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NEWS
July 1, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Sweet potatoes are often regarded as a healthier alternative to the white potato, which has been recently maligned as “Public Enemy No. 1” in America’s battle of the bulge. Some would even say that sweet potatoes are to white potatoes what brown rice is to white. But in a head-to-head comparison, these two tubers are seemingly very similar. In a 100-gram portion, the white potato has 92 calories, 21 grams of carbs, 2.3 grams of dietary fiber, 2.3 g of protein and 17% of the recommended daily value of vitamin C. The same amount of sweet potato, on the other hand, has 90 calories, 21 grams of carbs, 3 grams of fiber, 2 grams of protein, 35% of the recommended daily value of vitamin C and 380% of the daily recommended value of vitamin A. Importantly, both have won Vegetable of the Month designations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
If you are taking vitamin supplements to reduce your risk of heart disease or cancer, a government panel of health experts wants you to know that you're probably wasting your money. In some cases, those vitamins may actually increase your risk of cancer. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force came to this conclusion Monday after reviewing dozens of studies, including many randomized clinical trials, considered the gold standard for medical research. The task force's final recommendation was published online Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995
Orchids to The Times for publicizing the UNICEF announcement that Vitamin A tablets costing 2 cents each could save the lives of at least a million children annually (June 16). In fact, UNICEF's annual publication, "The State of the World's Children," states that the lives of 8 million children each year could be saved by increased use of oral rehydration salts to prevent death from loss of fluids, vaccinations, Vitamin A, iodine and iron. The total cost for these proven lifesavers? The Vitamin A, iodine and iron could be put into a vitamin pill costing about 2 cents each and also including other needed vitamins and minerals.
SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists have identified a simple, inexpensive compound that made cancer drugs more effective in mice and helped human patients weather the toxic side effects of chemotherapy. But even as they touted their experimental results, they acknowledged that their remedy was unlikely to inspire the vigorous - and expensive - research necessary to win regulatory approval and join the ranks of mainstream medicine. The drug in question is vitamin C. When absorbed from foods such as oranges, strawberries, broccoli and kale, it feeds neurotransmitters and helps the body make collagen, among other important functions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1994
In response to "Vitamin Makers Can Swallow New Rules," editorial, Jan. 4: While I support the Food and Drug Administration's restrictions on the claims that can be made for dietary supplements, something needs to be done about the Catch-22 inherent in market-driven medicine. The bee-sting therapy you reported about (Jan. 4) is a classic example. It is scientifically unproven and will likely remain that way because scientific testing is almost always connected with intellectual property rights.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Vitamin D has emerged as something of a wonder supplement, according to the claims of dozens of studies published in the past few years. Researchers have suggested that adequate levels of the nutrient not only strengthen bones, but reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and other conditions. Several studies also suggest Americans are not getting enough vitamin D, which is synthesized in the skin from sun exposure and found in certain foods, such as fortified milk and cereal, some types of fish and legumes.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
If you're trying to ward off the sniffles, you can take vitamin D supplements out of your shopping cart: A new study reports that dosing with the vitamin does nothing to prevent colds or other forms of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). The effect of vitamin D on the immune system has been debated for a long time. Controlled laboratory research has shown that vitamin D has several beneficial effects on the immune system, and some studies conducted in the past have suggested that people with low levels of the vitamin are at higher risk for URTIs.
NEWS
March 17, 1991
Please accept my congratulations on your coverage of Linus Pauling, "A Prized Fighter" (Feb. 26). It was not necessary to represent the ignoramuses who are against (Vitamin) C only because they don't know about it. Pauling's book, "Live Longer and Better," is largely devoted to clear proof of his positions with regard to C, with no room for doubt. Pauling is a scientist. When he makes a statement, it's supportable. A common criticism of him stating that he is a scientist and not a doctor, therefore, he doesn't know what he is talking about, is a very weak argument, particularly by those who "practice" medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1993
In response to "A Healthy Dose of Science," editorial, June 17: The Food and Drug Administration's plan to have vitamin and supplement sellers document their health claims on the basis of "significant scientific agreement" has been too long in coming. As a family physician in practice for over 30 years, I've always been aware of the value of vitamins and food supplements and recommend them when indicated. But I've been frustrated by the unfounded hype which encourages people to spend their hard-earned money on pills when they can get the same benefits, at less cost, from ordinary foods.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Getting enough vitamin D may help prevent women from losing their vision in old age. That's the quick and easy conclusion from a new study, just perhaps not one that will require you to change your diet. In a study of 1,313 women ages 50 to 79, researchers from the University of Buffalo in New York found that women with adequate levels of vitamin D were at 48% decreased odds for developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD) compared with women with insufficient levels of the vitamin.
