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Vital Link Program

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once shy and adrift, high school senior Michelle Knapp says she now has a career focus and a secret weapon: a three-step method for handling criticism. First, the 17-year-old Los Alamitos high student explains, she tries the sponge approach, in which she "sits there and takes it." If that's not appropriate, she says, she tries "prompt and paraphrase," which means restating to the critic what she has just heard.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1995
Some educators say that public schools often do a good job serving the best 25% of the students, those bound for college, and the worst 25%, those clearly needing help. But the 50% who make up the broad middle, slogging through class and earning a C average, too often are overlooked. To help remedy the perceived shortcoming, a Washington-based group of chief executives of mid-sized companies called the American Business Conference started a new program four years ago.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1995
Some educators say that public schools often do a good job serving the best 25% of the students, those bound for college, and the worst 25%, those clearly needing help. But the 50% who make up the broad middle, slogging through class and earning a C average, too often are overlooked. To help remedy the perceived shortcoming, a Washington-based group of chief executives of mid-sized companies called the American Business Conference started a new program four years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once shy and adrift, high school senior Michelle Knapp says she now has a career focus and a secret weapon: a three-step method for handling criticism. First, the 17-year-old Los Alamitos high student explains, she tries the sponge approach, in which she "sits there and takes it." If that's not appropriate, she says, she tries "prompt and paraphrase," which means restating to the critic what she has just heard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to motivate students who are not college-bound to keep at their studies, a group of chief executive officers of businesses nationwide will join educators in Orange County in a pilot project aimed at paving a path to entry-level jobs for high school graduates. The program is a joint venture of school districts in Orange County, Fort Worth, and Morris County, N.J., and the American Business Conference, an organization of 100 CEOs of mid-sized companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998 | PHIL DAVIS
High school students in the Los Alamitos Unified School District can start getting two report cards--one with classroom grades for their parents and another to rate their job skills for potential employers. The Vital Link program is geared toward showing employers that students are learning the skills they need to enter the work force after high school.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Grimes had never made anything much bigger than an ashtray in ceramics class, but there he stood, digging clay from beneath his nails and examining the lines of the full-size automobile model he'd been carving all week. Grimes, an 18-year-old Fountain Valley High School graduate, was one of eight candidates for a trainee job in one of the most exclusive trades in the automotive business: model making.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Grimes had never made anything much bigger than an ashtray in ceramics class, but there he stood, digging clay from beneath his nails and examining the lines of the full-size automobile model he'd been carving on all week. Grimes, an 18-year-old Fountain Valley High School graduate, is one of eight candidates for a trainee job in one of the most exclusive trades in the automotive business--a model maker.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Promising apples for teachers in more ways than one, business people spoke glowingly of technology's future in the classroom at the Milken Foundation's Education Conference last weekend. Yet technology's role at present is minimal--the computer game "Mortal Kombat" outsells all the educational software on the market--and the schools remain in crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to motivate students who are not college-bound to keep at their studies, a group of chief executive officers of businesses nationwide will join educators in Orange County in a pilot project aimed at paving a path to entry-level jobs for high school graduates. The program is a joint venture of school districts in Orange County, Fort Worth, and Morris County, N.J., and the American Business Conference, an organization of 100 CEOs of mid-sized companies.
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