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Vitamin C

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SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists have identified a simple, inexpensive compound that made cancer drugs more effective in mice and helped human patients weather the toxic side effects of chemotherapy. But even as they touted their experimental results, they acknowledged that their remedy was unlikely to inspire the vigorous - and expensive - research necessary to win regulatory approval and join the ranks of mainstream medicine. The drug in question is vitamin C. When absorbed from foods such as oranges, strawberries, broccoli and kale, it feeds neurotransmitters and helps the body make collagen, among other important functions.
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SCIENCE
February 5, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Scientists have identified a simple, inexpensive compound that made cancer drugs more effective in mice and helped human patients weather the toxic side effects of chemotherapy. But even as they touted their experimental results, they acknowledged that their remedy was unlikely to inspire the vigorous - and expensive - research necessary to win regulatory approval and join the ranks of mainstream medicine. The drug in question is vitamin C. When absorbed from foods such as oranges, strawberries, broccoli and kale, it feeds neurotransmitters and helps the body make collagen, among other important functions.
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NEWS
February 26, 1991 | SHARI ROAN
Nutrition experts recommend that Americans take enough Vitamin C to prevent scurvy, a condition that causes anemia and bleeding gums. The recommended daily allowance, 60 milligrams, is set to accomplish that goal by the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board. But debate continues whether Vitamin C in larger doses helps prevent cancer, heart disease and colds. The interest in Vitamin C's role in cancer prevention largely rests on its ability to disrupt processes in the body that can lead to cancer.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Fewer parents are vaccinating their children, but still sending them off to school, warns physician and professor Nina Shapiro in our Opinion pages. In it, she argues for " unvaccinated-free zones " to protect all children from disease. “The law in California mandates that students in public and private schools be immunized, but it also allows easy-to-get exemptions for personal beliefs,” Shapiro writes. She continues: Although some 90% of the state's kindergartners are up to date on their immunizations, it is not uncommon for individual public elementary schools to report that more than one-third of their kindergartners are not. And if you're thinking this must be a problem unique to schools in low-income neighborhoods, think again.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
People who consume moderately high levels of Vitamin C have reduced death rates, most notably from heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States, according to a new UCLA study. The epidemiological study of 11,348 adults found that men who consumed the most Vitamin C had a 42% lower death rate from all causes than men in the lowest-intake group. Women in the highest-intake group had a 10% lower overall death rate than women who consumed the lowest amounts.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tests in human and mouse cancer cells grown in laboratory dishes showed that vitamin C supplements reduced the efficacy of cancer drugs by 30% to 70%, researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Cancer Research. Many patients take the vitamin as a supplement to their chemotherapy, and the researchers fear it might be reducing survival rates. The team from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York found that the vitamin protects mitochondria in cancer cells from the damaging effects of the drugs, enhancing their survival.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | Associated Press
Some 200 milligrams of vitamin C a day, about three times the current recommended daily allowance, seems to be the most healthful dose for men, according to new research by National Institutes of Health. The study, reported Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, involved just seven patients.
HEALTH
March 11, 2002 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR
In the plant world, it's hard to beat a whole fresh pineapple for drama. This fruit of a bromeliad has ferocious leaves and an absolutely prehistoric-looking outer skin. The first person who wanted to see if this thing was edible must have had a wonderful surprise upon opening it. Pineapples originated in South America and spread to the Caribbean, where Columbus found them during a voyage in 1493. The Spaniards thought they looked like pine cones, and thus the name.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | From Associated Press
Injections of vitamin C given to smokers reverse one of the most harmful cardiovascular effects of smoking, according to a study being published today. However, more research is needed to determine whether vitamin C pills might help reduce heart disease associated with cigarettes, said the authors of the study, published in the American Heart Assn. journal Circulation. The vitamin works because of its antioxidant function, said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vitamin C can protect against sperm damage in humans and thereby reduce the risk of birth defects, according to a new study by molecular biologist Bruce N. Ames and his colleagues at UC Berkeley. The effect is particularly pronounced in men who have abnormally high numbers of defective sperm because they smoke. The discovery is important, Ames said, because of the growing evidence that defective sperm are a larger source of birth defects and miscarriages than defective eggs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2012 | STEVE MARBLE
I can't really pinpoint when my dad first started bringing home the powdery mixture, as white as sugar and as fine as beach sand. He'd step into the kitchen and sprinkle it -- three grams at a time -- into some orange juice and stir to the point it crested the edge of the glass. He'd serve it with breakfast. One glass for each of us. Drink up. Had I been older, I might have protested. But I was just a kid, living in an era when the only things you were supposed to avoid eating were paper and dirt.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2010 | By Emily Bryson York
Want to manage your weight, strengthen and whiten your teeth, increase your vitamin intake? Just bored out of your mind? Have some gum. Candy manufacturers are rolling out gums for all occasions to entice people to chew more frequently. Some of the gums seem to have been pulled from science fiction, or at least Willy Wonka's factory. Kraft Foods Inc.'s Stride Shift, for instance, changes flavor while you're chewing. Trident Vitality contains vitamin C for those who can't be bothered to eat fruit.
