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OPINION
December 2, 2006
As a professor of Romance languages, I was happy to read "Mandarin speaks to a growing audience" (Nov. 26). Dual-language schools such as the one described in the article are a great way to make students bilingual and bicultural. It makes little difference what the two languages are. The bilingual skills that students acquire will make it easier to learn another language and will also help them develop a mental agility that is useful in learning anything else. DOMENICO MACERI Santa Maria, Calif.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2008 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
How does a 19th Century Maori war chant figure into the college aspirations of a bunch of student athletes in El Segundo? At their South Bay school, it is all part of a cross cultural morale-boosting exercise, combining lessons in global awareness and the psychological underpinnings of victory -- with the added benefit of terrifying the opponent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2007 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
The idea for Vistamar School, a private college-prep academy in El Segundo, began five years ago with an innocuous question posed by a Manhattan Beach mother to a friend over lunch: Where will your daughter go to high school when she grows up? The friends didn't wonder long. Dissatisfied with the options then available, they collected a group of like-minded parents and set to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2007 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
The idea for Vistamar School, a private college-prep academy in El Segundo, began five years ago with an innocuous question posed by a Manhattan Beach mother to a friend over lunch: Where will your daughter go to high school when she grows up? The friends didn't wonder long. Dissatisfied with the options then available, they collected a group of like-minded parents and set to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2008 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
How does a 19th Century Maori war chant figure into the college aspirations of a bunch of student athletes in El Segundo? At their South Bay school, it is all part of a cross cultural morale-boosting exercise, combining lessons in global awareness and the psychological underpinnings of victory -- with the added benefit of terrifying the opponent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
It's not easy growing up gay in America, despite the nation's increasing acceptance of same-sex marriage and other issues of gay equality. Gay and lesbian teenagers across the United States are less likely to be happy, more likely to report harassment and more inclined to experiment with drugs and alcohol than the nation's straight teens, according to a new nationwide survey of more than 10,000 gay and lesbian young people. The survey , which will be released Thursday by the Human Rights Campaign, aWashington, D.C.-based civil rights group, is described as one of the largest ever to focus on the nation's gay youth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2009 | Carla Rivera
More than 600 elementary and middle school students at Crossroads School in Santa Monica will watch the swearing-in of the nation's 44th president today on 9-foot by 12-foot projection screens. Final exams were delayed a day for the high school students so they could participate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2008 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
When six Harvard Westlake students were expelled last month for stealing midterm exams at the academically rigorous school, the incident highlighted an old problem facing educators: cheating. A 2006 national survey found that more than 60% of high school students said they had cheated on a test, and the number of self-admitted cheaters has steadily risen over the years. Students today can use an array of high-tech gadgetry, challenging schools to keep pace.
OPINION
December 2, 2006
As a professor of Romance languages, I was happy to read "Mandarin speaks to a growing audience" (Nov. 26). Dual-language schools such as the one described in the article are a great way to make students bilingual and bicultural. It makes little difference what the two languages are. The bilingual skills that students acquire will make it easier to learn another language and will also help them develop a mental agility that is useful in learning anything else. DOMENICO MACERI Santa Maria, Calif.
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