SCIENCE
December 31, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease were able to care for themselves longer and needed less help performing everyday chores when they took a daily capsule containing 2,000 IUs of alpha tocopherol, or vitamin E, a study has found. Compared with subjects who took placebo pills, those who took daily supplements of the antioxidant vitamin E and were followed for an average of two years and three months delayed their loss of function by a little over six months on average, a 19% improvement.
SCIENCE
December 17, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Looking for ways to save money in 2014? Here's some advice from doctors: Stop buying vitamins. Time after time, studies have shown that vitamin and mineral supplements don't prevent disease or death. And yet consumers keep buying them, lament the authors of an editorial published in Tuesday's edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine. A 2011 report from the National Center for Health Statistics estimated that 53% of American adults used some type of supplement in the years 2003 to 2006, with multivitamin/multimineral formulations being the most popular.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Don't expect to get a vitamin boost from 7-Up drinks any more. The maker of the beverage, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, agreed to stop adding vitamin E to some of its drinks and halt claims that the product has antioxidants as part of a settlement with a health advocacy group. The company had been infusing small amounts of vitamin E into some varieties of 7-Up -- regular and diet Cherry Antioxidant, Mixed Berry Antioxidant and Pomegranate Antioxidant -- when the firm was sued  in November in U.S. District Court in California on behalf of a Sherman Oaks man. The Center for Science in the Public Interest also took issue with the images of berries and pomegranates on the soda's labels, saying it gave the impression that the antioxidants came from fruit instead of the added vitamin E. “Soda is not a health food, and should not be marketed as a healthy source of antioxidants or other nutrients,” Steve Gardner, litigation director at CSPI, said in a statement.  “It's to the credit of Dr Pepper Snapple Group that it carefully considered these concerns, and worked collaboratively to resolve the dispute without further litigation.  The end result is a big plus for consumers.” Texas-based Dr Pepper Snapple Group did not immediately return calls seeking comment.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
More than half of American women over the age of 60 take vitamin D and calcium supplements, but the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said this week that they're probably wasting their money. In a new recommendations from the federal government's expert panel on preventive medicine, the task force says that most postmenopausal women should not take vitamin D and calcium to reduce their risk of bone fractures. The dosages assessed were 400 international units (IUs) of vitamin D3 and 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day. The conclusions are based on an analysis of six randomized trials designed to study the health effects of vitamin D and calcium supplements.
SCIENCE
October 31, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Low levels of vitamin D in the blood double the risk of developing bladder cancer, Spanish researchers reported Wednesday. The low levels increase the risk of the most aggressive form of the disease almost six-fold, the researchers reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Spain has about 11,000 new cases of bladder cancer per year, one of the highest rates in the world. The United States has about 73,500 new cases per year, with nearly 15,000 deaths. It is primarily a disease of the elderly, with nine out of 10 victims over the age of 55. Low levels of vitamin D have previously been linked to increased risk of breast and colon cancer, but no one has studied the potential association with bladder cancer, according to Dr. Nuria Malats, a geneticist at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
If you're trying to ward off the sniffles, you can take vitamin D supplements out of your shopping cart: A new study reports that dosing with the vitamin does nothing to prevent colds or other forms of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). The effect of vitamin D on the immune system has been debated for a long time. Controlled laboratory research has shown that vitamin D has several beneficial effects on the immune system, and some studies conducted in the past have suggested that people with low levels of the vitamin are at higher risk for URTIs.
SCIENCE
October 31, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Low levels of vitamin D in the blood double the risk of developing bladder cancer, Spanish researchers reported Wednesday. The low levels increase the risk of the most aggressive form of the disease almost six-fold, the researchers reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Spain has about 11,000 new cases of bladder cancer per year, one of the highest rates in the world. The United States has about 73,500 new cases per year, with nearly 15,000 deaths. It is primarily a disease of the elderly, with nine out of 10 victims over the age of 55. Low levels of vitamin D have previously been linked to increased risk of breast and colon cancer, but no one has studied the potential association with bladder cancer, according to Dr. Nuria Malats, a geneticist at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center.
SCIENCE
August 20, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
For kids who get a lot of colds during the winter, a boost in vitamin D levels may be just what the doctor ordered, researchers reported Monday. Supplementing vitamin D intake for children who were deficient halved the number of colds the children contracted, a team reported in the journal Pediatrics. Observational studies have suggested that low vitamin D levels are associated with an increased risk of colds. The new study is apparently the first to show that supplementing children's intake of the vitamin can reduce their risk of colds.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
  We mostly get our vitamin D by exposure to the sun, and these days, who just goes out in the sun? So there's been a lot of attention given to - and confusion over - vitamin D supplements, something many doctors recommend. Now there's a new study a possible vitamin D benefit: In a group of women older than 65 who had gained weight over 4½ years, those whose levels of the vitamin were low had gained a little more weight, researchers found in a study published Monday.
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