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MAGAZINE
August 27, 2000
I read Jim Heimann's article with dismay and sadness ("Giving the High Sign," So SoCal, July 30). While he mentioned that putting up posters promoting the latest rap music is against city ordinances (albeit the cost of doing business for the record companies), the article seemed to glorify this activity. It was even a "how-to" for others to emulate. I am appalled. The posters only add yet another layer of visual pollution to what we Angelenos have to suffer and endure. Carole Howard Los Angeles
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OPINION
May 23, 2009
Re "Tagging parents?" editorial, May 19 With your "tagging" editorial, you're looking for the lowest common denominator. The City Council wants to pass a measure to -- get this -- make parents responsible. You support the measure with one hand, and with the other you fumble around looking for the drain plug. Peer pressure is referenced in your article, but who are the "peers"? Do they have parents? You even factor in the budding sociopath to spare his parents more grief. Well, who taught them?
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OPINION
August 12, 2002
Re "Billboard Fight May Change State Landscape," Aug. 6 and "Senate Tables Billboard Plan," Aug. 7: Under the smokescreen that the plan would give cities more control over billboards, it would actually allow hundreds of these visual polluters on our freeways and highways statewide, where they are not allowed at present. Assembly Bill 2087, carried by Assemblywoman Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach), which actually passed the Assembly, is the work of the same billboard lobbyist who tried to put billboards on L.A.'s freeways last year but, fortunately, failed.
OPINION
March 22, 2009
Re "No sign of many big signs," March 15 Michael McNeilly has been defacing Los Angeles property for decades now. He is a tagger, a graffiti "artist" whose only interest is feeding his ego and stoking his bank account. His company, SkyTag, boasts that you can see his tags from outer space. He is robbing the residents of our city of the right and access to unobstructed views of our mountains, beautiful skies and landscape. He is responsible for much of the visual pollution we all suffer, and he needs to be reined in. This latest stunt he is trying to pull -- apparently, trying to get buildings exempted from new supergraphics restrictions -- only underscores his motivation to take from the citizens what he has no right to. The City Council needs to drop the hammer on him, hard, and now. Stacey Rain Strickler Silver Lake -- I love supergraphics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1987 | RICHARDSIMON, Times Staff Writer
Auto dealer Richard Kim was hoping to attract more business when he put up a colorful hot air balloon advertising his car lot to motorists on the Santa Monica Freeway. What he got instead was a $250 fine for violating Los Angeles' new sign law. Kim was the first person to be prosecuted under the law--for violating a prohibition on advertising that "constitutes a hazard to the safe and efficient operation of vehicles upon a street or freeway."
OPINION
March 22, 2009
Re "No sign of many big signs," March 15 Michael McNeilly has been defacing Los Angeles property for decades now. He is a tagger, a graffiti "artist" whose only interest is feeding his ego and stoking his bank account. His company, SkyTag, boasts that you can see his tags from outer space. He is robbing the residents of our city of the right and access to unobstructed views of our mountains, beautiful skies and landscape. He is responsible for much of the visual pollution we all suffer, and he needs to be reined in. This latest stunt he is trying to pull -- apparently, trying to get buildings exempted from new supergraphics restrictions -- only underscores his motivation to take from the citizens what he has no right to. The City Council needs to drop the hammer on him, hard, and now. Stacey Rain Strickler Silver Lake -- I love supergraphics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1987 | GARY D. SUTTLE, Gary D. Suttle lives in Allied Gardens and frequently hikes at Mission Trails
The proposed extension of California 52 from Tierrasanta to Santee has caused a stir, mainly over the struggle to obtain funds for the project and the forced relocation of hundreds of households in the highway's path. But virtually nothing has been said about how the roadway will degrade Mission Trails Regional Park. At more than 5,000 acres, the park stands as the last sizable expanse of natural open space in metropolitan San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2008 | David Zahniser and Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writers
Removing a major hurdle to growth at the Port of Los Angeles, harbor officials have agreed to pay $12 million over the next year on pollution reduction initiatives in adjacent San Pedro and Wilmington, officials said Wednesday. In the tentative agreement with environmental groups, the port promised to create a trust fund to address the long-term effects of port operations on local neighborhoods, including $6 million for the installation of air filtration systems in Wilmington public schools.
REAL ESTATE
June 23, 1985
One of the many wonderful things about landscaping is that it has the potential of mitigating the visual pollution of an encroaching, man-made world of concrete and steel. Cultivated and protected, it can in time, block from view architectural and planning outrages, while also lending our cityscapes and freeways texture, tone and color. The landscaping along freeways is particularly critical.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2008 | David Zahniser and Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writers
Removing a major hurdle to growth at the Port of Los Angeles, harbor officials have agreed to pay $12 million over the next year on pollution reduction initiatives in adjacent San Pedro and Wilmington, officials said Wednesday. In the tentative agreement with environmental groups, the port promised to create a trust fund to address the long-term effects of port operations on local neighborhoods, including $6 million for the installation of air filtration systems in Wilmington public schools.
OPINION
August 12, 2002
Re "Billboard Fight May Change State Landscape," Aug. 6 and "Senate Tables Billboard Plan," Aug. 7: Under the smokescreen that the plan would give cities more control over billboards, it would actually allow hundreds of these visual polluters on our freeways and highways statewide, where they are not allowed at present. Assembly Bill 2087, carried by Assemblywoman Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach), which actually passed the Assembly, is the work of the same billboard lobbyist who tried to put billboards on L.A.'s freeways last year but, fortunately, failed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Planning Director Mike Kamino unrolled a 5-foot-long map of Agoura Hills and drew Xs through a cluster of red dots north of the Ventura Freeway. The dots stood for three billboards that had been torn down a couple of years ago. Three down and 11 to go. "Eventually, they'll become extinct," said Kamino, who has watched the city's 19-year battle against billboards, pole signs and other forms of "visual pollution," as the anti-sign forces call it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1987 | GARY D. SUTTLE, Gary D. Suttle lives in Allied Gardens and frequently hikes at Mission Trails
The proposed extension of California 52 from Tierrasanta to Santee has caused a stir, mainly over the struggle to obtain funds for the project and the forced relocation of hundreds of households in the highway's path. But virtually nothing has been said about how the roadway will degrade Mission Trails Regional Park. At more than 5,000 acres, the park stands as the last sizable expanse of natural open space in metropolitan San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1987 | RICHARDSIMON, Times Staff Writer
Auto dealer Richard Kim was hoping to attract more business when he put up a colorful hot air balloon advertising his car lot to motorists on the Santa Monica Freeway. What he got instead was a $250 fine for violating Los Angeles' new sign law. Kim was the first person to be prosecuted under the law--for violating a prohibition on advertising that "constitutes a hazard to the safe and efficient operation of vehicles upon a street or freeway."
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