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NEWS
May 16, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's chances for pushing through political and economic changes were strengthened Monday by election results giving social reformers seats in runoff balloting for a newly created Soviet assembly. A crusading prosecutor who accused conservative Politburo member Yegor K. Ligachev of blocking an inquiry into high-level corruption defeated more than two dozen other candidates in Leningrad. The editor of the taboo-breaking Ogonyok magazine and some reformers from the Baltic states also were on the winners' list after Sunday's balloting for the Congress of People's Deputies.
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NEWS
May 16, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's chances for pushing through political and economic changes were strengthened Monday by election results giving social reformers seats in runoff balloting for a newly created Soviet assembly. A crusading prosecutor who accused conservative Politburo member Yegor K. Ligachev of blocking an inquiry into high-level corruption defeated more than two dozen other candidates in Leningrad. The editor of the taboo-breaking Ogonyok magazine and some reformers from the Baltic states also were on the winners' list after Sunday's balloting for the Congress of People's Deputies.
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NEWS
November 22, 1987 | United Press International
The editor of a Soviet magazine said on Saturday that an emergency system triggered only six seconds before liftoff had saved a crew of cosmonauts from a Challenger-like disaster. Vitaly A. Korotich, editor of the magazine Ogonyok, mentioned the episode in a Radio Moscow interview about the problems he has encountered getting permission to publish controversial material.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | From the Washington Post
In his first public assessment of Sunday's historic legislative elections, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said Wednesday that the defeat of scores of top Communist Party candidates was a natural part of the democratic process and should not be cause for alarm.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | DAVID REMNICK, The Washington Post
Mikhail S. Gorbachev is no millionaire, according to a leading Soviet magazine editor, but no one should be shocked that his wife, Raisa, can afford expensive, fashionable clothes now and then. As head of state and general secretary of the Communist Party, Gorbachev brings home an annual salary of "something around 18,000 rubles"--or $28,000 at the inflated official exchange rate--Vitaly A. Korotich, editor of Ogonyok, said in an interview Tuesday.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Challenged to prove its commitment to glasnost by disclosing its finances, the Soviet Communist Party reported Friday that its current annual budget is nearly $2.7 billion, most of which is financed by members' dues. The party newspaper Pravda said it had received many letters asking about the organization's finances, which had not been disclosed even to most party members for decades.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The former Communist Party leader in the Soviet Central Asian republic of Uzbekistan was reported Wednesday to have been arrested on charges of corruption, along with the republic's former president and two other top party officials, in a continuing campaign against widespread corruption there.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
It was clear in the first 10 minutes that this was going to be a meeting unlike any ever held behind the Kremlin's walls. As the first speaker read a traditional statement of congratulations Thursday to the newly elected members of the Congress of People's Deputies, an unidentified deputy strode to the front of the hall and seized the microphone. Standing beneath a 20-foot-tall statue of the founder of the Soviet state, V. I. Lenin, he demanded a minute of silence in memory of 21 people killed by Red Army troops in a protest demonstration last month in the republic of Georgia.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vitaly A. Korotich, editor-in-chief of Ogonyok, couldn't hide his delight. Flanked by two subordinates, he scanned freshly prepared proofs of the muckraking weekly's next expose, certain to raise that thunderclap of controversy the Russians call skandal. "Look at this!" he exclaimed to a visitor.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
A long-simmering controversy surrounding an editor at the forefront of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's glasnost policy took an ominous turn Wednesday when the Communist Party newspaper Pravda published a sharp attack on the editor by an influential group of conservative writers. Such cultural battles have extraordinary political significance in countries like the Soviet Union, where rulers still rely more on ideology than on a public mandate for their legitimacy.
NEWS
October 29, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Vitaly A. Korotich was less than enthusiastic when he was offered the editor's job at the magazine Ogonyok (Little Flame) in early 1986. "It was one of the dullest, most reactionary rags in our country," he said not long ago in an interview. "I only bought this magazine for the crossword puzzle." Besides, he recalled, his father had warned him years ago about going into journalism when he was first attracted to it as a career right out of high school.
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