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Vitaly Komar

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January 28, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA
In 1978 a team of Soviet artists named Vitaly Komar and Alex Melamid emigrated to New York with visions of capitalist paradise dancing in their heads. Six years later they had indeed conquered the western art world with a series of paintings that came as close as an artist gets to hitting a home run; the critics loved them and they sold like hot cakes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Lynell George
FROM Soviet realism with a twist to portraits of American rap stars might seem something of a leap -- but not necessarily for Alexander Melamid. The Russian-born artist has often been interested in creating more than a bit of political havoc. Known for decades for work that was both bold commentary and incisive satire, Melamid and his creative partner, Vitaly Komar, were renowned as conceptual art rebels in Soviet Russia and were also considered to be the architects of the Soviet Realist Pop Art movement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Lynell George
FROM Soviet realism with a twist to portraits of American rap stars might seem something of a leap -- but not necessarily for Alexander Melamid. The Russian-born artist has often been interested in creating more than a bit of political havoc. Known for decades for work that was both bold commentary and incisive satire, Melamid and his creative partner, Vitaly Komar, were renowned as conceptual art rebels in Soviet Russia and were also considered to be the architects of the Soviet Realist Pop Art movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2000 | ALEX HALBERSTADT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Monday night, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Auditorium, Russian emigre artists Vitaly Komar and Alex Melamid stood beneath large images depicting Van Gogh's 1889 self-portrait projected onto various areas of the human body. Part of a performance titled "The Healing Power of Art," the images supposedly showed patients being cured of everything from insomnia to depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
When Russian emigre artists Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid were students, nearly 30 years ago at the Stroganoff Art Institute in Moscow, Los Angeles was a mysterious place that seemed to have extraordinary significance. "It was the ultimate destination for Europeans who went to the United States," Melamid says. Los Angeles was also a city that reversed Russians' mental images of geography.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2000 | ALEX HALBERSTADT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On Monday night, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Auditorium, Russian emigre artists Vitaly Komar and Alex Melamid stood beneath large images depicting Van Gogh's 1889 self-portrait projected onto various areas of the human body. Part of a performance titled "The Healing Power of Art," the images supposedly showed patients being cured of everything from insomnia to depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1999
Art/Museums Paintings by Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, a pair of Conceptual artists who commissioned various market-research firms to poll people as to what they most wanted to see in a painting, are on view in "The People's Choice," closing Sunday at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Today through Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Adults, $5; seniors, $3; students, $2; children 6 and younger, free. (805) 963-4364.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1989
The following are "unofficial" Soviet arts festival events and exhibitions. They were inspired, but not sanctioned, by the festival. -"Fabulous Egg Salad," through Nov. 2, Tohubohu Gallery. This exhibition was designed as a spoof on the Faberge eggs and features eggs inspired by Mayor Maureen O'Connor and Steve Garvey. -Freedom Arts Festival, through Nov. 15, Symphony Towers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | LEAH OLLMAN
The San Diego Arts Festival: Treasures of the Soviet Union, which begins today, has its official and its unofficial events--those sponsored by the city, and those organized and funded independently. Until recently, most art of the Soviet Union divided itself along similar lines, with members of the Artists Union producing official art, supported by the government, and all other artists' work considered unofficial. The categories were never hard and fast, and now glasnost and perestroika are rendering them obsolete.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
When Russian emigre artists Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid were students, nearly 30 years ago at the Stroganoff Art Institute in Moscow, Los Angeles was a mysterious place that seemed to have extraordinary significance. "It was the ultimate destination for Europeans who went to the United States," Melamid says. Los Angeles was also a city that reversed Russians' mental images of geography.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1990 | KRISTINE McKENNA
In 1978 a team of Soviet artists named Vitaly Komar and Alex Melamid emigrated to New York with visions of capitalist paradise dancing in their heads. Six years later they had indeed conquered the western art world with a series of paintings that came as close as an artist gets to hitting a home run; the critics loved them and they sold like hot cakes.
HOME & GARDEN
April 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
It's your choice: turn left to see "America's Most Unwanted Painting." Turn right for "America's Most Wanted Painting." The two options are being presented by Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid in their "People's Choice" show at the Alternative Museum in Manhattan. The installation reflects the two Russian emigre artists' attempt to answer a simple question: What kind of art do the American people want? Komar and Melamid used an authentic, above-board polling service to find out.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Everyone knows that art can never be all things to all people. Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, a pair of Russian emigre artists who have worked together for more than 20 years, deliver the next best thing: art that contains the highest number of popular elements for the majority of people, as determined by a poll of a cross-section of U.S. citizens.
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