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December 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Mobile e-mail provider Visto Corp. said a federal judge in Texas had ordered rival Seven Networks Inc. of Redwood City, Calif., to pay $7.7 million in damages for infringing three patents, affirming a jury's verdict reached in April. The ruling represents Visto's biggest victory yet in its legal crusade to protect several patents on technology used by wireless phone providers to deliver e-mail on their mobile networks. Visto, also based in Redwood City, also has sued Good Technology Inc.
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BUSINESS
December 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Mobile e-mail provider Visto Corp. said a federal judge in Texas had ordered rival Seven Networks Inc. of Redwood City, Calif., to pay $7.7 million in damages for infringing three patents, affirming a jury's verdict reached in April. The ruling represents Visto's biggest victory yet in its legal crusade to protect several patents on technology used by wireless phone providers to deliver e-mail on their mobile networks. Visto, also based in Redwood City, also has sued Good Technology Inc.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Handspring Inc. has introduced a test version of a program that provides access to corporate e-mail for users of its new Treo device, which combines a cell phone and a hand-held computer. The program, called Treo Mail, will let users of the device send and receive messages through corporate e-mail systems that run on Microsoft Corp.'s Exchange software. Other hand-held devices that include e-mail functions include Palm Inc.'s i705 and Research in Motion Ltd.'s BlackBerry.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2006 | From the Associated Press
NTP Inc., which successfully sued the maker of BlackBerry devices for infringement of wireless e-mail patents, said Monday that it was suing Palm Inc., maker of the Treo smart phone. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court, alleges that Palm's products, services, systems and processes have improperly used NTP's wireless e-mail technology. Palm's shares tumbled $1.17 to $14.24, the entire 7.6% loss coming after news of the suit broke.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2005 | From Associated Press
Mobile e-mail start-up Visto Corp. has sued Microsoft Corp. for allegedly infringing three of its patents related to how information is handled between servers and hand-held devices such as cellular phones. The lawsuit, which seeks unspecified monetary damages and a permanent injunction to stop the alleged infringement, was filed late Wednesday -- the same day Redwood Shores, Calif.-based Visto announced that NTP Inc.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came the desktop, now comes the "Webtop." The last few years have seen a steady migration of PC applications from desktop programs that are stored on your computer's hard drive to free tools that require nothing more than a Web browser to use. Web-based e-mail services, such as Hotmail (http://www.hotmail.com) or Yahoo Mail (http://www.yahoo.com), and Web calendars, including When.com (http://www.when.com) and Schedule-Online (http://www.scheduleonline.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER
The PC is dead. Long live the PC. No, the device that has penetrated half of U.S. households is not about to disappear. But paradoxically, the recent move by Pasadena-based Free-PC.com Inc. to give away 10,000 computers in exchange for the ability to hard-wire ads on their screens is another sign that the PC is losing its grip on the center of our computing experience. To understand why, first take a look back.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The prospect that high-capacity access to the Internet will be available soon via wireless devices is exciting techies in Silicon Valley and investors on Wall Street and overseas. Stocks of cellular telephone makers Motorola, Nokia of Finland and L.M. Ericsson of Sweden are selling at or near new highs because of expectations for the future value of wireless systems.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the outside, CMGI Inc. looks like a scattered jigsaw puzzle of a company--one that defies easy description because there are just too many pieces to fit together. Within its fold are more than 60 companies--from Web portal AltaVista to free Internet access provider 1stUp.com--leading some people to describe CMGI as a venture capital firm, a holding company, an incubator, or, using the latest fad word, a keiretsu, Japanese for a group of interlocking companies.
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