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Vistula River

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NEWS
May 26, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Problem--Water Pollution * The U.N. View--"Fresh water is a finite resource and, in many parts of the world, is becoming increasingly scarce. . . . An estimated 80% of all diseases in developing countries and one-third of the deaths are related to contaminated water." * The Case Study: Poland--At least half of Poland's river water is considered too polluted even for industrial use.
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NEWS
July 31, 2001 | From Associated Press
Thousands of workers scrambled to reinforce dikes with sandbags and evacuate villages Monday ahead of a 65-mile-long flood wave coursing down Poland's largest river. The brown waters of the Vistula rose above alert level in the capital, Warsaw, flooding beaches, gardens and sports centers inside the city's dikes. Emergency crews were on alert and posted fire engines and boats near possible weak points--including the Warsaw Zoo and a promenade--as the water crept higher.
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NEWS
January 19, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
It was almost 10 p.m., and the guests at a Warsaw dinner party, about half of them Polish journalists, began stealing discreet glances at their watches. Then someone asked if there was a radio in the house. No, the host replied, it was broken. Almost as if on cue, the guests rose, grabbed their coats and, with profuse apologies, headed for home. A Warsaw professor, lecturing in a church one evening recently, had the same experience. "Around 9:45, people began getting restless," he said.
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Problem--Water Pollution * The U.N. View--"Fresh water is a finite resource and, in many parts of the world, is becoming increasingly scarce. . . . An estimated 80% of all diseases in developing countries and one-third of the deaths are related to contaminated water." * The Case Study: Poland--At least half of Poland's river water is considered too polluted even for industrial use.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | From Associated Press
Thousands of workers scrambled to reinforce dikes with sandbags and evacuate villages Monday ahead of a 65-mile-long flood wave coursing down Poland's largest river. The brown waters of the Vistula rose above alert level in the capital, Warsaw, flooding beaches, gardens and sports centers inside the city's dikes. Emergency crews were on alert and posted fire engines and boats near possible weak points--including the Warsaw Zoo and a promenade--as the water crept higher.
NEWS
July 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of people were evacuated from six villages as flood waters that had swamped much of southern Poland overwhelmed dikes, emergency workers said. About 25 people have been killed by flooding and violent storms in Poland this month, including 12 since the situation worsened in the south last week. Thousands have been forced from their homes.
NEWS
August 17, 2001
A former Polish secret police officer was released from prison after serving 15 years for leading the 1984 abduction and killing of a popular anti-Communist priest. Grzegorz Piotrowski, 51, was released from the prison in the southern city of Opole. His release was the last among four secret police officers convicted in a hasty 1985 trial. Piotrowski's freedom comes as Poland renews efforts to convict more senior officials for the murder of the Rev.
TRAVEL
June 10, 2001
Please don't liken Krakow, Poland, to Prague, Czech Republic ("Poland's New Crowd Pleaser," May 20). We had read similar articles stating this, and it led us to a disappointing weeklong stay in Krakow last September. After being leveled by Mongols in the 13th century, Krakow's center was rebuilt on a grid. The wonderful mazelike quality of Prague's old town does not exist there. The Wawel, lovely as it is, sits on only a slight mound next to the Vistula River. No comparison can be made to the dramatic scale, views and prominence of Prague's castle.
OPINION
August 4, 2004
In the Aug. 1 article on the anniversary of the tragic Polish Home Army uprising ("Warsaw Remembers 200,000 Slain in 1944 Uprising"), The Times claims that "the Soviets stood idly by on the east side of the Vistula River" as Germans massacred the inhabitants of Warsaw. Idly? In fact, the Red Army, after staggering losses in men and tanks during its great summer offensive, was desperately fighting off a counterattack by the three elite SS divisions and two panzer divisions (equipped with the new Super-Tiger tanks)
NEWS
January 24, 1985 | United Press International
A suspended secret police general, testifying Wednesday in the trial of four subordinates charged with killing a pro-Solidarity priest, said his agents foiled a plot to kill Pope John Paul II during the pontiff's 1983 visit to Poland. Warsaw officials immediately denied that there was a plot to assassinate the Polish-born pontiff. In defending the credibility of his department, Gen. Zenon Platek--the Interior Ministry officer who was in charge of the secret policemen accused in the Oct.
NEWS
January 19, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
It was almost 10 p.m., and the guests at a Warsaw dinner party, about half of them Polish journalists, began stealing discreet glances at their watches. Then someone asked if there was a radio in the house. No, the host replied, it was broken. Almost as if on cue, the guests rose, grabbed their coats and, with profuse apologies, headed for home. A Warsaw professor, lecturing in a church one evening recently, had the same experience. "Around 9:45, people began getting restless," he said.
NEWS
January 10, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The key defendant in the trial of four secret police officers accused of killing a pro-Solidarity priest startled the court Wednesday with a bitter tirade against Poland's Roman Catholic Church and the government itself for failing to curb militant clergymen. Capt. Grzegorz Piotrowski admitted that he was "guilty to some degree" in the death of Father Jerzy Popieluszko last October.
MAGAZINE
March 16, 1986 | Robert Gillette
If you ever find yourself in Warsaw, chances are it is for reasons other than sampling the night life. To be fair about it, Warsaw offers a selection of small, Old World cafes ( kawiarnie ) where the visitor can sip an espresso or a brandy, enjoy a pastry and glimpse the ferment of intellectual Poland. Try the Nowy Swiat, at Nowy Swiat 61, or the Bombonierka on New Market Square. Drinking is another matter.
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