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Vitaly Yurchenko

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1994 | MIKHAIL P. LYUBIMOV, Retired KGB colonel Mikhail P. Lyubimov served as an intelligence officer in London, 1961-65, in Moscow, 1964-76, and was KGB resident in Copenhagen from 1976-80. He now writes novels. and
On a spring morning in 1985, Gen. Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, the head of the KGB foreign intelligence directorate and future chief of the spy agency, was roused from his sleep for some sensational information: The head of the Central Intelligence Agency's Soviet and Eastern Europe counterintelligence department, Aldrich H. Ames, had offered his services to the KGB. Ames had already identified the first batch of American agents in the Soviet Union.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1994 | MIKHAIL P. LYUBIMOV, Retired KGB colonel Mikhail P. Lyubimov served as an intelligence officer in London, 1961-65, in Moscow, 1964-76, and was KGB resident in Copenhagen from 1976-80. He now writes novels. and
On a spring morning in 1985, Gen. Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, the head of the KGB foreign intelligence directorate and future chief of the spy agency, was roused from his sleep for some sensational information: The head of the Central Intelligence Agency's Soviet and Eastern Europe counterintelligence department, Aldrich H. Ames, had offered his services to the KGB. Ames had already identified the first batch of American agents in the Soviet Union.
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NEWS
November 7, 1985 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The wife of a Soviet trade representative stationed in Toronto apparently has leaped to her death, but Canadian government and police officials Wednesday denied there was any connection between her death and the decision of KGB agent Vitaly Yurchenko to return to Moscow. The suicide of the Soviet woman Tuesday set off speculation that she might be linked to Yurchenko.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was at the same time one of the CIA's greatest Cold War coups and most humbling embarrassments, and it has only been recently, after nearly a decade, that the agency has managed to come to terms with it. But now, with the arrest of a suspected CIA mole for the Russians, the bizarre case of KGB defector Vitaly Yurchenko is posing a new riddle for the international intelligence community, provoking tormented speculation and re-examination of what really happened.
NEWS
November 6, 1985 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet news agency Tass accused the United States on Tuesday of kidnaping and torturing KGB officer Vitaly Yurchenko in an "act of terrorism." At the same time, Secretary of State George P. Shultz said the charges Yurchenko has made against the CIA are "totally false." Shultz said that he and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who met for four hours Tuesday, briefly discussed the case of Yurchenko, described by U.S. officials as a top KGB officer who defected last July.
NEWS
August 10, 1986 | United Press International
Double defector Vitaly Yurchenko, the KGB colonel who exposed a former CIA operative as a spy for the Soviet intelligence agency before redefecting to Moscow last year, has resumed his work in Soviet intelligence, a Moscow newspaper said Saturday. The Moscow Communist Party newspaper Moskovskaya Pravda carried a full-page interview with Yurchenko, previously reported by some Western media as having been executed in March following his return to the Soviet Union.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was at the same time one of the CIA's greatest Cold War coups and most humbling embarrassments, and it has only been recently, after nearly a decade, that the agency has managed to come to terms with it. But now, with the arrest of a suspected CIA mole for the Russians, the bizarre case of KGB defector Vitaly Yurchenko is posing a new riddle for the international intelligence community, provoking tormented speculation and re-examination of what really happened.
NEWS
November 20, 1985 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
A White House investigation secretly ordered last week into the CIA's handling of Soviet KGB officer Vitaly Yurchenko has been delegated to President Reagan's newly revamped Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, Administration and congressional sources said Tuesday. The civilian panel, charged with helping the White House set national espionage policies, was cut from 21 to 14 members Nov. 1, partly in an effort to end a history of bitter internal disputes.
NEWS
February 23, 1986 | United Press International
The State Department said Friday that a Soviet KGB colonel, accompanied by his 7-year-old son and a female friend, has defected and is in the United States. State Department spokesman Charles Redman confirmed reports that Viktor Gundarev, accompanied by the two others, had defected in Athens. In response to a question, Redman read a statement to reporters saying that the three are in the United States and identifying Gundarev as a colonel in the Soviet KGB intelligence agency.
NEWS
November 7, 1985 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
CIA officials have acknowledged that the agency made mistakes in its handling of high-level Soviet KGB officer Vitaly Yurchenko and agreed to appoint an independent expert to review its actions, a Senate Intelligence Committee spokesman said Wednesday. "The committee's conclusion was that security was lax," the spokesman said after "working-level" CIA officials privately briefed the panel Tuesday night. He said the officials promised to give the committee the results of the review in six weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1993 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications.