SCIENCE
September 2, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Consumers who buy organic fruits and vegetables because they think they're tastier, more nutritious and better for the environment are getting at least some of what they're paying for, according to a study published online Wednesday. The finding is based on a detailed comparison of organic and conventional strawberries from 13 pairs of neighboring farms in Watsonville, Calif., where 40% of the state's strawberry crop is produced. A team of ecologists, food chemists, soil scientists and other experts analyzed a variety of factors before concluding that the organic berries — and the dirt they were raised in — were superior.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tests in human and mouse cancer cells grown in laboratory dishes showed that vitamin C supplements reduced the efficacy of cancer drugs by 30% to 70%, researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Cancer Research. Many patients take the vitamin as a supplement to their chemotherapy, and the researchers fear it might be reducing survival rates. The team from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York found that the vitamin protects mitochondria in cancer cells from the damaging effects of the drugs, enhancing their survival.
TRAVEL
October 22, 2006 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
TWO recent studies confirm travelers' worst suspicions: Airplanes and hotel rooms are fertile grounds for spreading cold and flu bugs. Harvard scientists confirmed that flu is spread on planes in a study released last month. Researchers found that the decline in air travel after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks delayed the onset of the 2001-02 flu season in the United States.
HEALTH
June 20, 2005 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
Sooner or later, almost everyone gets sidelined by an injury that keeps them from being physically active. Twisted ankles, tendinitis, pulled muscles and the more serious torn shoulder rotator cuffs used to mean weeks of inactivity and, with it, unwanted pounds that only complicated recovery. These days, "we approach injury much like we would with any athlete," says physical therapist Thomas Papke, a spokesman for the American Physical Therapy Assn.
NEWS
November 26, 1997 | Associated Press
It sounds like a recipe for a coronary: Serve Egg McMuffins and Sausage McMuffins for breakfast, with slabs of fried hash browns on the side, to captive research subjects. You can almost feel arteries slamming shut. Yet when huge doses of vitamins C and E were added to the diet, an extraordinary thing happened: The subjects' arteries responded to the high-fat meal as though they had eaten a low-fat bowl of corn flakes.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
"The last time I counted," says Linus Pauling, his blue eyes sparkling beneath a charcoal-colored beret, "I have seven birthday parties to go to." With that, the aging guru shuffles off to graciously accept the first of many birthday cakes and equally sugary tributes to his longevity, this one from his staff at the Linus Pauling Institute of Science and Medicine.
HEALTH
November 17, 2003 | Elena Conis
Ester-C, a patented vitamin C compound composed of ascorbic acid and calcium, was developed in the 1980s and is now widely available as a dietary supplement. The supplement's manufacturers say it's more easily absorbed and less readily excreted from the body than standard vitamin C. * Uses: Ester-C can be used as a replacement for standard vitamin C tablets, which are often taken to boost immunity and fend off ills. Dose: Supplement makers recommend 100 to 1,000 milligrams of Ester-C daily.
HEALTH
August 18, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Increasing your consumption of vitamin-C rich fruits and vegetables may protect you against ulcers and stomach cancer. In a random sample of 7,000 Americans, ages 20 to 90, researchers found that the prevalence of infection with Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium associated with ulcers, was 25% lower in those who had high levels of vitamin C in the blood than in those who had less than normal levels of the nutrient.
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