thousands more, hope Soboroff's experience with big developments will help him push the project past its remaining roadblocks.
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