A useful operating principle for journal ists is that defectors should never be believed and that secret police are by definition untrustworthy. I would allow no national partiality in the application of these rules, but let's confine ourselves for the moment to the KGB. On Aug. 1, 1985, Vitaly Yurchenko, a colonel in the KGB, walked into the U.S. Embassy in Rome.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Edward Lee Howard, the former CIA agent who defected to the Soviet Union after allegedly passing vital U.S. secrets, has been permanently expelled from Hungary as a result of the pro-democracy upheaval there and is now in another East Bloc country, U.S. sources disclosed Wednesday. The expulsion has prompted U.S. officials to redouble efforts to apprehend Howard, but it is not clear whether those prospects are good. Hungary revoked Howard's asylum at least a month ago at the urging of U.S.
NEWS
August 10, 1986 | United Press International
Double defector Vitaly Yurchenko, the KGB colonel who exposed a former CIA operative as a spy for the Soviet intelligence agency before redefecting to Moscow last year, has resumed his work in Soviet intelligence, a Moscow newspaper said Saturday. The Moscow Communist Party newspaper Moskovskaya Pravda carried a full-page interview with Yurchenko, previously reported by some Western media as having been executed in March following his return to the Soviet Union.
NEWS
February 23, 1986 | United Press International
The State Department said Friday that a Soviet KGB colonel, accompanied by his 7-year-old son and a female friend, has defected and is in the United States. State Department spokesman Charles Redman confirmed reports that Viktor Gundarev, accompanied by the two others, had defected in Athens. In response to a question, Redman read a statement to reporters saying that the three are in the United States and identifying Gundarev as a colonel in the Soviet KGB intelligence agency.
NEWS
November 20, 1985 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
A White House investigation secretly ordered last week into the CIA's handling of Soviet KGB officer Vitaly Yurchenko has been delegated to President Reagan's newly revamped Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, Administration and congressional sources said Tuesday. The civilian panel, charged with helping the White House set national espionage policies, was cut from 21 to 14 members Nov. 1, partly in an effort to end a history of bitter internal disputes.
NEWS
November 15, 1985 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
KGB officer Vitaly Yurchenko ridiculed and condemned the CIA on Thursday and said CIA agents tried to intercept him at the gates of the Soviet Embassy the night he escaped from his guard. Yurchenko, leading a pre-summit Soviet chorus of accusations that the United States is guilty of "state terrorism" against him, said the CIA had fabricated a story that he decided to return home only after his mistress in Canada spurned his proposal that she defect and join him.
NEWS
November 11, 1985 | MAURA DOLAN and MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writers
The Soviet Consulate on Sunday denounced as "dirty lies" aimed at spoiling Soviet-Canadian relations a report that KGB officer Vitaly Yurchenko secretly met with a Soviet diplomat's wife here last month and begged her to defect to the United States. The Los Angeles Times report, which said the CIA brought Yurchenko to a meeting with Valentina Yereskovsky, the wife of the Soviet consul general, was an insult "to all Soviet women who stay abroad with their diplomat husbands," the statement said.
NEWS
November 14, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
On-again, off-again defector Vitaly Yurchenko told a news conference today that CIA agents tried to intercept him at the gates of the Soviet Embassy on the night of his escape and later fabricated a story about a lover in Canada to cover up their incompetence. Yurchenko, 50, who the United States says is a top KGB member who voluntarily defected in Rome last August, spoke at a news conference packed with Soviet and foreign journalists.
NEWS
November 14, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
On-again, off-again defector Vitaly Yurchenko told a news conference today that CIA agents tried to intercept him at the gates of the Soviet Embassy on the night of his escape and later fabricated a story about a lover in Canada to cover up their incompetence. Yurchenko, 50, who the United States says is a top KGB member who voluntarily defected in Rome last August, spoke at a news conference packed with Soviet and foreign journalists.
NEWS
November 11, 1985 | MAURA DOLAN and MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writers
The Soviet Consulate on Sunday denounced as "dirty lies" aimed at spoiling Soviet-Canadian relations a report that KGB officer Vitaly Yurchenko secretly met with a Soviet diplomat's wife here last month and begged her to defect to the United States. The Los Angeles Times report, which said the CIA brought Yurchenko to a meeting with Valentina Yereskovsky, the wife of the Soviet consul general, was an insult "to all Soviet women who stay abroad with their diplomat husbands," the statement said.
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