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May 6, 1996 | PAUL KARON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Thanksgiving Day some year in the not-too-distant future, and you're augered deeply into the living room sofa, having contributed immoderately to the season's decimation of the turkey population. Naturally, you're watching a football game--it has a lot of impact on that new 127-inch universal television-Internet view screen. But instead of passively watching the game as broadcast by the TV producers--the way it was done back in, oh, 1996--you, as they say, make the call. That is, you decide what view of the game to watch at any given moment, unrestrained by the angles of a particular camera.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 1996 | PAUL KARON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Thanksgiving Day some year in the not-too-distant future, and you're augered deeply into the living room sofa, having contributed immoderately to the season's decimation of the turkey population. Naturally, you're watching a football game--it has a lot of impact on that new 127-inch universal television-Internet view screen. But instead of passively watching the game as broadcast by the TV producers--the way it was done back in, oh, 1996--you, as they say, make the call. That is, you decide what view of the game to watch at any given moment, unrestrained by the angles of a particular camera.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 1994 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER
Humans frequently use their hands to communicate. They point when giving directions, hold up a hand to mean "stop," and gesture to say "come here." Even non-humans such as dogs can be trained to respond to hand signals. But can robots or automobiles? That's the question researchers at the University of Rochester and at UC San Diego are trying to answer in separate research projects.
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