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Vital Intervention And Directional Alternatives

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2000 | IRIS SCHNEIDER
Every Saturday morning, Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies attempt to push a reluctant group of teenagers in the right direction in a program called VIDA, for Vital Intervention and Directional Alternatives. Gathering at 7, the deputies cajole, embarrass, insult, coax, encourage and work the youngsters hard. They say the things that parents are too timid, too frustrated, too powerless or simply too tired to say. And they hope that this time, the teenagers will listen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2000 | IRIS SCHNEIDER
Every Saturday morning, Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies attempt to push a reluctant group of teenagers in the right direction in a program called VIDA, for Vital Intervention and Directional Alternatives. Gathering at 7, the deputies cajole, embarrass, insult, coax, encourage and work the youngsters hard. They say the things that parents are too timid, too frustrated, too powerless or simply too tired to say. And they hope that this time, the teenagers will listen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2003 | Jenifer Ragland, Times Staff Writer
Ventura County authorities are not doing enough to deter young people from delinquent behavior and incarceration, a new grand jury report concludes. The report, released Friday, urges the Ventura County Sheriff's Department and the Ventura County Probation Agency to work together to establish more programs for troubled young people. Such programs should be aimed at steering them from drug and alcohol use and crime and toward academic and social success, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2002 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County students who continually ditch class should be incarcerated and those at risk of becoming habitual truants should be put in a "boot-camp" style program to get them back on track, according to a grand jury report. Citing U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He was a kid whose life ambition, authorities complained, was to cuss and brawl and slather walls with graffiti--a hard-core wild child who makes police want to slap handcuffs on real fast and forget. But in this case, Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies didn't forget 16-year-old Oscar Cornejo, who graduated recently from a pilot program aimed at straightening out troubled youths before they collide again with the criminal justice system.
OPINION
March 11, 2001 | JOE DOMANICK, Joe Domanick is author of "To Protect and to Serve: LAPD's Century of War in the City of Dreams."
Soon after he was sworn in as L.A. County's 30th sheriff in 1998, Lee Baca began to express a philosophy of policing that was radically different from anything that had ever come out of the Sheriff's Department and the Los Angeles Police Department. He spoke of his police force being an "enemy" of bigotry in all its forms and of the necessity of his deputies to revere the Constitution and Bill of Rights.
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