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Vitamin A

NEWS
October 7, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A major new study of Vitamin A has found that doses only slightly above the maximum recommended levels during the early stages of pregnancy significantly increase the risk of birth defects. The results prompted researchers to recommend that women of childbearing age consume Vitamin A primarily from their diet, along with modest levels in multivitamin supplements.
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NEWS
June 16, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The remedy is so simple that, for years, many people would not believe it. The United Nations Children's Fund reports that 1 million to 3 million lives could be saved annually if children in the Third World took a Vitamin A pill two or three times a year. The annual cost per child: 4 to 6 cents. In its latest annual report, UNICEF displays some striking statistics to back up this assertion.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | DAVID BROWN, THE WASHINGTON POST
There are very few wonder drugs in the world, but Vitamin A may be one of them. This dirt-cheap chemical can lower childhood mortality by about one-third in vast parts of the developing world. It prevents keratomalacia, one of the five leading causes of blindness. It's the closest thing to a specific treatment for measles. It's a fairly good therapy for some types of anemia. It may reduce the transmission of the AIDS virus from mother to fetus.
NEWS
June 15, 1993 | Associated Press
Large daily doses of Vitamin A can slow the slide toward blindness for patients with retinitis pigmentosa and may save years of eyesight for 100,000 Americans with the inherited affliction, a new study indicates. The same study also showed that large supplemental doses of Vitamin E actually accelerate the disease, said Dr. Eliot L. Berson, a Harvard Medical School researcher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1993 | STACY WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vitamin A used in combination with a chemotherapy drug can prolong the lives of patients suffering from a type of leukemia that most often strikes middle-aged adults, according to a new study by UC Irvine cancer researchers. In adult patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia, the therapy could delay by as much as eight months the onset of the disease's acute stage, when patients deteriorate rapidly, according to Dr. Frank L. Meyskens Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine researchers have received a $4.2-million grant from the National Cancer Institute to investigate whether large daily doses of two vitamins will prevent cancer in heavy cigarette smokers. The five-year study, one of the largest of its kind, will involve 4,300 Orange County volunteers who are being recruited from the ranks of healthy men and women, ages 50 to 69, who smoke regularly or used to smoke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1991 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What does the city of Santa Clarita have that San Diego and Ventura don't? Prunes at City Hall. The California Prune Board will give the city $1,000 and 600 snack packs of the moist, wrinkled fruit to start a pro-prune campaign aimed at encouraging people to try exotic prune recipes--from strawberry-prune milkshakes to prune coleslaw--after taking vigorous walks. San Diego and Ventura also applied for the program, which is co-sponsored by the nonprofit National Recreation and Park Assn.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a development with potential implications for millions of children worldwide, researchers have found that a small weekly dose of Vitamin A can markedly reduce mortality among malnourished preschool-age children. The study of 15,419 children from southern India, being reported in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, may help to settle a longstanding scientific controversy about the health benefits of Vitamin A supplements for children with inadequate diets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
High doses of Vitamin A dramatically reduced the duration of measles and cut the death rate by more than half in a group of children suffering from a severe form of the highly contagious disease, South African researchers said last week. Measles kills about 2 million children a year, especially in developing countries, despite vaccines that could prevent the viral disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1990 | REBECCA KOLBERG, Kolberg is a health writer for United Press International
Tales of Vitamin A toxicity are often bizarre, centering on Arctic explorers eating huge amounts of polar bear liver or fitness fanatics gobbling handfuls of vitamin supplements. But Americans should be aware that more subtle overloads of Vitamin A might pose some serious health risks, particularly to pregnant women, children and the elderly, federal nutrition experts say.
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