Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVitamin B
IN THE NEWS

Vitamin B

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All women of child-bearing age should take folic acid, a B vitamin, to reduce the chances of having a baby with neural tube defects, particularly spina bifida and anencephaly, federal health officials recommended Monday. The announcement is believed to be the first time the federal government has recommended the widespread use of vitamins other than during pregnancy. All female adolescents and women who could become pregnant should consume 0.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
November 8, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Forgot where you left your keys? The name of your neighbor's kid? Whether you locked the car? Anyone looking for an easy way to boost brain power is likely to come across an increasingly common piece of advice: Up your intake of B vitamins. The vitamins ? including folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 ? are often touted as a way to improve memory and stave off cognitive decline. The claims are based on the finding that levels of the vitamin are low in people with various forms of cognitive impairment, including dementia and Alzheimer's disease.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 16, 1985 | Associated Press
Though not a serious threat to one's health, bites from fleas, mosquitoes and chiggers are definitely a nuisance. One way to minimize such bites is to take Vitamin B-1, says Dr. John Green of the University of Rochester Medical Center. "Vitamin B-1 is excreted from the body's sweat glands and causes an odor that is imperceptible to humans but disagreeable and offensive to insects," he said.
HEALTH
May 11, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
I suffer from allergies and asthma. I started taking 2,000 IU of vitamin D daily several months ago. I am also taking turmeric capsules. This spring I have had no allergies, sinus infections and asthma problems. Perhaps these supplements are keeping my immune system from overreacting to pollen. In animal studies, turmeric prevents the release of histamine from mast cells (Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, September 2008).
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Vitamin B-6, an old remedy for morning sickness, is getting another look. According to a report by Iowa researchers just published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, Vitamin B-6 can help reduce the nausea and vomiting experienced by 50% or more of pregnant women. Nearly 50 years ago, researchers suggested that B-6 might help quell morning sickness, which is most common during the first trimester but sometimes occurs throughout pregnancy. In 1979, the American Medical Assn.
HEALTH
November 8, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Forgot where you left your keys? The name of your neighbor's kid? Whether you locked the car? Anyone looking for an easy way to boost brain power is likely to come across an increasingly common piece of advice: Up your intake of B vitamins. The vitamins ? including folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 ? are often touted as a way to improve memory and stave off cognitive decline. The claims are based on the finding that levels of the vitamin are low in people with various forms of cognitive impairment, including dementia and Alzheimer's disease.
HEALTH
November 6, 2000 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON, Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert
Question: Last year, I got so weak I couldn't walk. I was hospitalized, diagnosed with severe vitamin B12 deficiency and given cobalamin injections. I am now able to walk again, and I keep the B12 deficiency at bay by taking a tablet of 1,000 micrograms a day. I feel quite strong, but I urge everyone to take vitamin B12 deficiency seriously. Answer: Your experience is extreme, but vitamin B12 deficiency is not as rare as some might think. Memory and nerve function can be affected.
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Vitamin B may reduce the risk of stroke in some people, say the Oregon researchers whose study is published today in the journal Stroke. But Los Angeles stroke experts, while noting that the study has merit, say it is too soon to conclude that Vitamin B therapy is effective for reducing the risk of stroke, which afflicts a half million Americans a year. (A stroke is an interruption in the blood supply to the brain; nearly 150,000 victims die annually.
SPORTS
December 18, 1990 | JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON
Question: Several years ago I read that Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) could help people with asthma. I suggested this to my mother, and she was able to discontinue her spray after several months on the vitamin. Why don't doctors believe in vitamins? Answer: Doctors are often skeptical of remedies that have not been proven through research. This laudable attitude helps protect patients from therapies that don't work. Unfortunately, research on vitamins is often inadequate.
FOOD
December 25, 2002 | Valli Herman-Cohen, Times Staff Writer
THE art of mixing cocktails is looking a little more like science -- weird science. The young, trendy and health-attuned have quietly started blending energy drinks into their martinis and more. At fashionable parties and clubs in Los Angeles and New York, liquor companies have joined hands with makers of fortified beverages to further lift the spirits of the spirits business.
