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Vitaly Ginzburg

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Vitaly Ginzburg, the Russian physicist who played a key role in the Soviet Union's development of the hydrogen bomb and who later won a Nobel Prize for his work on the theoretical underpinnings of superconductivity, died in Moscow late Sunday of cardiac arrest. He was 93 and had been in ill health for some time. A pioneering theoretical physicist who often deprecated his own abilities in mathematics, Ginzburg made seminal contributions in a number of areas of physics, including quantum theory, astrophysics and radioastronomy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Vitaly Ginzburg, the Russian physicist who played a key role in the Soviet Union's development of the hydrogen bomb and who later won a Nobel Prize for his work on the theoretical underpinnings of superconductivity, died in Moscow late Sunday of cardiac arrest. He was 93 and had been in ill health for some time. A pioneering theoretical physicist who often deprecated his own abilities in mathematics, Ginzburg made seminal contributions in a number of areas of physics, including quantum theory, astrophysics and radioastronomy.
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NEWS
November 11, 2009
Ginzburg obituary: In Tuesday's Section A, the headline on the obituary of Vitaly Ginzburg said he was born in 1922. The Russian physicist, who played a key role in the Soviet Union's development of the hydrogen bomb and later won a Nobel Prize for his work on the theoretical underpinnings of superconductivity, was born Oct. 4, 1916.
WORLD
December 11, 2003 | From Associated Press
Iranian human rights activist Shirin Ebadi accepted her Nobel Peace Prize on Wednesday with a warning that civil liberties and human rights must not be allowed to fall prey to the "war on terrorism" launched in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. Ebadi, the first Muslim woman and the first Iranian to win the award, said that even Western democracies have allowed their traditions of freedom and basic rights to be eroded. "Regulations restricting human rights and basic freedoms ...
SCIENCE
October 8, 2003 | K.C. Cole, Times Staff Writer
The Nobel Prize was awarded Tuesday to three physicists from the U.S. and Russia who explained the bizarre behavior of materials at the extremes of cold -- phenomena that have turned out to have a wealth of practical applications. Anthony Leggett of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign developed the theory explaining a perplexing form of helium that seemed to defy known laws of physics.
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