SCIENCE
September 23, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Research in mice suggests that a commonly used vitamin called nicotinamide can alleviate the symptoms of the most severe form of multiple sclerosis by protecting nerve fibers from damage. Currently, there is no effective treatment for this phase of the disease, called chronic progressive MS. The researchers at Children's Hospital Boston hope to begin trials in humans soon, but they cautioned that the doses used in the mice were substantially higher than those typically used in humans.
FOOD
December 25, 2002 | Valli Herman-Cohen, Times Staff Writer
THE art of mixing cocktails is looking a little more like science -- weird science. The young, trendy and health-attuned have quietly started blending energy drinks into their martinis and more. At fashionable parties and clubs in Los Angeles and New York, liquor companies have joined hands with makers of fortified beverages to further lift the spirits of the spirits business.
HEALTH
November 6, 2000 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON, Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert
Question: Last year, I got so weak I couldn't walk. I was hospitalized, diagnosed with severe vitamin B12 deficiency and given cobalamin injections. I am now able to walk again, and I keep the B12 deficiency at bay by taking a tablet of 1,000 micrograms a day. I feel quite strong, but I urge everyone to take vitamin B12 deficiency seriously. Answer: Your experience is extreme, but vitamin B12 deficiency is not as rare as some might think. Memory and nerve function can be affected.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All women of child-bearing age should take folic acid, a B vitamin, to reduce the chances of having a baby with neural tube defects, particularly spina bifida and anencephaly, federal health officials recommended Monday. The announcement is believed to be the first time the federal government has recommended the widespread use of vitamins other than during pregnancy. All female adolescents and women who could become pregnant should consume 0.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Vitamin B-6, an old remedy for morning sickness, is getting another look. According to a report by Iowa researchers just published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, Vitamin B-6 can help reduce the nausea and vomiting experienced by 50% or more of pregnant women. Nearly 50 years ago, researchers suggested that B-6 might help quell morning sickness, which is most common during the first trimester but sometimes occurs throughout pregnancy. In 1979, the American Medical Assn.
SPORTS
December 18, 1990 | JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON
Question: Several years ago I read that Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) could help people with asthma. I suggested this to my mother, and she was able to discontinue her spray after several months on the vitamin. Why don't doctors believe in vitamins? Answer: Doctors are often skeptical of remedies that have not been proven through research. This laudable attitude helps protect patients from therapies that don't work. Unfortunately, research on vitamins is often inadequate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1985 | Associated Press
The high doses of Vitamin B-6 sometimes prescribed for premenstrual syndrome may be toxic, according to a University of Chicago scientist whose dietary guidelines mirror those recommended by other physicians debating the keys to women's nutritional health. Dr.
HEALTH
May 11, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
I suffer from allergies and asthma. I started taking 2,000 IU of vitamin D daily several months ago. I am also taking turmeric capsules. This spring I have had no allergies, sinus infections and asthma problems. Perhaps these supplements are keeping my immune system from overreacting to pollen. In animal studies, turmeric prevents the release of histamine from mast cells (Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, September 2008).
NEWS
April 17, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Vitamin B may reduce the risk of stroke in some people, say the Oregon researchers whose study is published today in the journal Stroke. But Los Angeles stroke experts, while noting that the study has merit, say it is too soon to conclude that Vitamin B therapy is effective for reducing the risk of stroke, which afflicts a half million Americans a year. (A stroke is an interruption in the blood supply to the brain; nearly 150,000 victims die annually.
NEWS
June 16, 1985 | Associated Press
Though not a serious threat to one's health, bites from fleas, mosquitoes and chiggers are definitely a nuisance. One way to minimize such bites is to take Vitamin B-1, says Dr. John Green of the University of Rochester Medical Center. "Vitamin B-1 is excreted from the body's sweat glands and causes an odor that is imperceptible to humans but disagreeable and offensive to insects," he said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|